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Events



    • Sat
    • 06
    • Feb
    • 2016
  • cursus

Taalcursus modern Iers

Arkel, Nederland Folkertsstraat 6, 4241 BE Arkel

  • organised (or hosted) by: Stichting A. G. van Hamel voor Keltische Studies / Nike Stam
De eerste dag van de taalcursus Modern Iers staat gepland op zaterdag 6 februari 2016. Zie het nieuwsbericht: Stichting organiseert taalcursussen hedendaags Iers en Welsh.



    • Sat
    • 13
    • Feb
    • 2016
  • cursus

Taalcursus modern Welsh

Arkel, The Netherlands Folkertsstraat 6, 4241 BE Arkel

  • organised (or hosted) by: Stichting A. G. van Hamel voor Keltische Studies / Ashwin Gohil
De eerste dag van de taalcursus Modern Iers staat gepland op zaterdag 13 februari 2016. Zie het nieuwsbericht: Stichting organiseert taalcursussen hedendaags Iers en Welsh.

    • Fri
    • 18
    • Mar
    • 2016

    • Sun
    • 20
    • Mar
    • 2016

  • conference
  • Ulidia: International Conference on the Ulster Cycle of Tales

Ulidia V: Fifth International Conference on the Ulster Cycle of Tales

Maynooth, Ireland

Call for papers
The closing date (8 January 2016) has expired

    • Wed
    • 06
    • Apr
    • 2016

    • Fri
    • 08
    • Apr
    • 2016

  • symposium

Landscape and Myth in North-Western Europe

Munich, Germany

  • organised (or hosted) by: Institut für Nordische Philologie, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München

Keynote lectures will be presented by Stefan Brink (Aberdeen), Terry Gunnell (Reykjavík), and Gregory Toner (Belfast)

We are delighted to announce a symposium at the Ludwig-Maximilians-University in Munich on the relationship between landscape and myth in the medieval literatures and modern folklore of Iceland, Ireland, Great Britain, and the continental Scandinavian countries.

The symposium will provide a venue to discuss topics such as (but not restricted to) the sematisation of space through narratives about supernatural agents, especially the ascription of religious meaning to real-world landscapes and landscape features; sacral and mythological place names; the systematisation of place-name lore and associated supernatural elements in works such as the Icelandic Landnámabók or the Irish collections of dinnshenchas material; the use of landscape in extensive fictional narratives with strong supernatural elements that are not place-name stories as such, but whose plot moves through densely charged real-world landscapes (such as Bárðar saga or Táin Bó Cúailnge); diachronic changes in and competing contemporary interpretations of the supernatural place-lore attached to specific landscapes and landscape features; the relationship between ‘folkloric’ place-lore and medieval literature; or the relationship between Christian and ‘pagan’ lore in the mythological semantisation of landscape.

Thus, the conference hopes to further research on the relationship between mythical narratives and real-world landscapes throughout the area of the medieval Norse expansion in ‘North Atlantic Europe’, including both questions about the relationship between myth, literature, and real-world landscapes, and any intercultural connections that might exist between the place-lore traditions of the Norse and Celtic countries.

Call for papers
The closing date (31 December 2015) has expired

    • Thu
    • 30
    • Jun
    • 2016

    • Fri
    • 01
    • Jul
    • 2016

  • conference
  • Rencontre Bretagne–Monde anglophone

Conférence internationale Bretagne–Écosse / international Brittany–Scotland Conference

Brest, Brittany

Following on from the successful 2012 Brittany-Cornwall and 2014 Brittany-Ireland conferences organised by the CRBC, the 2016 Brittany-Scotland international conference will be held in Brest on June 30 and July 1, 2016. The conference will bring together scholars from a broad range of disciplines in Brittany, Scotland, and beyond. It will explore relationships and parallels between the two regions/nations, bringing into new focus their shared histories, their multilingual identities and cultures (Breton/Gallo/French; Gaelic/Scots/English) and their responses to shifting cultural and socio-economic circumstances.

Potential topics may include the following:

  • historical, cultural, and economic networks, exchanges, and relationships between Brittany and Scotland
  • language, language shift, and linguistics in Brittany and Scotland
  • language policies and minority-language education in Brittany and Scotland
  • literatures of Brittany and Scotland
  • travel literature of Brittany and the Highlands
  • conceptions of Brittany and the Highlands as ‘on the periphery’
  • eighteenth- and nineteenth-century reception of Romantic literature in Brittany and Scotland
  • church and language in Brittany and Scotland
  • devotion and hagiography in Brittany and Scotland;
  • contemporary concepts of ‘Celtic spirituality’ in Brittany and Scotland
  • archaeology, material culture, and visual culture in Brittany and Scotland
  • representations of Brittany and Scotland in the visual arts
  • cultural, musical, and linguistic revivals in Brittany and Scotland
  • contemporary cultural exchanges between Scotland and Brittany
  • pan-Celticism in Brittany and Scotland
  • folklore collection and archives in Brittany and Scotland
  • comparative exploration of literature, folklore, dance, and song in Brittany and Scotland
  • theatre, drama, and performance in minority-language cultures in Brittany and Scotland
  • minority-language publishing in Brittany and Scotland
  • shipbuilding and the maritime environment and economy in Brittany and Scotland
  • the slave trade, privateering, and piracy in Brittany and Scotland
  • conceptions of the imperial in Scotland and Brittany
  • Brittany and Scotland in wartime
  • Breton and Scottish diasporas, urban and/or overseas
  • Brittany and Scotland and Europe – historical and contemporary
Call for papers
The closing date (15 December 2015) has expired

    • Mon
    • 04
    • Jul
    • 2016

    • Thu
    • 07
    • Jul
    • 2016

  • congress
  • International Medieval Congress

23rd International Medieval Congress: Food, Feast & Famine

Leeds, UK

Call for papers
Closing date:
The Online Proposal Form will be available from 31 May 2015.

The IMC seeks to provide an interdisciplinary forum for the discussion of all aspects of Medieval Studies. Paper and session proposals on any topic related to the European Middle Ages are welcome. However, every year, the IMC chooses a special thematic strand which - for 2016 - is 'Food, Feast & Famine'. The theme has been chosen for the crucial importance of both phenomena in social and intellectual discourse, both medieval and modern, as well as their impact on many aspects of the human experience.

Food is both a necessity and a marker of economic and social privilege. Who cooks food, who consumes it in the Middle Ages? How and what did people from different social levels or religious commitments eat? How did eating change? How were these issues contested and represented? What does food reveal about differing aspects of medieval society and culture?

The aim is to cover the entire spectrum of famine to feast through multi-disciplinary approaches. Study of the medieval economy raises issues about standards of living and nutritional health. Both archaeological as well as textual evidence have been used to explore crop yields, agricultural methods, transport problems, dearth, and famine. Geographical and social variations in diet are important for understanding medieval taste and the era's definitions of sufficiency and luxury. Food is an expression of international relations and trade, as shown in the intercultural influences between Christian Europe and Islamic Spain, North Africa, the Eastern Mediterranean, and India.

Across medieval Europe the acquisition, preservation, and storage of food was a struggle for much of the population, but food consumption was also a means for a clerical and noble elite to display taste and ostentation. In popular culture, feasting is perceived as one of the major activities of the medieval elite. The religious significance of food and fasting in the Middle Ages was part of Christian, Muslim, and Jewish practice. Fasting and food had wide-ranging interconnections with piety and charity, and could involve renunciation of an exceptional intensity. Spiritual and physical nourishment and its absence can be explored in many disciplines from the theological, legal, and literary to the art historical and linguistic.


    • Wed
    • 24
    • Aug
    • 2016

    • Fri
    • 26
    • Aug
    • 2016

  • symposium
  • International Symposium of Societas Celtologica Nordica

XVth International Symposium of Societas Celtologica Nordica

Helsinki, Finland

The keynote speakers of the symposium include: Prof. John Carey (University College Cork), Prof. Máire Herbert (University College Cork), Prof. Tomás Ó Cathasaigh (Harvard University), and Prof. Robin Chapman Stacey (University of Washington).

For further information on the symposium and the society, visit https://sfksry.wordpress.com/about/in-english/. The organising committee of the symposium are: Katja Ritari (chair of the organizing committee), Alexandra Bergholm, Jarno Jalonen, Antti Lampinen, Riitta Latvio, Tiia Mensio, Stefan Smirnov and Ilona Tuomi. Enquiries to organisers can be directed by e-mail to katja.ritari@helsinki.fi.

Call for papers
Closing date: 7 March 2016

Papers are invited for the XV International Symposium of Societas Celtologica Nordica organised by the Finnish Society for Celtic Studies in Helsinki, 24-26 August 2016. The symposium celebrates the 25th anniversary of the Finnish Society for Celtic Studies.

Papers will be 20 minutes in length and may deal with any aspect of Celtic studies. Proposals for thematic sessions are also welcomed. Abstracts (max 200 words) and/or proposals for sessions should be sent by 07.03.2016 by e-mail attachment to katja.ritari@helsinki.fi.