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Events/list

Events



    • Sat
    • 01
    • Aug
    • 2015

    • Sat
    • 08
    • Aug
    • 2015

  • festival
  • National Eisteddfod of Wales

National Eisteddfod of Wales 2015

Montgomeryshire, Wales, UK


    • Sat
    • 22
    • Aug
    • 2015

    • Tue
    • 25
    • Aug
    • 2015

  • conference
  • Monastic Europe Conference

Monastic Europe Conference 2015: Landscape & Settlement

Ennis, Co. Clare, Ireland

The Irish Research Council-funded Monastic Europe: Landscape and Settlement project is a research partnership between the Department of the History of Art and Architecture, Trinity College Dublin, the Discovery Programme and the Department of History, University College Cork. The project is examining the unusually well preserved remains of late medieval monastic buildings in Ireland within their broader European context, with a particular emphasis on their architecture and impact on the landscape around them.

The project team pleased to announce an international conference, to be held 22nd – 25th August in Ennis, Co. Clare, Ireland. Located in an area rich with the medieval buildings of the European monastic orders, the conference will balance sessions of papers with a number site visits, and will stimulate a focused academic debate on the impact of monasticism in shaping the development of the physical environment across Europe between c.1100 and c.1700.

Conference themes will include:

  • The topography of medieval monastic settlement (1100-1700), in both urban and rural environments
  • The impact of Church reforms on the physical structures and landscapes of the monastic Church
  • Monastic space (liturgical, social and architectural aspects)
  • Patronage networks
  • Architecture and identities
  • Written sources for understanding the monastic environment

    • Thu
    • 27
    • Aug
    • 2015

    • Fri
    • 28
    • Aug
    • 2015

  • conference

Ó Longáin Conference

Cork, Ireland Main Campus, Room WW6

The first ever major conference to discuss the work of the Ó Longáin family of scribes, their circle and historic context will be held at UCC on August 27/28 2015. Speakers will include Breandán Ó Conchúir, Timothy O’Neill, David Dickson, Joan Rockley, Margaret Lantry, Siobhán Fitzpatrick, John Mulcahy, Meidhbhín Ní Úrdail, and Pádraig Ó Macháin. This conference is funded through a generous donaton in memory of Frances Atkins.

Admission is free, but please indicate your intention to attend by emailing p.omachain@ucc.ie


    • Wed
    • 02
    • Sep
    • 2015

    • Sat
    • 05
    • Sep
    • 2015

  • Conference
  • Annual Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists

21st Annual Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists

Glasgow, Scotland

This year's meeting will include ‘Celtic connections’ as one of its central themes.

    • Thu
    • 10
    • Sep
    • 2015

    • Fri
    • 11
    • Sep
    • 2015

  • conference

Post-Print Manuscript Cultures in Ireland, Scotland and Iceland

Derry, Northern Ireland

  • organised (or hosted) by: Ulster University, Derry

The overall objectives of this conference are (i) to look at the later Irish, Scottish and Icelandic manuscript cultures of this period in a comparative way, (ii) attempt to identify commonalities and differences between scribal practices in each country, and (iii) to establish further avenues for comparative study of the late manuscript tradition in the 'Atlantic fringe' area.

...

Plenary Speakers: Dr Aonghas Mac Coinnich (Glasgow University), Prof. Matthew Driscoll (Arnamagnæan Institute, University of Copenhagen), Prof. Margrét Eggertsdóttir (Árni Magnússon Institute for Icelandic Studies, Reykjavík), Dr Ulrike Hogg (National Library of Scotland), Prof. Pádraig Ó Macháin (University College Cork), Prof. Liam Mac Mathúna (University College Dublin)

...

Enquiries to: Dr Nioclás Mac Cathmhaoil, Irish and Celtic Studies Research Institute, Ulster University, Derry, Northern Ireland (nm.mccaul@ulster.ac.uk)


    • Thu
    • 17
    • Sep
    • 2015

    • Fri
    • 18
    • Sep
    • 2015

  • colloquium
  • Lublin Celtic Colloquium

1st Lublin Celtic Colloquium: New Trails and Beaten Paths in Celtic Studies

Lublin, Poland

Confirmed plenary speakers:

Prof. Alan Titley, University College Cork
Prof. Sabine Asmus, University of Szczecin

    • Fri
    • 18
    • Sep
    • 2015
  • conference

Medieval Myths and British Identities: Past, Present, Future

Cardif, Wales Cardiff University

An interdisciplinary postgraduate conference

The British Isles have a range of myths and legends. Cultural icons such as King Arthur and Robin Hood, historical personages like William Wallace and Owain Glyndŵr, along with mythological figures including Fionn mac Cumhaill, Pwyll Pendefig Dyfed, and Cù Chulainn, are all part of the pantheon of British and Irish national heroes. These medieval myths remain popular throughout the British Isles, and they have become vehicles for the expression of various national identities.

This conference, generously funded by the University Graduate College and the Learned Society of Wales, intends to bring together postgraduate researchers working in various fields to discuss the relationship between myth and national identity in the British Isles. In particular, the conference will focus on the changing political and ideological potential of medieval myths, and will consider how these myths have been used to construct the national identities of England, Ireland, Scotland, and Wales, from the medieval period to the present day, as well as the construction of a British (i.e. UK) identity in the latter period.

Call for papers
The closing date (24 July 2015) has expired

    • Thu
    • 08
    • Oct
    • 2015
5:00 pm
  • lecture
  • John V. Kelleher Lecture

John V. Kelleher Lecture 2015: Fergus Kelly

Cambridge, US Harvard Faculty Club, 20 Quincy Street


    • Fri
    • 09
    • Oct
    • 2015

    • Sun
    • 11
    • Oct
    • 2015

  • colloquium
  • Harvard Celtic Colloquium

35th Harvard Celtic Colloquium 2015

Cambridge, US The Thompson Room (Room 110), Barker Center, 12 Quincy Street

Since 1981, the graduate students of the Harvard Celtic Department have organized and hosted the Annual Harvard Celtic Colloquium and have published selected papers in The Proceedings of the Harvard Celtic Colloquium. The Colloquium attracts students and scholars from North America, Ireland, Great Britain and Europe, and welcomes paper proposals dealing with any aspect of the Celtic languages, their literatures and their cultures in any period, including papers with an interdisciplinary or theoretical perspective.

The Colloquium is held each year in October, and opens with the John V. Kelleher Memorial Lecture sponsored by the department on the Thursday afternoon of the Colloquium weekend.

Call for papers
The closing date (7 May 2015) has expired

    • Sat
    • 24
    • Oct
    • 2015

    • Sun
    • 25
    • Oct
    • 2015

  • colloquium
  • Thinking about Celtic Mythology in the 21st Century

3rd Colloquium on ‘Thinking about Celtic Mythology in the 21st Century’

Edinburgh, Scotland 50 George Square, University of Edinburgh

The 3rd Annual Colloquium will be held at the University of Edinburgh on 24-25 October 2015. It will include a day conference on Celtic Mythology on the Saturday and there will be informal discussion of potential developments within the field of Celtic Studies on the Sunday.

The lead speaker at the conference is Professor Daniel Melia (University of California at Berkeley) who will address the topic of ‘Sticky Figures: The Afterlife of Pre-Christian Supernatural Beings in Medieval Celtic Texts’.

The programme will also include ‘Thinking about Myth in the 7th Century with Tírechán, St Patrick and King Lóegaire’s Daughters’ by Dr Elizabeth Gray (Harvard University) and ‘Magic and Miracle in Medieval Ireland’ by Professor Jacqueline Borsje (University of Amsterdam).

Offers of further papers are now being received.

Call for papers
Closing date:

Offers of further papers are now being received. Please send a title and short abstract (80-150 words) to Dr Emily Lyle by email as soon as possible for consideration by the advisory board which consists of Professor Rob Dunbar, Dr Emily Lyle, Professor Wilson McLeod, and Dr John Shaw. The full programme is likely to be available by 1 August. Details will be sent to those who register and will be announced on the web.


    • Fri
    • 20
    • Nov
    • 2015

    • Sat
    • 21
    • Nov
    • 2015

  • symposium
  • Tionól

Tionól 2015

Dublin, Ireland 10 Burlington Road, Dublin 4

Call for papers
The closing date (21 August 2015) has expired

    • Fri
    • 20
    • Nov
    • 2015

    • Sun
    • 22
    • Nov
    • 2015

  • conference
  • Imbas

Imbas 2015

Galway, Ireland

Imbas: The NUIG Interdisciplinary Postgraduate Medieval Conference [...] was established in November 2008 to help provide students of medieval studies with an exciting opportunity to gather for an extensive three day event. We offer delegates the opportunity to publish their papers in the Imbas Journal. Postgraduate students at any stage of their research are invited to attend and participate at the conference.

Call for papers
Closing date: 15 September

    • Mon
    • 04
    • Jul
    • 2016

    • Thu
    • 07
    • Jul
    • 2016

  • congress
  • International Medieval Congress

23rd International Medieval Congress: Food, Feast & Famine

Leeds, UK

Call for papers
Closing date:
The Online Proposal Form will be available from 31 May 2015.

The IMC seeks to provide an interdisciplinary forum for the discussion of all aspects of Medieval Studies. Paper and session proposals on any topic related to the European Middle Ages are welcome. However, every year, the IMC chooses a special thematic strand which - for 2016 - is 'Food, Feast & Famine'. The theme has been chosen for the crucial importance of both phenomena in social and intellectual discourse, both medieval and modern, as well as their impact on many aspects of the human experience.

Food is both a necessity and a marker of economic and social privilege. Who cooks food, who consumes it in the Middle Ages? How and what did people from different social levels or religious commitments eat? How did eating change? How were these issues contested and represented? What does food reveal about differing aspects of medieval society and culture?

The aim is to cover the entire spectrum of famine to feast through multi-disciplinary approaches. Study of the medieval economy raises issues about standards of living and nutritional health. Both archaeological as well as textual evidence have been used to explore crop yields, agricultural methods, transport problems, dearth, and famine. Geographical and social variations in diet are important for understanding medieval taste and the era's definitions of sufficiency and luxury. Food is an expression of international relations and trade, as shown in the intercultural influences between Christian Europe and Islamic Spain, North Africa, the Eastern Mediterranean, and India.

Across medieval Europe the acquisition, preservation, and storage of food was a struggle for much of the population, but food consumption was also a means for a clerical and noble elite to display taste and ostentation. In popular culture, feasting is perceived as one of the major activities of the medieval elite. The religious significance of food and fasting in the Middle Ages was part of Christian, Muslim, and Jewish practice. Fasting and food had wide-ranging interconnections with piety and charity, and could involve renunciation of an exceptional intensity. Spiritual and physical nourishment and its absence can be explored in many disciplines from the theological, legal, and literary to the art historical and linguistic.