Texts

    verse beg. A gillu gairm n-ilgrada

    • Middle Irish
    • verse
    • Early Irish poetry
    Middle Irish poem attributed to Flann Mainistrech on the names belonging to a certain ‘people of a burdensome company’ (muinter na tromdáma), who are once described as a wicked or accursed people (munter mallacta).
    The nature and identity of those mentioned remain uncertain. Thurneysen tentatively suggests that the ‘half-demonic’ creatures refer to Midir and his toiling people of the síd as they occur in the third part of Tochmarc Étaíne. This tale, or the relevant episode, appears to be known by the title Tromdám Echach Aireman.n. 1 Rudolf Thurneysen, Die irische Helden- und Königsage bis zum siebzehnten Jahrhundert (1921): 256, who warns that the muinter is not to be confused (cf. Myles Dillon, ‘The Yew of the Disputing Sons’, Ériu 14 (1946): 154) with the retinue of the legendary poet Senchán Torpéist as known from the tale Tromdámh Guaire. The title Tromdám Echach Aireman is found in the introduction to the LU version of Orgain brudne Uí Dergae and in the section of so-called gnáthscéla in tale list B.
    Initial words (verse)
    • A gillu gairm n-ilgrada
    Ascribed to
    Flann MainistrechFlann Mainistrech (d. 1056) – Middle Irish poet ass. with Monasterboice (Mainistir Buite)
    See more
    Language
    • Middle Irish
    Form
    verse (primary)

    Classification

    Early Irish poetry

    Sources

    Notes

    Rudolf Thurneysen, Die irische Helden- und Königsage bis zum siebzehnten Jahrhundert (1921): 256, who warns that the muinter is not to be confused (cf. Myles Dillon, ‘The Yew of the Disputing Sons’, Ériu 14 (1946): 154) with the retinue of the legendary poet Senchán Torpéist as known from the tale Tromdámh Guaire. The title Tromdám Echach Aireman is found in the introduction to the LU version of Orgain brudne Uí Dergae and in the section of so-called gnáthscéla in tale list B.

    Primary sources Text editions and/or modern translations – in whole or in part – along with publications containing additions and corrections, if known. Diplomatic editions, facsimiles and digital image reproductions of the manuscripts are not always listed here but may be found in entries for the relevant manuscripts. For historical purposes, early editions, transcriptions and translations are not excluded, even if their reliability does not meet modern standards.

    [dipl. ed.] Best, Richard Irvine, Osborn Bergin, M. A. O'Brien, and Anne O'Sullivan (eds.), The Book of Leinster, formerly Lebar na Núachongbála, 6 vols, Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1954–1983.
    CELT – 1-260: <link> CELT – 400-470 (excl. Táin bó Cúailnge): <link> CELT – 471-638 and 663 (excl. Dinnshenchas Érenn): <link> CELT – 761-781 and 785-841 (excl. Dinnshenchas Érenn and Togail Troí): <link> CELT – 1119-1192 and 1202-1325 (excl. Esnada tige Buchet and Fingal Rónáin ): <link>
    Vol. 1: 110–111. direct link
    Edition wanted.
    No critical edition known.
    Translation wanted.
    No translation known.

    Secondary sources (select)

    Thurneysen, Rudolf, Die irische Helden- und Königsage bis zum siebzehnten Jahrhundert, Halle: Niemeyer, 1921.
    Internet Archive: <link>
    Contributors
    Dennis Groenewegen
    blog comments powered by Disqus