Cóemgen (var. Cáemgen, Caoimhghin, Caoimhin, Kevin) of Glendalough

  • d. c. 618
  • feast-day: 3 June
  • saints of Ireland
  • Glenn Dá Locha
patron saint of Glenn Dá Locha (Glendalough)
See also references for related subjects.
Lacey, Brian, “Monster and monastery: St Kevin’s Lives and the expansion of Glendalough”, in: Doherty, Charles, Linda Doran, and Mary Kelly (eds.), Glendalough: City of God, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2011. 165–174.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, A dictionary of Irish saints, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2011.  
Scarcely a parish in Ireland is without one or more dedications to saints, in the form of churches in ruins, holy wells or other ecclesiastical monuments. This book is a guide to the (mainly documentary) sources of information on the saints named in these dedications, for those who have an interest in them, scholarly or otherwise. The need for a summary biographical dictionary of Irish saints, containing information on such matters as feastdays, localisations, chronology, and genealogies, although stressed over sixty years ago by the eminent Jesuit and Bollandist scholar, Paul Grosjean, has never before been satisfied. Professor Ó Riain has been working in the field of Irish hagiography for upwards of forty years, and the material for the over 1,000 entries in his Dictionary has come from a variety of sources, including Lives of the saints, martyrologies, genealogies of the saints, shorter tracts on the saints (some of them accessible only in manuscripts), annals, annates, collections of folklore, Ordnance Survey letters, and other documents. Running to almost 700 pages, the body of the Dictionary is preceded by a preface, list of sources and introduction, and is followed by comprehensive indices of parishes, other places (mainly townlands), alternate (mainly anglicised) names, subjects, and feastdays.
Gundacker, Claudia, “Die Viten irischer Heiliger im Magnum legendarium Austriacum”, Diplomarbeit: Universität Wien, 2008. URL: <http://othes.univie.ac.at/907/1/2008-08-04_0003644.pdf>. 
abstract:
The so – called Great Austrian Legendary or Magnum Legendarium Austriacum is a collection of vitae sanctorum sanctarumque. It is exstant in several monasteries, namely Admont, Heiligenkreuz, Lilienfeld, Melk and Zwettl. There is even one more manuscript extant in the National Library of Austria. Within this collection, there is a significant number of originally Irish saints. Within this work I tried to give a picture of who these holy Irishmen and women were and why their lives should be included in this collection. This is not a thesis on which Irish saints are worshiped in Austria, although I included the cults of those MLA saints, that are being cried to. I also worked on a theory, that the Irish offspring of these twenty one saints does not play as much as an important a role in the studies on the MLA as has been promoted in literature. The second part of this thesis is dedicated to the vitae of three Irish saints to be found in the MLA.
  • St. Kevin of Glendalough: his life has not been edited yet, so I compiled a text using all manuscripts. Furthermore I wrote a commentary and translated the text.
  • St. Ite of Killeedy: her MLA life has already been the theme of a thesis written in Utrecht. I revised the text, added, commented and translated it into German.
  • St. Ronan: the MLA life was already published in 1898 in the Analecta Bollandiana. The editor did not use the manuscript of Zwettl. I compiled a text using three of four existing manuscripts, wrote explanatory notes and translated it.
Doherty, Charles, “Leinster, saints of (act. c.550–c.800)”, Oxford dictionary of national biography, Online: Oxford University Press. URL: <http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/51009>.
Grosjean, Paul, “Notes d’hagiographie celtique, no. 20: Les Vies latines de S. Cáemgen et de S. Patrice du manuscrit 121 des Bollandistes”, Analecta Bollandiana 70 (1952): 313–315.
Grosjean, Paul, “Notes d’hagiographie celtique, no. 13: Relations mutuelles des Vies latines de S. Cáemgen de Glenn Dá Locha”, Analecta Bollandiana 63 (1945): 122–129.