Jump to: navigation, search

Events/list

Events



    • Fri
    • 10
    • Jun
    • 2016

    • Sat
    • 11
    • Jun
    • 2016

  • conference
  • Eighteenth-Century Ireland Annual Conference

Eighteenth-Century Ireland Annual Conference (2016)

Galway, Ireland National University of Ireland, Galway


    • Mon
    • 20
    • Jun
    • 2016

    • Sat
    • 02
    • Jul
    • 2016

  • summer school

CRBC Summer School in Breton Language and Heritage Studies

Quimper, Brittany Pôle universitaire Pierre-Jakez Helias, 18 Avenue de la Plage des Gueux, CS 12024, 29018 QUIMPER

Summer school in Breton linguistic and cultural heritage studies at the pôle universitaire Pierre-Jakez Hélias situated at Creac’h Gwen in the medieval town of Quimper/Kemper.

The University of Western Brittany is delighted to announce its second annual Summer School in Breton Language and Heritage Studies. Until last year, scholars with an interest in the Celtic languages and cultures had little opportunity to study the Breton language, literature and culture. Yet, it is sometimes forgotten that there are as many native speakers of Breton (roughly 200,000) as there are native speakers of Welsh. The course provides an excellent opportunity to study one of the two major surviving Brythonic Celtic languages and the only Celtic language to have survived on the continent of Europe.

Graduate, postgraduate students as well as university researchers and specialists with an interest in Celtic studies and the Breton language and culture in particular are warmly encouraged to apply. Motivated undergraduate students, non-academics with a foundation in Celtic language or linguistics are also welcome. It is hoped the course will attract a mix of French and English-speaking participants which will contribute to expanding the horizons of all. No prior knowledge of Breton is required for the level 1 class described below (see Programme).


    • Thu
    • 30
    • Jun
    • 2016

    • Fri
    • 01
    • Jul
    • 2016

  • conference
  • Rencontre Bretagne–Monde anglophone

Conférence internationale Bretagne–Écosse / international Brittany–Scotland Conference

Brest, Brittany

Following on from the successful 2012 Brittany-Cornwall and 2014 Brittany-Ireland conferences organised by the CRBC, the 2016 Brittany-Scotland international conference will be held in Brest on June 30 and July 1, 2016. The conference will bring together scholars from a broad range of disciplines in Brittany, Scotland, and beyond. It will explore relationships and parallels between the two regions/nations, bringing into new focus their shared histories, their multilingual identities and cultures (Breton/Gallo/French; Gaelic/Scots/English) and their responses to shifting cultural and socio-economic circumstances.

Potential topics may include the following:

  • historical, cultural, and economic networks, exchanges, and relationships between Brittany and Scotland
  • language, language shift, and linguistics in Brittany and Scotland
  • language policies and minority-language education in Brittany and Scotland
  • literatures of Brittany and Scotland
  • travel literature of Brittany and the Highlands
  • conceptions of Brittany and the Highlands as ‘on the periphery’
  • eighteenth- and nineteenth-century reception of Romantic literature in Brittany and Scotland
  • church and language in Brittany and Scotland
  • devotion and hagiography in Brittany and Scotland;
  • contemporary concepts of ‘Celtic spirituality’ in Brittany and Scotland
  • archaeology, material culture, and visual culture in Brittany and Scotland
  • representations of Brittany and Scotland in the visual arts
  • cultural, musical, and linguistic revivals in Brittany and Scotland
  • contemporary cultural exchanges between Scotland and Brittany
  • pan-Celticism in Brittany and Scotland
  • folklore collection and archives in Brittany and Scotland
  • comparative exploration of literature, folklore, dance, and song in Brittany and Scotland
  • theatre, drama, and performance in minority-language cultures in Brittany and Scotland
  • minority-language publishing in Brittany and Scotland
  • shipbuilding and the maritime environment and economy in Brittany and Scotland
  • the slave trade, privateering, and piracy in Brittany and Scotland
  • conceptions of the imperial in Scotland and Brittany
  • Brittany and Scotland in wartime
  • Breton and Scottish diasporas, urban and/or overseas
  • Brittany and Scotland and Europe – historical and contemporary
Call for papers
The closing date (15 December 2015) has expired

    • Thu
    • 30
    • Jun
    • 2016

    • Sat
    • 02
    • Jul
    • 2016

  • conference
  • Irish Conference of Medievalists

30th Irish Conference of Medievalists (2016)

Maynooth, Ireland

The Irish Conference of Medievalists (ICM) was established in 1987 and has met yearly ever since. It is one of the longest running conferences of its type. Since the beginning, the ICM has had the purpose of showcasing the latest research in both Irish and international medieval studies. The ICM welcomes speakers from Ireland and abroad on all aspects of the Middle Ages.

The ICM has a well-established tradition of moving venue every few years. To date, it has been convened in Maynooth, Kilkenny, Limerick, Galway and Dublin. The 2016 and 2017 conferences will be hosted by Maynooth University in association with St Patrick’s College Maynooth. From 2018 the ICM will be hosted by University College Cork.

Call for papers
The closing date (18 March 2016) has expired

    • Sat
    • 02
    • Jul
    • 2016
10:00 - 18:00
  • conference

Celts, Romans, Britons: Classical and Celtic Influence in Britain, 55 BC – 2016 AD

Oxford, UK Radcliffe Humanities Building, Woodstock Road, OX2 6GG

An Interdisciplinary Conference Investigating the Place of Celtic and Classical Heritage in the British Historical Imagination

This conference will investigate the profound influence of Celtic and Classical heritage on the development of British historical identity. A series of chronologically arranged panels will attempt to trace the respective importance of Ancient Britons and Romans in British culture over the centuries, from the pre-Roman period to the present day. Speakers specializing in a wide range of different subjects, from ancient archaeology to 20th century literature, will discuss the ways in which these two cultures have been appropriated, rejected, combined, and contrasted by different generations of Britons. Were they seen as opposing poles of savagery and civilization, or did they embody competing ideals of Britishness? Did they at any time lose relevance, and what is their status in British culture today?

Confirmed Speakers: Prof. Barry Cunliffe (Oxford), Dr. Alex Woolf (St. Andrews), Prof. Helen Fulton (Bristol), Prof. Ceri Davies (Swansea), Prof. Philip Schwyzer (Exeter), Dr. Mary-Ann Constantine (University of Wales), Prof. Rosemary Sweet (Leicester), Dr. Philip Burton (Birmingham), Prof. Richard Hingley (Durham).

The conference will be held in the Radcliffe Humanities Building, Woodstock Rd., Oxford on July 2nd 2016. Registration: FREE for students/unwaged attendees, £15 waged (includes refreshments/lunch/wine reception).

Organised by Francesca & Rhys Kaminski-Jones, in association with The University of Wales Centre For Advanced Welsh and Celtic Studies (CAWCS) and Oxford Medieval Studies, sponsored by The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities (TORCH), Royal Holloway University of London, the Institute of Classical Studies, the Classical Association, and the Learned Society of Wales.

Registration Required, Space Limited. To register, contact the organisers at celtclassics@gmail.com.


    • Mon
    • 04
    • Jul
    • 2016

    • Thu
    • 07
    • Jul
    • 2016

  • congress
  • International Medieval Congress

23rd International Medieval Congress: Food, Feast & Famine

Leeds, UK

Call for papers
Closing date:
The Online Proposal Form will be available from 31 May 2015.

The IMC seeks to provide an interdisciplinary forum for the discussion of all aspects of Medieval Studies. Paper and session proposals on any topic related to the European Middle Ages are welcome. However, every year, the IMC chooses a special thematic strand which - for 2016 - is 'Food, Feast & Famine'. The theme has been chosen for the crucial importance of both phenomena in social and intellectual discourse, both medieval and modern, as well as their impact on many aspects of the human experience.

Food is both a necessity and a marker of economic and social privilege. Who cooks food, who consumes it in the Middle Ages? How and what did people from different social levels or religious commitments eat? How did eating change? How were these issues contested and represented? What does food reveal about differing aspects of medieval society and culture?

The aim is to cover the entire spectrum of famine to feast through multi-disciplinary approaches. Study of the medieval economy raises issues about standards of living and nutritional health. Both archaeological as well as textual evidence have been used to explore crop yields, agricultural methods, transport problems, dearth, and famine. Geographical and social variations in diet are important for understanding medieval taste and the era's definitions of sufficiency and luxury. Food is an expression of international relations and trade, as shown in the intercultural influences between Christian Europe and Islamic Spain, North Africa, the Eastern Mediterranean, and India.

Across medieval Europe the acquisition, preservation, and storage of food was a struggle for much of the population, but food consumption was also a means for a clerical and noble elite to display taste and ostentation. In popular culture, feasting is perceived as one of the major activities of the medieval elite. The religious significance of food and fasting in the Middle Ages was part of Christian, Muslim, and Jewish practice. Fasting and food had wide-ranging interconnections with piety and charity, and could involve renunciation of an exceptional intensity. Spiritual and physical nourishment and its absence can be explored in many disciplines from the theological, legal, and literary to the art historical and linguistic.


    • Fri
    • 08
    • Jul
    • 2016

    • Sat
    • 09
    • Jul
    • 2016

  • conference
  • Language Diversity in Wales Conference

2il Gynhadledd am Amrywiaeth yng Nghymru: Ffiniau / 2nd Conference on Language Diversity in Wales: Boundaries

Aberystwyth, Wales National Library of Wales, Aberystwyth

Boundaries define who we are and who we are not. They unite and divide us. They exist within us, and are external to us. Some are even created by us. Boundaries take on many forms – linguistic, literary, and cultural; they are an integral part of human life.

This year’s conference, contemplating the theme of boundaries within the linguistic diversity in Wales and other Welsh speaking areas, aims to provide a forum for those interested in discussing these issues. Following on from the success of last year’s conference, this year’s event will once again be a symposium dealing with linguistics, history, literary studies, and other areas relevant for language diversity in Welsh-speaking areas. The forum is open to researchers interested in translation studies, media studies, arts, and anthropology insofar as they are working on topics connected with the language diversity of Wales.

Call for papers
The closing date (1 April 2016) has expired

    • Wed
    • 24
    • Aug
    • 2016

    • Fri
    • 26
    • Aug
    • 2016

  • symposium
  • International Symposium of Societas Celtologica Nordica

XVth International Symposium of Societas Celtologica Nordica

Helsinki, Finland

The keynote speakers of the symposium include: Prof. John Carey (University College Cork), Prof. Máire Herbert (University College Cork), Prof. Tomás Ó Cathasaigh (Harvard University), and Prof. Robin Chapman Stacey (University of Washington).

For further information on the symposium and the society, visit https://sfksry.wordpress.com/about/in-english/. The organising committee of the symposium are: Katja Ritari (chair of the organizing committee), Alexandra Bergholm, Jarno Jalonen, Antti Lampinen, Riitta Latvio, Tiia Mensio, Stefan Smirnov and Ilona Tuomi. Enquiries to organisers can be directed by e-mail to katja.ritari@helsinki.fi.

Call for papers
The closing date (7 March 2016) has expired

    • Sat
    • 17
    • Sep
    • 2016
  • symposium

Dánta Grádha Symposium

Dublin, Ireland School of Celtic Studies, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies;

  • organised (or hosted) by: School of Celtic Studies, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies
  • website: http://www.celt.dias.ie

To celebrate the passing of one hundred years since the publication of the first edition of Dánta Grádha edited by Tomás Ó Rathile, a symposium on the dánta grá, the courtly love poetry of Early Modern Ireland and Scotland, will be held in the School of Celtic Studies, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies on 17 September 2016. Further details will be announced in due course.

Speakers:

Neil Buttimer (UCC)
Mícheál Hoyne (DIAS)
Dafydd Johnston (Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies, Aberystwyth)
Mícheál Mac Craith (St. Isidore’s College, Rome)
Damian McManus (TCD)
Deirdre Nic Mhathúna (St. Patrick’s College, Drumcondra)
Máirín Ní Dhonnchadha (NUIG)
Síle Ní Mhurchú (DIAS)
Ruairí Ó hUiginn (NUIM)

    • Fri
    • 30
    • Sep
    • 2016

    • Sat
    • 01
    • Oct
    • 2016

  • conference
  • Skians Annual Conference

Skians Conference 2016

Call for papers
Closing date: 30 May 2016

Papers are invited on topics in the fields of linguistics and socio-linguistics relevant to the Cornish language. Abstracts should not exceed 200 words and should include titles and affiliations. Papers should be planned for up to 20mins in length and poster presentations and presentations via Skype are welcomed.

Abstracts should be submitted by Monday 30th May 2016 and sent to cornishlanguage@cornwall.gov.uk.

The following coordinate was not recognized: div><span class="errorbox">Fatal error: Failed to parse or geocode</span></div><br /><br />.

    • Fri
    • 28
    • Oct
    • 2016

    • Sat
    • 29
    • Oct
    • 2016

  • symposium

Celebrating the Saints: A Focus on Martyrologies and Calendars

Dublin, Ireland Neill Theatre, Long Room Hub, Trinity College

The programme will be published by May 1st.

The Department of Irish and Celtic Languages and the Trinity Long Room Hub Arts and Humanities Research Institute are pleased to announce that they are hosting an interdisciplinary symposium entitled Celebrating the Saints: A Focus on Martyrologies and Calendars. This symposium calls attention to martyrologies and saints calendars from the early medieval to early modern period in both Latin and the vernacular, and brings together scholars from diverse fields of expertise. Over the space of two days, the symposium will feature contributions from historians, Celticists, Latinists, Anglo-Saxonists and theologians, as well as a round table discussion with a view to exploring new comparative approaches and avenues for future research. The keynote lecture will be given by Prof. Pádraig Ó Riain.

The following coordinate was not recognized: div><span class="errorbox">Fatal error: Failed to parse or geocode</span></div><br /><br />.

    • Fri
    • 25
    • Nov
    • 2016

    • Sat
    • 26
    • Nov
    • 2016

  • conference

Rediscovering the Vikings: Reception, Recovery, Engagement

Cork, Ireland University College Cork

The World-Tree Project is a large-scale community collection initiative in the field of Old Norse and Viking Studies, funded by an Irish Research Council ‘New Horizons’ Grant. The World-Tree archive will be launched with an interdisciplinary conference on the theme of Rediscovering the Vikings at University College Cork. We are especially pleased to announce our invited speakers for Rediscovering the Vikings.

Special Guest: Kevin Crossley-Holland

Keynote speakers:

  • Professor Judith Jesch (University of Nottingham)
  • Professor Neil Price (Uppsala University)

Early Career plenary speakers:

  • Dr Leszek Gardela (University of Rzeszów)
  • Dr Marjolein Stern (University of Groningen)

The objective of this conference is to bring together academics and enthusiasts with an interest in community engagement, cultural heritage and reception studies to discuss new approaches to the Viking Age and possibilities for involving the public in the study of the period. Interest in the Vikings is at an all-time high thanks to the popularity of History Channel’s Vikings and similar series; tourism to Viking sites is flourishing; and historical fiction with a Viking theme is more popular than ever. Collaborations such as the recent Viking exhibition curated by the National Museums of Denmark, Britain and Germany, the Destination Viking concept and the Languages, Myths and Finds Project have further highlighted the transnational appeal of the Viking past, whilst also drawing attention to the fact that this common heritage is relevant in different ways for different populations. The launch of the World-Tree archive presents an excellent opportunity to discuss the ways in which interest in the Vikings can be translated into meaningful collaboration, to address reception in a European context, and to critically reflect on how digital technologies are changing the ways in which we collaborate, conduct research and interpret the Viking world.

Call for papers
The closing date (20 May 2016) has expired
The following coordinate was not recognized: div><span class="errorbox">Fatal error: Failed to parse or geocode</span></div><br /><br />.