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From CODECS: Online Database and e-Resources for Celtic Studies

There are currently 1573 catalogue entries on texts.

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Background photo: Joanne – flickr.com
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  • Middle Irish
  • prose; verse
  • 6 st.
  • Short description: Tract on the dinnshenchas of Carraic Lethdeirg. The place has not been identified, apparently a “stronghold on some lake or seashore” (Gwynn). Roland M. Smith suggests that the name may refer to “Carrick on the shore of Lough Ennell” (Carrick on the Shannon).
  • Ascribed to: Colum Cille
  • Early Irish
  • verse
  • 7 st.
  • Short description: Early Irish poem representing a eulogy by Colum Cille for Cainnech.
  • In English: ‘I remember how Lugh and a portion of the fían were related’
  • Early Modern Irish
  • verse
  • 13 st.
    • Old Irish
      • In English: ‘Ferchertne's dream-vision’
      • Old Irish; Middle Irish
        • Old Irish
          • Initial words (prose): Do dingnuib in Broga inso
          • prose
          • Short description: Piece of prose on the dinnshenchas of Brug na Bóinne.
          • In English: ‘Bright it is here, o plain of Mac ind Óc’
          • Ascribed to: Cináed úa hArtacáin
          • verse
          • Short description: Poem on the dinnshenchas of Brug na Bóinne.
          • Ascribed to: Mac Nía mac Óengusso
          • Middle Irish
          • verse
          • Short description: Poem on the dinnshenchas of Brug na Bóinne.
          • [Brigit bé bithmaith]
          • verse beg. Brigit bé bithmaith
          • part of or cited in: Independent; Betha Brigte (Middle Irish)
          • In English: ‘Brigit, eternally good lady’
          • Ascribed to: Colum Cille Broccán clóen three of Brigit's household Brénainn of Clonfert Ultán of Ardbraccan
          • Old Irish
            • Middle Irish
            • prose; verse
            • 8 st.
            • Short description: Text on the dinnshenchas of Brí Léith
            • In English: ‘Da Coca’s hostel’
            • Middle Irish
            • prose
            • In English: ‘The hostel of Ath Í (‘Ford of the Yew-tree’)’
            • prose
              • Ascribed to: Ua Brolcháin (Máel Ísu)
              • Middle Irish
              • verse
              • 4 st.
              • Short description: Early Irish poem attributed to Máel Ísu Ua Brolcháin
              • In English: ‘The enclosure of the bards’
              • Ascribed to: Taliesin
              • Middle Welsh
              • verse
              • Short description: Poem attributed to the legendary poet Taliesin.
              • In English: ‘Sad is a poet after his king’
              • Ascribed to: Urard mac Coise
              • Early Modern Irish
              • verse
              • Short description: Irish bardic poem ascr. to Mac Coisi, i.e. Urard mac Coise (d. 983 x 1023), but composed well after his life-time. It laments the death of one Fergal ua Ruairc, a king whose grave at Clonmacnoise the poet is said to be visiting, and refers to the circumstances of the battle of Clontarf (1014). The king in question has been identified with Fergal ua Ruairc, king of Connacht, who died in c. 966 and is nevertheless depicted in Cogad Gáedel re Gallaib as having fought in the battle alongside Brian Bóruma.
              • In English: ‘The wise sayings of Flann (son of Oswiu)’
              • Ascribed to: Fíthal Aldfrith ... king of Northumbria
              • Short description: A collection of gnomic maxims attributed to Flann Fína or Fíthal
              • In English: ‘The precept-instruction of Cú Chulainn’
              • Middle Irish
              • Short description: An early Irish wisdom text found in the context of an episode in Serglige Con Culainn concerning royal candidacy and inauguration.
              • Ascribed to: Morann Óengus mac ind Óc Cú Chulainn
              • Old Irish
              • Short description: A group of three short Old Irish texts enumerating kennings for Irish letter-names. Each of these is ascribed to a legendary or mythical figure: (A) Bríatharogam Morainn mic Moín, (B) Bríatharogam Maic ind Óc, and (C) Bríatharogam Con Culainn. The texts occur mainly in the Ogam tract: A and B are found in the body of that text, while all three are also appended to the copies of NLI G 53 and TCD 1337.
              • Old Irish
                • In English: ‘Chronicle of the kings’
                • Middle Welsh
                • prose
                • Short description: Collective title for multiple versions of a medieval Welsh translation/adaptation of Geoffrey of Monmouth's Historia regum Brittanniae.
                • [Bruidne Érenn (prose)]
                • part of or cited in: Scéla mucce Meic Da Thó; Bruiden Da Choca; Fled Dúin na nGéd; Independent
                • Old Irish; Middle Irish
                • Short description: A brief prose account of the five or six hostels of Ireland (bruidne Érenn) and their owners occurs in a number of early Irish literary compositions and as an independent anecdote in the Book of Lismore.
                • In English: ‘The hostel (bruiden) of rowan’
                • Early Modern Irish
                • prose
                • Short description: Late Gaelic prose romance in the form of a so-called bruidhean tale about Fionn mac Cumhaill and his men, perhaps composed in the 15th or 16th century. In the story, Fionn and a number of companions are entrapped in a sinister enchanted hostel or bruidhean by Míodhach (Midac), son of Colgán (Colga), king of Lochlann. Míodhach was taken up and reared by the Fían after his father was killed in an unsuccesful attempt to seize Irish territory, but on coming of age, plotted revenge and so invited Fionn to a feast at ‘The hostel of rowan’ on the Shannon. Once inside, Fionn and his men find themselves magically glued to their seats, awaiting death by decapitation, while Míodhach is making foreign allies. They chant a dord fían (a low kind of humming), which reveals their whereabouts to the remaining members of the Fían, including Oisín, Caoilte, Innse, and Diarmuid. A series of fights ensues in which the latter resist foreign attackers and kill Míodhach. Diarmuid slays the kings of Inis Tuile (Thule) and uses their blood to release Fionn and the other captured men from the spell of enchantment (although Conán Maol does not come away without being partially skinned alive). Finally, a great battle is fought and won over the ‘King of the world’, who is defeated and beheaded.
                • Middle Irish
                • prose; verse
                • 21 st.
                • Short description: Text on the dinnshenchas of Bile Tortan
                • In English: ‘O Maelsechlainn son of Domnall’
                • Middle Irish
                • verse
                • Short description: Dinnshenchas poem on Boand (the Boyne), addressed to Máel Sechnaill mac Domnaill (d. 1022).
                • [Dinnshenchas of Boand I]
                • verse beg. Síd Nechtain sund forsin t-shléib
                • part of or cited in: Dinnshenchas Érenn A; Dinnshenchas Érenn C
                • Ascribed to: Cúán úa Lothcháin
                • Middle Irish
                • verse
                • Short description: Dinnshenchas poem of the River Boyne (Boand)
                • Middle Irish
                • prose
                • Short description: Dinnshenchas of the River Boyne (Boand), offering two different explanations of the name.
                • Initial words (prose): Madh iomgabha éiges dámha
                • prose; verse
                • Short description: An anecdote related in Bretha nemed dédenach about the birth of the Ulster poet Athairne/Athirne.
                • In English: ‘The first Bretha nemed (‘Judgments concerning privileged persons’)’
                • Old Irish
                • prose
                • Short description: Old Irish legal tract on the law of privileged persons (nemed), with particular attention being paid towards churchmen, poets and judges.
                • In English: ‘Judgments on arson’
                • Old Irish
                • prose
                  • In English: ‘Judgments on compensation for theft’
                  • Old Irish
                  • prose
                  • Short description: An early Irish legal text, now lost except for a single statement about honour-price.
                  • Old Irish
                  • Short description: An early Irish legal text that is known from references elsewhere. It does not survive or at least, no passages have been identified as belonging to this text.
                  • Middle Irish
                  • prose
                  • Short description: Text on the dinnshenchas of Brí Graide (Brí Graige)
                  • Old Irish
                  • glossing
                  • Short description: Old Irish glosses on the New Testament (the Gospels and Acts of the Apostles in particular) in the Book of Armagh. Those on the Gospels include some glosses on Matthew (f. 38rb), Mark (f. 64va) and Luke (ff. 77ra; 78rb; 81ra) and there is a bilingual (Latin and Irish) note on an Argumentum ascribed to Pelagius (f. 107v). The majority of the glosses are to be found later on, in the pages containing Revelations (ff. 170va, 171rb) and the Acts (175vb, 176rb, etc., up until f. 189vb).
                  • Middle Irish; Hiberno-Latin
                    • Old Irish
                      • Middle Irish
                      • prose; verse
                      • Short description: Text on the dinnshenchas of Bréchmag.
                      • Ascribed to: Fintan mac Bóchra
                      • Middle Irish
                      • prose; verse
                      • 14 st.
                      • Short description: Text on the dinnshenchas of Bréifne
                      • Old Irish
                      • Short description: A presumed early Irish legal text that is known only through references made to it in Irish sources; or perhaps a collective name for the sayings attributed to Bríg Ambue.
                      • Old Irish
                      • Short description: An early Irish legal text that is known from references elsewhere. It does not survive or at least, no text has been identified as belonging to this text.
                      • Old Irish
                      • Short description: An early Irish legal text that is known from references elsewhere. It does not survive or at least, no passages have been identified as belonging to this text.
                      • In English: ‘The life of Ciarán of Saigir’
                      • Irish language
                      • prose
                      • Short description: Second Irish Life of St Ciarán of Saigir (Seirkieran, Co. Offaly). According to Plummer (1925), it is based on a Latin Life now lost, which also served as an exemplar for a shorter text, Capgrave’s Life of Pieran.
                      • In English: ‘The life of Ciarán of Saigir’
                      • prose
                      • Short description: First Irish Life of St Ciarán of Saigir (Seirkieran, Co. Offaly)
                      • In English: ‘The life of (St) Colum Cille’
                      • Authored by:
                        Thought to have been authored by...
                        Ó Domhnaill (Maghnus)
                      • Early Modern Irish
                      • prose; prosimetrum
                        • In English: ‘The Life of Colmán mac Lúacháin’
                        • Middle Irish
                        • prose; verse
                          • In English: ‘The Life of (St) Cránat’
                          • Initial words (prose): Feachtus do-deachaidh Cairpre Crom, mac Criomtain
                          • Middle Irish
                          • prose
                            • In English: ‘The life of Cuimíne Fota’
                            • Middle Irish
                            • prose
                            • Short description: Middle Irish tale about the life of Cummíne Fota
                            • Early Modern Irish
                            • prose
                            • Short description: Vernacular Irish translation of the Latin Life of St Declán of Ardmore (Vita sancti Declani).
                            • In English: ‘The life of Féchín of Fore’
                            • Authored by:
                              Thought to have been authored by...
                              Nicól Óg
                            • Early Modern Irish
                            • prose
                            • Short description: Irish Life of St Féchín of Fore
                            • In English: ‘The Life of Fursa’
                            • Eary Modern Irish
                            • prose
                            • Short description: Irish life of St Fursa


                            FURTHER RESULTS…

                            • Initial words (prose): Tri hollamain Chondacht .i. mac Liacc 7 mac Coisi 7 Fland mac Lonain .i. mac De 7 mac duine 7 mac deamain
                            • Irish language
                            • prose
                            • Short description: Short Irish prose tale about three poets of Connacht, Mac Liac, Mac Coise and Flann mac Lonáin. The text occurs in the Yellow Book of Lecan by way of a preface to the verse Dinnshenchas of Slíab nEchtga II attr. to Flann and follows another prose introduction about and poem attributed to Flann (Bó bithblicht meic Lonán).
                            • Initial words (prose): Laithe n-aen dia rabadar treis gnía léigind
                            • Irish language
                            • prose
                            • Short description: Short Irish prose tale, which has been edited by Meyer as an example of bérla na filed.
                            • Early Middle Irish; Late Old Irish
                            • verse
                            • Short description: Religious poem (8 qq)
                            • Old Irish
                              • Authored by:
                                Thought to have been authored by...
                                Dungal of Saint-Denis
                              • Ascribed to: Baldo of Salzburg
                              • Latin language
                              • verse
                              • Short description: Carolingian Latin poem written by Dungal (l. 3) and addressed to a certain Baldo magister.
                              • Authored by:
                                Thought to have been authored by...
                                Hibernicus Exul
                              • Ascribed to: Hibernicus Exul
                              • Latin language
                              • verse
                              • Short description: Latin poem addressed to Charlemagne and reflecting on his conflict with Tassilo III, duke of Bavary, whom he deposed in 788. The poem is preserved, in fragmentary form (103 hexametrical lines), in a single manuscript (Vatican, BAV, MS Reg. lat. 2078) and was written by an anonymous Irishman known from the heading as Hibernicus Exul.
                              • Latin language
                              • prose
                              • Short description: Latin Life of St Brynach (Lat. Bernachius). BHL 1186.
                              • In English: ‘The history of Gruffudd ap Cynan’
                              • Middle Welsh
                              • prose
                              • Short description: Middle Welsh translation of an earlier Latin biography of the life and career of Gruffudd ap Cynan, king of Gwynedd (r. 1081-1137).
                              • Early Modern Irish
                              • Short description: Irish Life of St Catherine of Alexandria
                              • Authored by:
                                Thought to have been authored by...
                                Ó Neachtain (Tadhg)
                              • Modern Irish
                              • prose
                              • Short description: Glosses by Tadhg Tiorthach Ó Neachtain to Trecheng breth Féne (Triads of Ireland) in Dublin, Trinity College, MS 1289 (c. 1745).
                              • Short description: A brief set of Irish annals, running from the reign of Laegaire to AD 1134 and thought to be of Armagh provenance.
                              • Initial words (prose): Is hé titul fil i n-dreich ind libuir se taitni do menmanaib inna légnide
                              • Old Irish
                              • prose
                                • Latin language; Old Irish
                                • Short description: Latin and some Irish glosses on computus in Vat. lat. 5755.
                                • In English: ‘The prose ‘Lore of women’’
                                • Middle Irish
                                • prose
                                • Short description: Prose version of the Banshenchas
                                • In English: ‘The metrical ‘Lore of women’’
                                • Authored by:
                                  Thought to have been authored by...
                                  Úa Caiside (Gilla Mo Dutu)
                                • Ascribed to: Úa Caiside (Gilla Mo Dutu)
                                • Middle Irish
                                • Short description: Metrical version of the Banshenchas, composed by Gilla Mo Dutu Úa Caiside (1147)
                                • Middle Irish
                                • Short description: A Middle Irish short story about a dialogue between Brénainn of Clonfert with one of his successors, Moínenn, bishop of Clonfert, on the subject of death and the afterlife.
                                • Authored by:
                                  Thought to have been authored by...
                                  Ua Brolcháin (Máel Ísu)
                                • Middle Irish
                                • verse
                                • 9 st.
                                • Short description: Metrical invocation (9qq, treochair) of Michael the archangel.
                                • In English: ‘The rule of Ailbe of Emly’
                                • Old Irish
                                • verse
                                • 56 st.
                                • Short description: Old Irish monastic rule in metrical form
                                • Early Irish
                                • prose; list
                                • Short description: List of Irish saints classified as deacons (diacones). It is closely associated in the manuscripts with two similar lists of saints who have been bishops or priests.
                                • Early Irish
                                • prose; list
                                • Short description: List of 277 Irish saints classified as priests (sacerdotes). It is closely associated in the manuscripts with two similar lists of saints who have been bishops or deacons.
                                • Early Irish
                                • prose; list
                                • Short description: List of 292 Irish saints classified as bishops. It is associated in the manuscripts with two similar lists of saints who have been priests or deacons.
                                • Early Modern Irish
                                • prose
                                • Short description: Vernacular Irish translation of the Latin Life of St Declán of Ardmore (Vita sancti Declani).
                                • Early Irish
                                • verse
                                • 1 st.
                                • Short description: A specimen of early Irish verse cited in the Latin Life of St Declán of Ardmore (Vita sancti Declani § 21) and the later, vernacular version of the same saint (Betha Decclain).
                                • Latin language
                                • prose
                                • Short description: Latin vita of Declán of Ardmore
                                • Early Irish
                                • prose; list
                                • Short description: Early Irish tract containing lists of female Irish saints (nóebúag ‘holy virgins’) of the same name. In the manuscripts, the text immediately follows that of a similar tract known as Comainmnigud nóem nÉrenn.
                                • Early Irish
                                • prose; list
                                • Short description: Early Irish tract containing lists of Irish saints of the same name. Most copies of the text are followed by a similar tract focusing on female Irish ‘holy virgins’ (Comanmand nóebúag hÉrenn).
                                • Middle Irish
                                • verse
                                  • Middle Irish
                                  • prose; prosimetrum
                                  • Short description: The Middle Irish commentary which accompanies manuscript texts of the Félire Óengusso.
                                  • Ascribed to: Úa hUathgaile (Dublittir)
                                  • Middle Irish
                                  • verse
                                  • Short description: Middle Irish poem attributed to Dublittir Úa hUathgaile (fl. late 11th century), fer léigin at Glen Uissen, now Killeshin. It is attested both as the concluding poem in the Sex aetates mundi and in independent manuscript contexts.
                                  • In English: ‘Concerning sacred places’
                                  • Authored by:
                                    Thought to have been authored by...
                                    Adomnán
                                  • Ascribed to: Adomnán
                                  • Latin language
                                  • prose
                                  • Short description: Account by Adomnán, abbot of Iona, on the holy places of the East, based on a travel account by Gaulish monk Arculf. It was presented to King Aldfrith, king of Northumbria, in 698.
                                  • Middle Irish
                                  • prose
                                  • Short description: Middle Irish, abridged version of Bede’s De locis sanctis
                                  • Ascribed to: Byrhtferth of Ramsey
                                  • Latin language
                                  • diagram; prose
                                  • Short description: Elaborate diagram of the ‘harmony of the months and elements’, which once occupied a single page in a largely computistical manuscript compiled by Byrhtferth of Ramsey (c. 970–c. 1020). The original of this compilation is lost, but two independent ‘copies’ made in the early 12th century remain. The diagram aligns different aspects of time (solstice, equinox, months, seasons, ages of man), the zodiac and the four elements, and in this way, introduces a number of key concepts relevant to computus. In the Oxford manuscript, the diagram comes right at the end of a section (ff. 3r-7v) which contains a miscellaneous variety of short texts and visual designs related to computus, and directly precedes another section (ff. 8r-15v) containing tables and texts on computus.
                                  • In English: ‘Recreation for an emperor’
                                  • Authored by:
                                    Thought to have been authored by...
                                    Gervase of Tilbury
                                  • Latin language
                                  • prose
                                  • Short description: Encyclopaedic work written by the English jurist and cleric Gervase of Tilbury. It was dedicated to Emperor Otto IV and intended for his instruction and entertainment, although it is unclear if he ever heard or read the work. The work is divided into three books or decisiones: book I covers the early history of the world, from Creation onwards; book II offers a historical geography of the world (mappa mundi) and its provinces, with excursions on the Holy Land and the six ages of the world. While anecdotal material, including legends about marvels (mirabilia), is found throughout the first two books, book III is entirely devoted to marvellous phenomena.
                                  • Ascribed to: Patricius
                                  • Latin language
                                  • verse
                                  • Short description: Latin poem on the wonders of Ireland, attributed to a certain Patricius, who has been identified with Patrick (Gilla Pátraic), bishop of Dublin.
                                  • Initial words (prose): Lá n-áen robátar muintear Clúana a n-oireachtus for urrlár na cille
                                  • Early Modern Irish
                                  • prose
                                  • Short description: Narrative anecdote in prose based on one of the wonders in De ingantaib Érenn.
                                  • Authored by:
                                    Thought to have been authored by...
                                    Alcuin
                                  • Latin language
                                  • prose
                                  • Short description: Alcuin’s revised version of the vita of Richarius (Ricquier), an early 7th-century Frankish nobleman and founder of the monastery of Centula (Saint-Riquier, Picardy).
                                  • Latin language
                                  • prose
                                  • Short description: Earliest vita of Richarius (Riquier), an early 7th-century Frankish nobleman and founder of the monastery of Centula (Saint-Riquier, Picardy). The text has been dated to the late 7th century.
                                  • In English: ‘On the miracles of Cairnech’
                                  • Middle Irish
                                  • prose
                                  • Short description: Short narrative text concerning the miracles of St Cairnech, patron saint of Tuilén (Dulane, Co. Meath, near Kells). It is attested as an interpolation in the Book of Ballymote version of Lebor Bretnach.
                                  • Latin language
                                  • prose
                                  • Short description: A collection of around 50 religious items in Latin, notably homilies, Sunday Gospel readings, exegetical tracts and commentaries. The text is attested in a single manuscript (Vatican, MS Vat. Reg. lat. 49) thought to have been produced in Brittany in the late 10th century.
                                  • In English: ‘Listen, scholars, without flaw’
                                  • Ascribed to: Flann Mainistrech
                                  • Middle Irish
                                  • verse
                                  • 37 st.
                                  • Short description: Middle Irish poem attributed to Flann Mainistrech, embedded in a number of recensions of the Lebor gabála Érenn (Min, A and C, but not in B).
                                  • Ascribed to: Fíacc of Sletty
                                  • Old Irish
                                  • verse
                                  • Short description: Old Irish hymn attributed to Patrick’s pupil Fíacc of Sléibte (Sletty, Co. Laois).
                                  • In English: ‘The book of Cuanu’
                                  • Authored by:
                                    Thought to have been authored by...
                                    Cuanu ... author of Liber Cuanach
                                  • Early Irish
                                  • prose
                                  • Short description: An early Irish historical compilation, now lost, which is referred to thirteen times in the Annals of Ulster in various entries between the years 467 and 629 (i.e. 467, 468, 471, 475, 482, 490, 545, 553, 599, 601, 603, 611, 629). Mc Carthy suggests that this work was completed in c. 1022 and written by Cuán úa Lothcháin (d. 1024).
                                  • Early Irish
                                  • prose
                                  • Short description: A tale no longer extant but referred to as Aided Mic Shamain in the Book of Leinster version of the early Irish tale list A. The title suggests that it once related the (violent) death of a certain Mac Samáin, possibly the legendary champion of that name mentioned in Cogad Gáedel re Gallaib § 107.
                                  • Early Modern Irish
                                  • Short description: Textbook compilations of Irish bardic schools on the proper uses of grammar. The tracts constitute a rich and valuable source for Irish bardic poetry, specimens of which are amply cited, and offers evidence for many different aspects of Classical Modern Irish.
                                  • Early Modern Irish
                                  • prose
                                  • Short description: Topographical tract on the kingdom of Fir Maige Féne or Caílle (Caoille)
                                  • In English: ‘The life of Molaga’
                                  • Middle Irish; Early Modern Irish
                                  • prose
                                  • Short description: Life of St Mo Laga (Molaga) of Tulach Mín Mo Laga, Co. Cork
                                  • Authored by:
                                    Thought to have been authored by...
                                    Boethius
                                  • Latin language
                                    • Authored by:
                                      Thought to have been authored by...
                                      Boethius
                                    • Latin language
                                      • Authored by:
                                        Thought to have been authored by...
                                        Boethius
                                      • Latin language
                                      • prose; verse
                                      • Short description: Collective title for short theological treatises by Boethius: 1. De trinitate; 2. Utrum pater et filius et spiritus sanctus de divinitate substantialiter praedicentur; 3. Quomodo substantiae or De hebdomadibus; 4. De fide catholica; 5. Contra Eutychen et Nestorium.
                                      • Authored by:
                                        Thought to have been authored by...
                                        Boethius
                                      • Latin language
                                      • prose; verse


                                        FURTHER RESULTS…

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