Bibliography

Dáibhí (Dáibhí Iarla)
Ó Cróinín
s. xx / s. xxi

61 publications between 1981 and 2018 indexed
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Works authored

Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, Whitley Stokes (1830-1909). The lost Celtic notebooks rediscovered, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2011.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, Early Irish history and chronology, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2003.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, Early medieval Ireland, 400–1200, Longman History of Ireland, London: Longman, 1995.
Bischoff, Bernhard, Latin palaeography: antiquity and the Middle Ages, tr. Dáibhí Ó Cróinín, and David Ganz, original title: Paläographie des römischen Altertums und des abendländischen Mittelalters (1979), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990.
Walsh, Maura, and Dáibhí Ó Cróinín, Cummian’s letter De controversia Paschali: together with a related Irish computistical tract De ratione conputandi, Studies and Texts 86, Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, 1988.
CELT – De controversia Paschali, text (pp. 56–96): <link> CELT – De controversia Paschali, translation (pp. 57–95): <link>
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, Evangeliarum Epternacense (Universitätsbibliothek Augsburg, Cod. I.2.4° 2). Evangelistarium (Erzbischöfliches Priesterseminar St. Peter, Cod. ms. 25), Codices illuminati medii aevi 9, Munich: Helga Lengenfelder, 1988.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí [ed.], The Irish Sex aetates mundi, Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1983.

Works edited

Warntjes, Immo, and Dáibhí Ó Cróinín (eds), Late antique calendrical thought and its reception in the early Middle Ages: proceedings from the 3rd International Conference on the Science of Computus in Ireland and Europe, Galway, 16-18 July, 2010, Studia Traditionis Theologiae 26, Turnhout: Brepols, 2017.  
abstract:
Late antique and early medieval science is commonly defined by the quadrivium, the four subjects of the seven liberal arts relating to natural science: astronomy, geometry, arithmetic, and music. The seven-fold division of learning was designed in Late Antiquity by authors such as Martianus Capella, and these authors were studied intensively from the Carolingian age onwards. Because these subjects still have currency today, this leads to the anachronistic view that the artes dominated intellectual thought in Late Antiquity and the early Middle Ages. Quite the contrary, the artes were an idealized curriculum with limited application in practice. Certainly, the artes do not help in our understanding of the intellectual endeavour between the early fifth and the late eighth centuries. This period was dominated by computus, a calendrical science with the calculation of Easter at its core. Only computus provides a traceable continuation of scientific thought from Late Antiquity to the early Middle Ages. The key questions were the mathematical modeling of the course of the sun through the zodiac (the Julian calendar) and of the moon phases (in various lunar calendars). This volume highlights key episodes in the transmission of calendrical ideas in this crucial period, and therewith helps explaining the transformation of intellectual culture into its new medieval Christian setting.
abstract:
Late antique and early medieval science is commonly defined by the quadrivium, the four subjects of the seven liberal arts relating to natural science: astronomy, geometry, arithmetic, and music. The seven-fold division of learning was designed in Late Antiquity by authors such as Martianus Capella, and these authors were studied intensively from the Carolingian age onwards. Because these subjects still have currency today, this leads to the anachronistic view that the artes dominated intellectual thought in Late Antiquity and the early Middle Ages. Quite the contrary, the artes were an idealized curriculum with limited application in practice. Certainly, the artes do not help in our understanding of the intellectual endeavour between the early fifth and the late eighth centuries. This period was dominated by computus, a calendrical science with the calculation of Easter at its core. Only computus provides a traceable continuation of scientific thought from Late Antiquity to the early Middle Ages. The key questions were the mathematical modeling of the course of the sun through the zodiac (the Julian calendar) and of the moon phases (in various lunar calendars). This volume highlights key episodes in the transmission of calendrical ideas in this crucial period, and therewith helps explaining the transformation of intellectual culture into its new medieval Christian setting.
Warntjes, Immo, and Dáibhí Ó Cróinín (eds), The Easter controversy of Late Antiquity and the early Middle Ages: its manuscripts, texts, and tables. Proceedings of the 2nd International Conference on the Science of Computus in Ireland and Europe, Galway, 18–20 July, 2008, Studia Traditionis Theologiae 10, Turnhout: Brepols, 2011.
Warntjes, Immo, and Dáibhí Ó Cróinín (eds.), Computus and its cultural context in the Latin West, AD 300–1200: Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on the Science of Computus in Ireland and Europe, Studia Traditionis Theologiae 5, Turnhout: Brepols, 2010.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí [ed.], A new history of Ireland, vol. 1: Prehistoric and early Ireland, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005.
Barnard, Toby, Dáibhí Ó Cróinín, and Katharine Simms (eds.), ‘A miracle of learning’: studies in manuscripts and Irish learning. Essays in honour of William O’Sullivan, Aldershot: Ashgate, 1998.

Contributions to journals

Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “The earliest Irish and English books: time for a reappraisal?”, Peritia 28 (2017): 227–236.  
abstract:
The Schaffhausen codex of Adomnán of Iona’s Vita Sancti Columbae, and the manuscript now known as St Cuthbert’s Gospel, are two of the most iconic manuscripts in the Insular tradition of book-production. The recent publication of a facsimile of the Schaffhausen MS., and of a collection of essays on the Cuthbert codex, offers an opportunity to reassess the opinions and views expressed by scholars on the subject in the last fifty years.
abstract:
The Schaffhausen codex of Adomnán of Iona’s Vita Sancti Columbae, and the manuscript now known as St Cuthbert’s Gospel, are two of the most iconic manuscripts in the Insular tradition of book-production. The recent publication of a facsimile of the Schaffhausen MS., and of a collection of essays on the Cuthbert codex, offers an opportunity to reassess the opinions and views expressed by scholars on the subject in the last fifty years.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “Tagebuch eines Iren”, Keltische Forschungen 2 (2007): 27–30.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “A new Old Irish gloss in a Munich manuscript”, Éigse 33 (2002): 75–76.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “An Eriugenian miscellany in a Munich manuscript?”, Peritia 16 (2002): 242–249.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “A new seventh-century Irish commentary on Genesis”, Sacris Erudiri 40 (2001): 231–265.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “Bischoff’s Wendepunkte fifty years on”, Revue Bénédictine 110 (2000): 204–237.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “Who was Palladius, ‘first bishop of the Irish’?”, Peritia 14 (2000): 205–237.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “Bernhard Bischoff (1906–91): a memoir”, Peritia 10 (1996): 123–135.
Borsje, Jacqueline, and Dáibhí Ó Cróinín, “A monster in the Indian Ocean”, Nederlands Theologisch Tijdschrift 49 (1995): 1–11.
Mc Carthy, Daniel P., and Dáibhí Ó Cróinín, “The ‘lost’ Irish 84-year Easter table rediscovered”, Peritia 6–7 (1987–1988): 227–242.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “The Irish abroad in medieval Europe [Review of: Löwe, Heinz [ed.], Die Iren und Europa im früheren Mittelalter, 2 vols, Veröffentlichungen des Europa-Zentrums Tübingen. Kulturwissenschaftliche Reihe, Stuttgart: Klett-Cotta, 1982]”, Peritia 5 (1986): 445–452.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “New light on Palladius”, Peritia 5 (1986): 276–283.  
abstract:
Palladius, the earliest dateable figure in the history of the Irish church, has been generally treated as a ‘lost’ character, and almost all trace of the ‘Palladian’ church is believed to have disappeared. This paper argues that one text intimately associated with Palladius, his Easter table, has in fact survived and was known to Hiberno-Latin writers in the seventh century. The principles of that table are here reconstructed and its importance for the history of early Irish contacts with the continent is demonstrated.
abstract:
Palladius, the earliest dateable figure in the history of the Irish church, has been generally treated as a ‘lost’ character, and almost all trace of the ‘Palladian’ church is believed to have disappeared. This paper argues that one text intimately associated with Palladius, his Easter table, has in fact survived and was known to Hiberno-Latin writers in the seventh century. The principles of that table are here reconstructed and its importance for the history of early Irish contacts with the continent is demonstrated.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “‘New heresy for old’: Pelagianism in Ireland and the papal letter of 640”, Speculum 60 (1985): 505–516.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “Rath Melsigi, Willibrord and the earliest Echternach manuscripts”, Peritia 3 (1984): 17–49.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, and M. A. G. Ó Tuathaigh, “Festschrift Breatnach [Review of: de Brún, Pádraig, Seán Ó Coileáin, and Pádraig Ó Riain (eds.), Folia Gadelica: essays presented by former students to R. A. Breatnach on the occasion of his retirement from the professorship of Irish language and literature at University College, Cork, Cork: Cork University Press, 1983]”, Peritia 3 (1984): 585–589.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “Early Irish annals from Easter tables: a case restated”, Peritia 2 (1983): 74–86.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “Note: A fragment of Irish annals”, Peritia 2 (1983): 58.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “The Irish provenance of Bede’s computus”, Peritia 2 (1983): 229–247.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “Sticks and stones: a reply”, Peritia 2 (1983): 257–260.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “Donatus. Finit Amen [Review of: Holtz, Louis, Donat et la tradition de l’enseignement grammatical: étude sur l’Ars Donati et sa diffusion (IVe-IXe siècle) et édition critique, Documents, études et répertoires publiés par l’Institut de Recherche et d’Histoire des Textes, Paris: C.N.R.S., 1981]”, Peritia 2 (1983): 307–311.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “Note: Hiberno-Latin Calcenterus”, Peritia 1 (1982): 296–297.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “A seventh-century Irish computus from the circle of Cummianus”, Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy 82 C (1982): 405–430.  
abstract:
The Letter of Cummian on the Paschal question (c. A.D. 632) has long been recognised as one of the primary historical documents of the early Irish churches. The purpose of this paper is to show that a computus in Brussels, Bibliothèque royale, MS 5413-22, is the work either of Cummian himself or of a member of his immediate circle, and therefore represents an important new witness to the state of scientific learning in seventh-century Ireland.
abstract:
The Letter of Cummian on the Paschal question (c. A.D. 632) has long been recognised as one of the primary historical documents of the early Irish churches. The purpose of this paper is to show that a computus in Brussels, Bibliothèque royale, MS 5413-22, is the work either of Cummian himself or of a member of his immediate circle, and therefore represents an important new witness to the state of scientific learning in seventh-century Ireland.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “Mo-Sinnu moccu Min and the computus of Bangor”, Peritia 1 (1982): 281–295.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “The oldest Irish names for the days of the week?”, Ériu 32 (1981): 95–114.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “An Old Irish gloss in the Munich computus”, Éigse 18:2 (1981): 289–290.

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “The political background to Columbanus’s Irish career”, in: O'Hara, Alexander (ed.), Columbanus and the peoples of post-Roman Europe, Oxford Studies in Late Antiquity, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018. 53–68.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “Archbishop James Ussher (1581–1656) and the history of the Easter controversy”, in: Warntjes, Immo, and Dáibhí Ó Cróinín (eds), Late antique calendrical thought and its reception in the early Middle Ages: proceedings from the 3rd International Conference on the Science of Computus in Ireland and Europe, Galway, 16-18 July, 2010, Studia Traditionis Theologiae 26, Turnhout: Brepols, 2017. 309–351.  
abstract:
Archbishop James Ussher is probably best known for his reckoning of the date of the creation of the world (at the beginning of the night preceeding 23 October 4004 BC). However, his calculations were all based on a meticulous study of the Old Testament and other early Christian and non-Christian chronographical writings. This paper announces the discovery of a previously-unnoticed Oxford manuscript that lists the impressive array of patristic and post-patristic writings on the subject of the early Easter controversy that he accumulated for his researches.
abstract:
Archbishop James Ussher is probably best known for his reckoning of the date of the creation of the world (at the beginning of the night preceeding 23 October 4004 BC). However, his calculations were all based on a meticulous study of the Old Testament and other early Christian and non-Christian chronographical writings. This paper announces the discovery of a previously-unnoticed Oxford manuscript that lists the impressive array of patristic and post-patristic writings on the subject of the early Easter controversy that he accumulated for his researches.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “The earliest Echternach liturgical manuscript fragments: Irish or Anglo-Saxon?”, in: Moss, Rachel, Felicity O'Mahony, and Jane Maxwell (eds), An Insular odyssey: manuscript culture in early Christian Ireland and beyond, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2017. 55–75.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “Saints, scholars and science in early medieval Ireland”, in: Kelly, Mary, and Charles Doherty (eds), Music and the stars: mathematics in medieval Ireland, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2013. 13–20.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “Eól dam seiser cloinne Cuinn: the fortunes of a twelfth-century Irish syncretistic poem”, in: Sheehan, Sarah, Joanne Findon, and Westley Follett (eds.), Gablánach in scélaigecht: Celtic studies in honour of Ann Dooley, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2013. 198–219.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “The continuity of the Irish computistical tradition”, in: Warntjes, Immo, and Dáibhí Ó Cróinín (eds.), Computus and its cultural context in the Latin West, AD 300–1200: Proceedings of the 1st International Conference on the Science of Computus in Ireland and Europe, Studia Traditionis Theologiae 5, Turnhout: Brepols, 2010. 324–347.  
abstract:
It is well known that the study of computus in Ireland in the sixth and seventh centuries was at a level not equaled anywhere else in Europe, with the possible exception of Visigothic Spain. Not so well known, however, is the fact that computistics continued to thrive in Ireland, not only into the eighth and ninth centuries, but well beyond that. In fact, the eleventh and twelfth centuries saw a high-point of scholarly activity, in the related fields of chronology and chronography, both in Latin and in the vernacular. The best known Irish scholar of the period, Marianus Scottus of Fulda and Mainz, established a pattern for computistical and chronographical studies for centuries to come. This paper presents some of the evidence for that Blütezeit.
abstract:
It is well known that the study of computus in Ireland in the sixth and seventh centuries was at a level not equaled anywhere else in Europe, with the possible exception of Visigothic Spain. Not so well known, however, is the fact that computistics continued to thrive in Ireland, not only into the eighth and ninth centuries, but well beyond that. In fact, the eleventh and twelfth centuries saw a high-point of scholarly activity, in the related fields of chronology and chronography, both in Latin and in the vernacular. The best known Irish scholar of the period, Marianus Scottus of Fulda and Mainz, established a pattern for computistical and chronographical studies for centuries to come. This paper presents some of the evidence for that Blütezeit.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “The Cathach and Domnach Airgid”, in: Cunningham, Bernadette, Siobhán Fitzpatrick [eds.], and Petra Schnabel [picture ed.], Treasures of the Royal Irish Academy Library, Dublin: Royal Irish Academy, 2009. 1–8.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, F. J. Byrne, and Peter Harbison, “Bibliography”, in: Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí [ed.], A new history of Ireland, vol. 1: Prehistoric and early Ireland, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005. 996–1147.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “Ireland, 400–800”, in: Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí [ed.], A new history of Ireland, vol. 1: Prehistoric and early Ireland, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005. 182–234.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “Hiberno-Latin literature to 1169”, in: Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí [ed.], A new history of Ireland, vol. 1: Prehistoric and early Ireland, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005. 371–404.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “Bede’s Irish computus”, in: Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, Early Irish history and chronology, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2003. 201–212.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “The earliest Old Irish glosses”, in: Bergmann, Rolf, Elvira Glaser, and Claudine Moulin-Fankhänel (eds), Mittelalterliche volkssprachige Glossen: Internationale Fachkonferenz des Zentrums für Mittelalterstudien der Otto-Friedrich-Universität Bamberg, 2. bis 4. August 1999, Heidelberg: C. Winter, 2001. 7–31.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “Three weddings and a funeral: rewriting Irish political history in the tenth century”, in: Smyth, Alfred P. [ed.], Seanchas. Studies in early and medieval Irish archaeology, history and literature in honour of Francis J. Byrne, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2000. 212–224.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “The Old Irish and Old English glosses in Echternach manuscripts [with appendix on Old Breton glosses]”, in: Ferrari, Michele Camillo, Jean Schroeder, and Henri Trauffler (eds), Die Abtei Echternach 698–1998, Publications du CLUDEM 15, Echternach: CLUDEM, 1999. 85–101.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “Bernhard Bischoff (20.XII.1906-17.IX.1991)”, in: O'Loughlin, Thomas [ed.], The Scriptures and early medieval Ireland: proceedings of the 1993 Conference of the Society for Hiberno-Latin Studies on Early Irish Exegesis and Homilectics, Instrumenta Patristica 31, Steenbrugge, Turnhout: In Abbatia S. Petri; Brepols, 1999. 205–215.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “Prosopographical analysis of Táin bó Cuailnge in a historical setting”, in: Tristram, Hildegard L. C. [ed.], New methods in the research of epic / Neue Methoden der Epenforschung, ScriptOralia 107, Tübingen: Gunter Narr Verlag, 1998. 153–159.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “Lebar buide meic murchada”, in: Barnard, Toby, Dáibhí Ó Cróinín, and Katharine Simms (eds.), ‘A miracle of learning’: studies in manuscripts and Irish learning. Essays in honour of William O’Sullivan, Aldershot: Ashgate, 1998. 40–51.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “The computistical works of Columbanus”, in: Lapidge, Michael (ed.), Columbanus: studies on the Latin writings, Studies in Celtic History 17, Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 1997. 264–270.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “The Irish as mediators of antique culture on the continent”, in: Butzer, Paul Leo, and Dietrich Lohrmann (eds), Science in western and eastern civilization in Carolingian times, Basel: Birkhäuser Verlag, 1993. 41–52.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “Is the Augsburg gospel codex a Northumbrian manuscript?”, in: Bonner, Gerald, David Rollason, and Clare Stancliffe (eds), St Cuthbert, his cult and his community to AD 1200, Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 1989. 189–201.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “Early Echternach manuscript fragments with Old Irish glosses”, in: Kiesel, Georges, and Jean Schroeder (eds), Willibrord: Apostel der Niederlande, Gründer der Abtei Echternach: Gedenkgabe zum 1250. Todestag des angelsächsischen Missionars, Luxembourg: Imprimerie Saint-Paul, 1989. 135–143.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “The date, provenance, and earliest use of the works of Virgilius Maro Grammaticus”, in: Bernt, Günter, Fidel Rädle, and Gabriel Silagi (eds), Tradition und Wertung: Festschrift für Franz Brunhölzl zum 65. Geburtstag, Sigmaringen: Jan Thorbecke, 1989. 13–22.
Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí, “Cummianus Longus and the iconography of Christ and the apostles in early Irish literature”, in: Ó Corráin, Donnchadh, Liam Breatnach, and Kim R. McCone (eds.), Sages, saints and storytellers: Celtic studies in honour of Professor James Carney, Maynooth Monographs 2, Maynooth: An Sagart, 1989. 268–279.

As honouree

Moran, Pádraic, and Immo Warntjes (eds), Early medieval Ireland and Europe: chronology, contacts, scholarship. A Festschrift for Dáibhí Ó Cróinín, Studia Traditionis Theologiae 14, Turnhout: Brepols, 2015.  
abstract:
The pivotal role of Ireland in the development of a decidedly Christian culture in early medieval Europe has long been recognized. Still, Irish scholarship on early medieval Ireland has tended not to look beyond the Irish Sea, while continental scholars try to avoid Hibernica by reference to its special Celtic background. Following the lead of the honorand of this volume, Prof. Dáibhí Ó Cróinín, this collection of 27 essays aims at contributing to a reversal of this general trend. By way of introduction to the period, the first section deals with chronological problems faced by modern scholars as well as the controversial issues relating to the reckoning of time discussed by contemporary intellectuals. The following three sections then focus on Ireland’s interaction with its neighbours, namely Ireland in the insular world, continental influences in Ireland, and Irish influences on the Continent. The concluding section is devoted to modern scholarship and the perception of the Middle Ages in modern literature.
abstract:
The pivotal role of Ireland in the development of a decidedly Christian culture in early medieval Europe has long been recognized. Still, Irish scholarship on early medieval Ireland has tended not to look beyond the Irish Sea, while continental scholars try to avoid Hibernica by reference to its special Celtic background. Following the lead of the honorand of this volume, Prof. Dáibhí Ó Cróinín, this collection of 27 essays aims at contributing to a reversal of this general trend. By way of introduction to the period, the first section deals with chronological problems faced by modern scholars as well as the controversial issues relating to the reckoning of time discussed by contemporary intellectuals. The following three sections then focus on Ireland’s interaction with its neighbours, namely Ireland in the insular world, continental influences in Ireland, and Irish influences on the Continent. The concluding section is devoted to modern scholarship and the perception of the Middle Ages in modern literature.

As honouree

Moran, Pádraic, and Immo Warntjes (eds), Early medieval Ireland and Europe: chronology, contacts, scholarship. A Festschrift for Dáibhí Ó Cróinín, Studia Traditionis Theologiae 14, Turnhout: Brepols, 2015.