Project:Texts

From CODECS: Online Database and e-Resources for Celtic Studies

This page will soon be revised.

[edit]

Categories


Authors

forthcoming

Recent

Currently, there are 1584 entries for texts in the catalogue. Here is a list of the last 20 entries that have been added or modified. Fuller details can be seen by visiting the page.

[Luid Iason ina luing lóir], verse beg. ‘Luid Iason ina luing lóir’
» Ascribed author(s): Id:Flann Mainistrech » Language(s): Middle Irish » Form: verse » Categories: Early Irish poetry, Text entries
Short description:
Medieval Irish poem attributed to Flann Mainistrech on the destruction of Troy. Mac Eoin believed it to have been based on a prose text concerning the Trojan war but not a text of Togail Troí as we know it today.

,
[Dinnshenchas of Móin Gai Glais], verse beg. ‘Culdub mac Déin dia Samna’ , part of or cited in: Dinnshenchas Érenn A, Dinnshenchas Érenn C
» Language(s): Middle Irish » Form: verse, prose » Categories: Early Irish poetry, Dinnshenchas Érenn, Mythological Cycle, Text entries » Type: dinnshenchas, aided
Short description:
Dinnshenchas of Móin Gai Glais, in prose and verse. When Cúldub mac Déin slays one Fidrad at Samain, Gae Glas, grandson of Lug, comes to avenge Fidrad's death and kills Cúldub with a spear. The prose version, which is generally fuller, adds that the spear entered the ground and was not found until Máel Odrán dug it up and used it to kill Aithechdae, king of Uí Máil. The prose also identifies the spear as the Carr of Belach Duirgen.

,
[Dinnshenchas of Fid nGaibli], verse beg. ‘Inmain dam in Gabol glan’ , part of or cited in: Dinnshenchas Érenn A, Dinnshenchas Érenn B, Dinnshenchas Érenn C
» In English: “Dear to me is bright Gabul” » Ascribed author(s): Id:Find ... unidentified, Id:Finn mac Cumaill » Language(s): Early Irish » Form: verse, prose » Categories: Early Irish poetry, Dinnshenchas Érenn, Text entries
Short description:
Dinnshenchas of Fid nGaibli (Feeguile).

,
[Dinnshenchas of Faffand], verse beg. ‘Broccaid brogmar co n-gním gíall’ , part of or cited in: Dinnshenchas Érenn A, Dinnshenchas Érenn B, Dinnshenchas Érenn C
» Ascribed author(s): Id:Fulartach » Language(s): Middle Irish » Form: verse, prose » Categories: Early Irish poetry, Dinnshenchas Érenn, Text entries » Type: dinnshenchas
Short description:
Dinnshenchas of Faffand

,
[Dinnshenchas of Almu II], verse beg. ‘Almu robo cháem dia cois’ , part of or cited in: Dinnshenchas Érenn C
» In English: “Almu, she was fair to the foot” » Form: verse » Stanzas: 4 st. » Categories: Early Irish poetry, Dinnshenchas Érenn, Finn Cycle, Text entries » Type: dinnshenchas
Short description:
Dinnshenchas poem on Almu (the Hill of Allen, Co. Kildare)

,
[Dinnshenchas of Berba], verse beg. ‘In Berba búan a bailbe’ , part of or cited in: Dinnshenchas Érenn A, Dinnshenchas Érenn B, Dinnshenchas Érenn C
» Language(s): Middle Irish » Form: prose, verse » Categories: Early Irish poetry, Dinnshenchas Érenn, Mythological Cycle, Text entries » Type: dinnshenchas
Short description:
Dinnshenchas of the River Barrow (Berba)

, » In English: “The dinnshenchas of Ireland” » Language(s): Middle Irish » Form: verse, prose » Categories: Medieval Irish literature, Dinnshenchas Érenn, Text entries
Short description:
The Dinnshenchas Érenn is a compilation of literary compositions, in prose or verse, on lore surrounding the prominent places of Ireland. These texts usually offer origin legends which purport to explain how a well-known place in Ireland, such as a certain hill, plain or lake, received its present or former name. The genesis of this collection is usually dated to the late Middle Irish period (11th and 12th centuries).

,
[Dinnshenchas of Alend], verse beg. ‘Alend óenach diar n-ócaib’ , part of or cited in: Dinnshenchas Érenn A, Dinnshenchas Érenn C
» Language(s): Middle Irish » Form: prose, verse » Stanzas: 14 st. » Categories: Early Irish poetry, Dinnshenchas Érenn, Text entries » Type: dinnshenchas
Short description:
Prose and verse dinnshenchas of Alend

, » Categories: Early Irish poetry, Medieval Irish literature, Dinnshenchas Érenn, Text entries
, » In English: “The Psalter of verses” » Language(s): Middle Irish » Form: verse » Categories: Irish religious texts, Text entries
, » Language(s): Middle Irish » Categories: Early Irish law texts, Text entries
,
[Dám thrír táncatar ille], verse beg. ‘Dám thrír táncatar ille’ , part of or cited in: Independent, Acallam bec, Agallamh na seanórach
» Language(s): Middle Irish » Form: verse » Categories: Early Irish poetry, Finn Cycle, Text entries
, » Categories: Ulster Cycle, Text entries
Short description:
The term ‘Ulster Cycle’ is used in modern scholarship to refer to a body of Irish narrative literature set in the heroic age of the Ulaid around the time of Conchobar mac Nessa.

,
[Verba Scáthaige], verse beg. ‘A mbé eirr óengaile’ , part of or cited in: Independent, Tochmarc Emire
» In English: “When you are a peerless champion” » Language(s): Old Irish » Form: verse » Categories: Early Irish poetry, Ulster Cycle, Text entries
Short description:
Poem in the form of a prophecy delivered by Scáthach to Cú Chulainn.

,
[Dinnshenchas of Ailech I], verse beg. ‘Decid Ailech n-Imchill n-úaib’ , part of or cited in: Dinnshenchas Érenn A
» Language(s): Middle Irish » Form: verse » Stanzas: 28 st. » Categories: Early Irish poetry, Dinnshenchas Érenn, Mythological Cycle, Text entries » Type: dinnshenchas
Short description:
Poem on the dinnshenchas of Ailech.

, » In English: “On the wonders of Ireland” » Language(s): Middle Irish » Form: prose » Categories: Medieval Irish literature, Irish religious texts, Text entries
Short description:
Middle Irish account of certain wonders associated with more than 30 places in Ireland

, » In English: “The alphabet of piety / devotion” » Ascribed author(s): Id:Colmán mac Béognae » Language(s): Old Irish, Middle Irish » Form: prose » Categories: Medieval Irish wisdom literature, Text entries
, » In English: “The Holy Bible” » Categories: Modern sources on Ireland, Text entries » Type: printed book
Short description:
In 1690, the Irish translations of the Old and New Testament were published together as An Biobla Naomhtha. The printing of this book, which involved transliteration from Irish into Roman characters, was overseen by Rev. Robert Kirk, who intended it for Scottish Gaelic readers. Kirk’s effort met with little enthusiasm.

, » In English: “The stratagem of Urard mac Coise” » Author(s): Id:Urard mac Coise » Ascribed author(s): Id:Urard mac Coise » Language(s): Middle Irish » Form: prose » Categories: Cycles of the Kings, Medieval Irish literature about poets, Text entries
Short description:
A Middle Irish saga which relates how the poet Urard/Aurard mac Cosse (fl. 10th/11th century) obtained compensation from Domnall mac Muirchertaig, king of Tara, following a raid on his home. It includes version B of the medieval Irish tale lists.

, » Author(s): Id:Lynch (John) » Language(s): Latin language, Neo-Latin » Form: prose » Categories: Modern sources on Ireland, Text entries


...further results

The focal business that has stood out thus far is the creation of many basic entries for ‘texts’, a term which is here somewhat generously used to cover a wide variety of textual items: prose narratives, poems, compilations, anecdotes, treatises, homilies, glosses, charters, genealogical tracts, textual fragments, and so forth. The vast majority of these are texts transmitted in manuscript form, but on the odd occasion, texts in other textual media such as wax tablets and printed books are also taken into consideration. In addition, a catalogue entry may also describe a separate recension or individual parts of a larger unit if separate attention is warranted.
n. 1 To take one example: in addition to the main entry for the Táin bó Cúailnge and in addition to separate pages for the three main recensions of this momentous epic tale, the various episodes are given separate attention. A template placed at the bottom of the page allows readers to catch the sequence of episodes at a glimpse. Poems, including the roscada (non-syllabic accentual verse), will be given their own entries and the well-known scribal memoranda at the end of the Book of Leinster version can be found at this location.
Information about individual texts usually includes an overview of manuscripts in which they are transmitted and lists of publications such as editions, translations and secondary studies. These annotations are linked to relevant entries in the catalogue, if available, and retrieve preformatted reference details from those pages.
n. 2 What is by meant by the latter is, for instance, that the full citation is stored only once, on its own reference page (e.g. Carey, J., “The uses of tradition in Serglige Con Culainn”, in Ulidia (1994)), and can be called wherever a citation is required. In this way, editors are spared a lot of unnecessary double work and consistency of formatting does not have to rely solely on the constant vigilance of copyeditors.

Please be aware that categorisation is only rudimentary at present and what there is may not be consistent across the board. Once a more robust, fine-tuned classification scheme is in place, we can finally begin improving the user interface and offer better ways to combine search criteria.


Subprojects

More information is forthcoming

Subprojects for Irish studies

The Dinnshenchas Érenn project

An index to the compilation known as the Dinnshenchas Érenn.

The early Irish law project

An index to the compilations, texts and textual fragments relating to early Irish law.

Early Irish poetry project

See Project:Early Irish poetry

Other

Texts/compilation which embed many different textual items, such as:


CODECS is published online by Stichting A. G. van Hamel voor Keltische Studies (A. G. van Hamel Foundation for Celtic Studies) under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-SA 3.0) licence. Designed, directed and maintained by Dennis Groenewegen.