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Events



    • Wed
    • 01
    • Jul
    • 2015

    • Fri
    • 03
    • Jul
    • 2015

  • conference
  • Irish Conference of Medievalists

29th Irish Conference of Medievalists

Dublin, Ireland University College Dublin

The Irish Conference of Medievalists (ICM) was established in 1987 and has met yearly ever since. It is one of the longest running conferences of its type. Since the beginning, the ICM has had the purpose of showcasing the latest research in both Irish and international medieval studies. The ICM welcomes speakers from Ireland and abroad on all aspects of the Middle Ages.

[...]

The 29th ICM is delighted to announce the plenary speaker for this year’s conference. Dr Rob Meens (Universiteit Utrecht) will be giving the keynote paper, which is entitled ‘Columbanus and the Practice of Penance in Early Medieval Europe’. Given that this year is the 1400th anniversary of the death of Columbanus, this is especially appropriate.

Dr Meens is a distinguished scholar with many publications. He is particularly noted for his work on penance and the penitentials but has also published on a variety of topics related to canon law and the practice of preaching. His ground-breaking monograph, Penance in the Middle Ages, 600-1200 (Cambridge 2014), appeared recently. It is with great pleasure that we welcome him to the 29th ICM.

Call for papers
The closing date (20 April 2015) has expired

    • Sat
    • 04
    • Jul
    • 2015
13:30-17:00
  • lectures
  • CIRDoMoC Journées d’étude annuelle

CIRDoMoC: Journées d’étude annuelle 2015

Landévennec, Brittany, France

Le programme se compose ainsi :

13h30 Comptes-rendus d’activité pour l’année 2014 et Assemblée générale

14h00 Alain Dubreucq (Professeur d’histoire médiévale à l’Université Jean-Moulin (Lyon 3), Directeur du CERCOR (Saint-Étienne)): La tradition manuscrite des Lettres et des Instructions de saint Colomban.

15h00 Patrick Galliou (Professeur émérite à l’Université de Bretagne occidentale (CRBC), Fellow de la Society of Antiquaries of London) : À propos des aspects militaires de la migration bretonne.

16h00 Stéphane Lebecq (Professeur d’histoire médiévale Université de Lille 3 (CRHEN-O)) : Tout près du but : la publication du Cartulaire de Saint-Guénolé de Landévennec.

17h00 Réunion du Conseil d’administration


    • Mon
    • 06
    • Jul
    • 2015

    • Thu
    • 09
    • Jul
    • 2015

  • congress
  • International Medieval Congress

22nd International Medieval Congress: Reform and Renewal

Leeds, UK

The International Medieval Congress (IMC) is organised and administered by the Institute for Medieval Studies (IMS). Since its start in 1994, the Congress has established itself as an annual event with an attendance of over 2,000 medievalists from all over the world. It is the largest conference of its kind in Europe.

Drawing medievalists from over 50 countries, with over 1,800 individual papers and 650 academic sessions and a wide range of concerts, performances, readings, round tables, excursions, bookfair and associated events, the Leeds International Medieval Congress is Europe's largest annual gathering in the humanities.

[...]

...every year, the IMC chooses a special thematic strand which - for 2015 - is 'Reform and Renewal'. The theme has been chosen for the crucial importance of both phenomena in social and intellectual discourse, both medieval and modern, as well as their impact on many aspects of the human experience.

The changes brought about by deliberate individual and collective interventions demonstrate the impact of reform and renewal on the development of spirituality, ideologies, institutional and socio-economic realities, literary and artistic expression, and a sense of shared identity amongst communities. Change could be justified by referring rhetorically to a 'restoration' or 'renewal' of a perceived former reality. Monastic and ecclesiastical groups regarded spiritual and institutional reform as closely interconnected. Secular rulers invoked divine will and natural order to validate interventions in political and socio-economic structures. Innovators in literary and artistic spheres referred to a desire to return to a more 'authentic' or 'original' intellectual, spiritual, or aesthetic experience. In reality, reform and renewal could be profoundly radical but could also be more ambigiuous, remaining virtually unnoticed by contemporaries. Medieval commentators' tendency to append positive and negative connotations to accounts of reform and renewal continues to impact upon modern discussions of both phenomena and their rhetorical uses.


    • Mon
    • 13
    • Jul
    • 2015

    • Fri
    • 17
    • Jul
    • 2015

  • Congress
  • International Congress of Celtic Studies

15th International Congress of Celtic Studies

Glasgow, Scotland University of Glasgow

Dit internationale congres wordt in 2015 voor de vijftiende keer georganiseerd, deze keer door de Universiteit van Glasgow.
ICCC.png

The International Congress of Celtic Studies is the foremost international gathering of scholars researching the languages, literatures and cultural traditions of the Celtic-speaking peoples. Held once every four years, the Congress provides a forum in which experts from across the full range of Celtic Studies— including linguistics, literature, history, archaeology and art history—come together to share the fruits of their work.

The 15th International Congress of Celtic Studies will be held at the University of Glasgow from 13-17 July 2015.

Call for papers
The closing date (1 November 2014) has expired

    • Sat
    • 01
    • Aug
    • 2015

    • Sat
    • 08
    • Aug
    • 2015

  • festival
  • National Eisteddfod of Wales

National Eisteddfod of Wales 2015

Montgomeryshire, Wales, UK


    • Sat
    • 22
    • Aug
    • 2015

    • Tue
    • 25
    • Aug
    • 2015

  • conference
  • Monastic Europe Conference

Monastic Europe Conference 2015: Landscape & Settlement

Ennis, Co. Clare, Ireland

The Irish Research Council-funded Monastic Europe: Landscape and Settlement project is a research partnership between the Department of the History of Art and Architecture, Trinity College Dublin, the Discovery Programme and the Department of History, University College Cork. The project is examining the unusually well preserved remains of late medieval monastic buildings in Ireland within their broader European context, with a particular emphasis on their architecture and impact on the landscape around them.

The project team pleased to announce an international conference, to be held 22nd – 25th August in Ennis, Co. Clare, Ireland. Located in an area rich with the medieval buildings of the European monastic orders, the conference will balance sessions of papers with a number site visits, and will stimulate a focused academic debate on the impact of monasticism in shaping the development of the physical environment across Europe between c.1100 and c.1700.

Conference themes will include:

  • The topography of medieval monastic settlement (1100-1700), in both urban and rural environments
  • The impact of Church reforms on the physical structures and landscapes of the monastic Church
  • Monastic space (liturgical, social and architectural aspects)
  • Patronage networks
  • Architecture and identities
  • Written sources for understanding the monastic environment

    • Thu
    • 27
    • Aug
    • 2015

    • Fri
    • 28
    • Aug
    • 2015

  • conference

Ó Longáin Conference

Cork, Ireland Main Campus, Room WW6

The first ever major conference to discuss the work of the Ó Longáin family of scribes, their circle and historic context will be held at UCC on August 27/28 2015. Speakers will include Breandán Ó Conchúir, Timothy O’Neill, David Dickson, Joan Rockley, Margaret Lantry, Siobhán Fitzpatrick, John Mulcahy, Meidhbhín Ní Úrdail, and Pádraig Ó Macháin. This conference is funded through a generous donaton in memory of Frances Atkins.

Admission is free, but please indicate your intention to attend by emailing p.omachain@ucc.ie


    • Wed
    • 02
    • Sep
    • 2015

    • Sat
    • 05
    • Sep
    • 2015

  • Conference
  • Annual Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists

21st Annual Meeting of the European Association of Archaeologists

Glasgow, Scotland

This year's meeting will include ‘Celtic connections’ as one of its central themes.

    • Thu
    • 08
    • Oct
    • 2015
5:00 pm
  • lecture
  • John V. Kelleher Lecture

John V. Kelleher Lecture 2015: Fergus Kelly

Cambridge, US Harvard Faculty Club, 20 Quincy Street


    • Fri
    • 09
    • Oct
    • 2015

    • Sun
    • 11
    • Oct
    • 2015

  • colloquium
  • Harvard Celtic Colloquium

35th Harvard Celtic Colloquium 2015

Cambridge, US The Thompson Room (Room 110), Barker Center, 12 Quincy Street

Since 1981, the graduate students of the Harvard Celtic Department have organized and hosted the Annual Harvard Celtic Colloquium and have published selected papers in The Proceedings of the Harvard Celtic Colloquium. The Colloquium attracts students and scholars from North America, Ireland, Great Britain and Europe, and welcomes paper proposals dealing with any aspect of the Celtic languages, their literatures and their cultures in any period, including papers with an interdisciplinary or theoretical perspective.

The Colloquium is held each year in October, and opens with the John V. Kelleher Memorial Lecture sponsored by the department on the Thursday afternoon of the Colloquium weekend.

Call for papers
The closing date (7 May 2015) has expired

    • Fri
    • 20
    • Nov
    • 2015

    • Sat
    • 21
    • Nov
    • 2015

  • symposium
  • Tionól

Tionól 2015

Dublin, Ireland 10 Burlington Road, Dublin 4

Call for papers
Closing date: 21 August 2015

This year’s Tionól will take place at the School of Celtic Studies, 10 Burlington Road, Dublin 4, on 20 and 21 November. Papers will relate to any aspect of Celtic Studies, and will be 30 minutes in duration. We would be grateful to anyone who intends offering a paper for this Tionól if they would submit details of the following:

  • proposed title of paper
  • abstract of paper (in writing or as an e-mail attachment)
  • notice of any lecturing aids that may be required

The programme for the Tionól will be finalised in the autumn, and will then be circulated, and will appear on this site. The deadline for submission of papers is Friday 21st August. Submissions should be marked for attention of Tionól, School of Celtic Studies, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 10 Burlington Rd., Dublin 4, or emailed to tionol@celt.dias.ie.


Beidh Tionól na bliana seo ar siúl ar an 20ú agus 21ú Samhain. Léifear páipéir a bhaineann le gné ar bith den Léann Ceilteach, agus a mhairfidh leathuair an chloig. Daoine a mbeadh ar intinn acu páipéar a léamh sa Tionól seo, bheimís buíoch díobh ach an t-eolas seo a lua linn:

  • teideal an pháipéir
  • achoimre an pháipéir (i scríbhinn, nó mar iatán ríomhphostais)
  • áiseanna a bheadh ag teastáil

Socrófar clár an Tionóil sa bhfómhar, cuirfear in úil ansin do chách é, agus foilseofar ar shuíomh idirlín na Scoile é. Dé hAoine 21ú Lúnasa, an sprioc. Moltar iarratais a chur ar aghaidh go dtí Tionól, Scoil an Léinn Cheiltigh, Institiúid Ard-Léinn Bhaile Átha Cliath, 10 Bóthar Burlington, Baile Átha Cliath 4, nó tríd an ríomhphost go dtí tionol@celt.dias.ie.


    • Fri
    • 20
    • Nov
    • 2015

    • Sun
    • 22
    • Nov
    • 2015

  • conference
  • Imbas

Imbas 2015

Galway, Ireland

Imbas: The NUIG Interdisciplinary Postgraduate Medieval Conference [...] was established in November 2008 to help provide students of medieval studies with an exciting opportunity to gather for an extensive three day event. We offer delegates the opportunity to publish their papers in the Imbas Journal. Postgraduate students at any stage of their research are invited to attend and participate at the conference.

Call for papers
Closing date: 15 September

    • Mon
    • 04
    • Jul
    • 2016

    • Thu
    • 07
    • Jul
    • 2016

  • congress
  • International Medieval Congress

23rd International Medieval Congress: Food, Feast & Famine

Leeds, UK

Call for papers
Closing date:
The Online Proposal Form will be available from 31 May 2015.

The IMC seeks to provide an interdisciplinary forum for the discussion of all aspects of Medieval Studies. Paper and session proposals on any topic related to the European Middle Ages are welcome. However, every year, the IMC chooses a special thematic strand which - for 2016 - is 'Food, Feast & Famine'. The theme has been chosen for the crucial importance of both phenomena in social and intellectual discourse, both medieval and modern, as well as their impact on many aspects of the human experience.

Food is both a necessity and a marker of economic and social privilege. Who cooks food, who consumes it in the Middle Ages? How and what did people from different social levels or religious commitments eat? How did eating change? How were these issues contested and represented? What does food reveal about differing aspects of medieval society and culture?

The aim is to cover the entire spectrum of famine to feast through multi-disciplinary approaches. Study of the medieval economy raises issues about standards of living and nutritional health. Both archaeological as well as textual evidence have been used to explore crop yields, agricultural methods, transport problems, dearth, and famine. Geographical and social variations in diet are important for understanding medieval taste and the era's definitions of sufficiency and luxury. Food is an expression of international relations and trade, as shown in the intercultural influences between Christian Europe and Islamic Spain, North Africa, the Eastern Mediterranean, and India.

Across medieval Europe the acquisition, preservation, and storage of food was a struggle for much of the population, but food consumption was also a means for a clerical and noble elite to display taste and ostentation. In popular culture, feasting is perceived as one of the major activities of the medieval elite. The religious significance of food and fasting in the Middle Ages was part of Christian, Muslim, and Jewish practice. Fasting and food had wide-ranging interconnections with piety and charity, and could involve renunciation of an exceptional intensity. Spiritual and physical nourishment and its absence can be explored in many disciplines from the theological, legal, and literary to the art historical and linguistic.