{
Texts

Angar kyfundawt
verse beg. Bard yman y mae

  • Middle Welsh
  • verse
  • Medieval Welsh poetry
Lengthy poem attributed to the legendary poet Taliesin.
Initial words (verse)
  • Bard yman y mae
Ascribed to
TaliesinTaliesin (fl. 6th century) – renowned British poet, known both as a historical poet at the court of Urien and other rulers and as a more fictionalised persona of supreme status. Poems attributed to him survive in the 14th-century manuscript now known as the Book of Taliesin (NLW Peniarth 2).
See more
Manuscripts
Language
  • Middle Welsh
Form
verse (primary)

Classification

Medieval Welsh poetry

Sources

Primary sources Text editions and/or modern translations – in whole or in part – along with publications containing additions and corrections, if known. Diplomatic editions, facsimiles and digital image reproductions of the manuscripts are not always listed here but may be found in entries for the relevant manuscripts. For historical purposes, early editions, transcriptions and translations are not excluded, even if their reliability does not meet modern standards.

[ed.] [tr.] Haycock, Marged [ed. and tr.], Legendary poems from the Book of Taliesin, Aberystwyth: CMCS Publications, 2007.
106 ff [‘4. Angar kyfundawt’]
[ed.] [tr.] Higley, Sarah Lynn, Between languages: the uncooperative text in Early Welsh and Old English nature poetry, University Park, Pa.: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1993.
[‘Appendix’]
[ed.] Evans, J. Gwenogvryn [ed.], Facsimile & text of the Book of Taliesin, 2 vols, Series of Old Welsh Texts 9, Llanbedrog, 1910.
Internet Archive – vol. 1: <link>, <link> Internet Archive – vol. 2: <link>, <link> Internet Archive – vol. 3: <link> Internet Archive – vol. 4: <link>
19.1–23.8 Diplomatic edition

Secondary sources (select)

Haycock, Marged, “Taliesin’s questions”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 33 (Summer, 1997): 19–80.
Higley, Sarah Lynn, Between languages: the uncooperative text in Early Welsh and Old English nature poetry, University Park, Pa.: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1993.
Contributors
Dennis Groenewegen
blog comments powered by Disqus