Dinnshenchas of Srúb Brain

From CODECS: Online Database and e-Resources for Celtic Studies
Dinnshenchas of Srúb Brain

    Dinnshenchas of Srúb Brain
    verse beg. Matan do Choin na Cerdda

    • Middle Irish
    • verse, prose
    • Early Irish poetry, Dinnshenchas Érenn, Ulster Cycle, Dinnshenchas
    Dinnshenchas of Srúb Brain. The placename is etymologised as ‘Raven’s Bill’ with reference to an account of how Cú Chulainn killed a multitude of giant ravens or black birds and placed the bill of the last bird on the rock (Srúb Brain).
    Initial words (verse)
    • Matan do Choin na Cerdda
    Context(s)
    The (textual) context(s) to which the present text belongs or in which it is cited in part or in whole.
    Language
    Middle Irish
    Form
    verse, prose (primary)
    Textual relationships
    The story deviates from an earlier tradition that accounts for the placename, or at least if it refers to the same place. In Immram Bran, Srúb Brain is thus called because it is where the voyager Bran returns from the Otherworld.

    Classification

    Early Irish poetry Dinnshenchas Érenn Ulster Cycle
     Dinnshenchas

    Subject tags

    Cú ChulainnCú Chulainn – Young Ulster hero and chief character of Táin bó Cuailnge and other tales of the Ulster Cycle; son of Súaltam or Lug and Deichtire (sister to Conchobor); husband of Emer (ingen Forgaill)
    See more
     Srúb Brain  Dún Delga  Ramann  Redg
    Contents

    A flock of black birds appears

    Summary:
    Prose. Cú Chulainn is at Dún Delga when he encounters a flock of black birds (3 x 50). These birds are extraordinarily large (measurements are given for their bills and their necks).

    Verse. One morning, Cú na Cerdda (i.e. Cú Chulainn) keeps watch at Dún Delga (ll. 1-4). He witnesses an enormous, "monstrous" flock of black birds (3 x 50) as it gathers over the sea. The sight of these birds and their hoarse cries are rather unpleasant. These birds are extraordinarily large (measurements are given for their bills and their necks).

    » People: Cú Chulainn

    Cú Chulainn chases and kills the birds

    Summary:
    Prose. Cú Chulainn pursues the birds from Dún Delga. In every land he traverses while doing so, he kills one of them with his sling.

    Verse. Cú na cath (i.e. Cú Chulainn) attacks the birds by Rámand and Redg (l. 32), using his sling to kill them. In whichever inlet (gaibél) he finds them, he kills them all in this manner.

    » People: Cú Chulainn

    Cú Chulainn and the last raven

    Summary:
    Prose: Cú Chulainn kills the last raven (branén) at Redg and Ramann. He decapitates the bird, bathes his hands in its blood, and places its bill/beak (srúb) on the rock, calling it Srúb Brain (‘Raven’s Bill’).

    Verse. Cú Chulainn kills the last raven (branén). He decapitates the bird and bathes his hands in its blood: “the cunning hero (in callait) wove each mystic sign (rún)” (tr. Gwynn). He places its bill/beak (srúb) on the rock known since that day as Srúb Brain (‘Raven’s Bill’); “every secret meaning (rún) is seen by reference to an exploit” (tr. Gwynn).

    » People: Cú Chulainn

    Tathus drecht dron-amhnus » entry

    » Comments: This poem about Cú Chulainn is added to several copies of the dinnshenchas of Srúb Brain.
    • Sources

    Primary sources
    Text editions and/or modern translations – in whole or in part – along with publications containing additions and corrections, if known. Diplomatic editions, facsimiles and digital image reproductions of the manuscripts are not always listed here but may be found in the entry for the relevant manuscript.

    [ed.] [tr.] Gwynn, E. J. [ed. and tr.], The metrical dindsenchas, 5 vols, vol. 3, Todd Lecture Series 10, Dublin: Hodges, Figgis, 1913.
    CELT – edition: <link> CELT – translation: <link> Internet Archive – vol. 3: <link> Internet Archive – vols. 1-3: <link>
    256–259 + ix (corr. for l. 32) [id. 48. ‘Srúb Brain’] direct link direct link direct link
    [ed.] [tr.] Gwynn, E. J., The metrical dindsenchas, 5 vols, vol. 5, Todd Lecture Series 12, Dublin: Hodges, Figgis, 1935.
    Internet Archive – vol. 5: <link>
    136 Revised translations for ll. 39 (tentative) and 42, both referring to rún. direct link
    [ed.] [tr.] Stokes, Whitley, “The prose tales in the Rennes dindshenchas”, Revue Celtique 15 (1894): 272–336, 418–484.
    TLH – edition (I, pp. 277-336): <link> TLH – translation (I): <link> TLH – edition (II, pp. 418-484): <link> TLH – translation (II): <link> Celtic Digital Initiative: <link> Internet Archive – 272–336: <link> Internet Archive – 272–336: <link> Internet Archive – 418–484: <link> Internet Archive – 418–484: <link>
    450 [id. 54. ‘Srub Brain’] direct link
    [ed.] [tr.] Stokes, Whitley, “Hibernica [VIII–X]”, Zeitschrift für vergleichende Sprachforschung auf dem Gebiete der indogermanischen Sprachen 33 (1895): 62–86.
    Internet Archive: <link>
    82 Edited and translated from TCD 1322 (H 3. 3)

    Secondary sources

    Hellmuth, Petra S., “The Dindshenchas and Irish literary tradition”, in: Carey, John, Máire Herbert, and Kevin Murray (eds.), Cín Chille Cúile: texts, saints and places. Essays in honour of Pádraig Ó Riain, Celtic Studies Publications 9, Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 2004. 116–126.
    Gwynn, E. J. [ed. and tr.], The metrical dindsenchas, 5 vols, vol. 3, Todd Lecture Series 10, Dublin: Hodges, Figgis, 1913.
    CELT – edition: <link> CELT – translation: <link> Internet Archive – vol. 3: <link> Internet Archive – vols. 1-3: <link>
    524 [id. 48. ‘Srúb Brain’] direct link

    Queried results

    if available
    Hellmuth, Petra S., “The Dindshenchas and Irish literary tradition”, in: Carey, John, Máire Herbert, and Kevin Murray (eds.), Cín Chille Cúile: texts, saints and places. Essays in honour of Pádraig Ó Riain, Celtic Studies Publications 9, Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 2004. 116–126.
    Gwynn, E. J., The metrical dindsenchas, 5 vols, vol. 5, Todd Lecture Series 12, Dublin: Hodges, Figgis, 1935.
    Internet Archive – vol. 5: <link>
    Gwynn, E. J. [ed. and tr.], The metrical dindsenchas, 5 vols, vol. 3, Todd Lecture Series 10, Dublin: Hodges, Figgis, 1913.
    CELT – edition: <link> CELT – translation: <link> Internet Archive – vol. 3: <link> Internet Archive – vols. 1-3: <link>
    Stokes, Whitley, “Hibernica [VIII–X]”, Zeitschrift für vergleichende Sprachforschung auf dem Gebiete der indogermanischen Sprachen 33 (1895): 62–86.
    Internet Archive: <link>
    Stokes, Whitley, “The prose tales in the Rennes dindshenchas”, Revue Celtique 15 (1894): 272–336, 418–484.
    TLH – edition (I, pp. 277-336): <link> TLH – translation (I): <link> TLH – edition (II, pp. 418-484): <link> TLH – translation (II): <link> Celtic Digital Initiative: <link> Internet Archive – 272–336: <link> Internet Archive – 272–336: <link> Internet Archive – 418–484: <link> Internet Archive – 418–484: <link>

    web page identifiers

    page name: Dinnshenchas of Srúb Brain
    page url: //www.vanhamel.nl/codecs/Dinnshenchas_of_Sr%C3%BAb_Brain
    page ID: 12767
    page ID tracker: //www.vanhamel.nl/codecs/Show:ID?id=12767

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