Bracken, Damian






Bibliography

Bracken, Damian, “Rationalism and the Bible in seventh-century Ireland”, Chronicon 2 (1998): 1–37.

  • journal article
Citation details
Contributor(s)
Article
“Rationalism and the Bible in seventh-century Ireland”
Periodical
Volume
2
Pages
1–37
Online resources
Archive
resource: Chronicon
Description
Abstract (cited)
An Irish writer of the mid-seventh century, Augustinus Hibernicus, tried to explain the unusual events of the Bible in rationalist way. His rationalism is not as unusual as some believe because he was applying arguments developed by patristic writers. He had, however, a certain independence of mind, especially in his avoidance of some of Augustine's ideas. Augustine's use of the theory of the rationes seminales has not influenced him. This is not because he was ignorant of the idea, but because it conflicted with his more consistent conception of creation and miracles.
Subjects and topics
Headings
Ireland c.400-c.800 Hiberno-Latin literature to c.1169 7th century
Sources
History, society and culture
Agents
Augustinus HibernicusAugustinus Hibernicus / Irish Augustine / Pseudo-Augustine ... Irish (fl. mid–7th c.) – theologian and author of the Hiberno-Latin treatise De mirabilibus sacrae scripturae, sometimes attributed to a certain Augustine, hence the use of the phrase Augustinus Hibernicus (the Irish Augustine) or Pseudo-Augustine.
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Other subjects
The Bible and its reception
Keywords
rationes seminales creation nature Hiberno-Latin early Ireland miracles Bible Genesis Augustine Gregory the Great
Contributors
Dennis Groenewegen