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Manuscripts

Dublin, Trinity College, MS 1298

pp. 376-456
  • Irish language
  • s. xv
  • Irish manuscripts
  • miscellany
  • vellum
Identifiers
Part of
Dublin, Trinity College, MS 1298 (H 2. 7, 1298) [s. xv]
Type
miscellany
Provenance and related aspects
Language
Irish language
Date
s. xv
15th century
Origin, provenance
Aisling Byrne (2013) has argued that the inclusion of the Irish adaptation of the Expugnatio Hibernica together with marginal notes by one Moris Mac Gerailt (Maurice Fitzgerald) elsewhere in the manuscript point to a Fitzgerald readership. Related marginalia are found in the preceding part of the composite manuscript (pp. 250, 365 and the final page).
Hands, scribes
Codicological information
Material
vellum

The list below has been collated from the table of contents (if available on this page)Progress in this area is being made piecemeal. Full and partial tables of contents are available for a small number of manuscripts. and incoming annotations concerning individual texts (again, if available).Whenever catalogue entries about texts are annotated with information about particular manuscript witnesses, these manuscripts can be queried for the texts that are linked to them.

Sources

See also the parent manuscript for further references.

Secondary sources (select)

Abbott, T. K., and E. J. Gwynn, Catalogue of the Irish manuscripts in the Library of Trinity College, Dublin, Dublin: Hodges, Figgis & Co, 1921.
Internet Archive: <link> Internet Archive: <link>
Fomin, Maxim, “A newly discovered fragment of the early Irish wisdom-text Tecosca Cormaic in TCD MS 1298 (H. 2. 7)”, in: Stalmaszczyk, Piotr, and Maxim Fomin (eds.), Dimensions and categories of Celticity: studies in literature and culture. Proceedings of the Fourth International Colloquium of the Learned Association Societas Celto-Slavica held at the University of Lódz between 13-15 September 2009, vol. 2, Studia Celto-Slavica 5, Lódz University Press, 2010. 159–169.
Byrne, Aisling, “Family, locality, and nationality: vernacular adaptations of the Expugnatio Hibernica in late medieval Ireland”, Medium Ævum 82:1 (2013): 101–118.
Contributors
User:CA ,Dennis Groenewegen
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