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Texts

Fingal Rónáin (also Aided Maelḟothartaig meic Rónáin)‘Rónán’s act of kinslaying’

  • Late Old Irish
  • Cycles of the Kings, Aideda
Language
  • Late Old Irish
  • Late Old Irish.(4)n. 4 “The absence of rhetorics and the length of the poems point to a comparatively late work; on the other hand, the language, consistent throughout, points to the end of the OIr. period, and the story [...] is given in the LL saga-list. All these considerations would suggest a date early in the tenth century”. David Greene, Fingal Rónáin and other stories (1955): 2. On the verse Greene and O'Connor remark that it “appears to belong to the Old Irish period, [but] there are some rhymes (fo-roígéne: fogéba: cúaine: úairi) that point to a later date”.

Date
Early 10th century (Greene)(1)n. 1 See Greene, op. cit. or late 9th century (Greene and O'Connor).(2)n. 2 “composed probably towards the end of the ninth century”. David Greene • Frank O'Connor, A golden treasury of Irish poetry, A.D. 600 to 1200 (1967): 93.
Textual relationships
In Irish tale list A, where it occurs among other aideda, the text is referred to under the title Aided Maelḟothartaig meic Rónáin. The story of Rónán's kinslaying is also the subject of a genealogical note which occurs in Oxford, Bodleian Library, MS Rawlinson B 502, 124b, and in a passage in Brussels MS 4641, p. 18.(3)n. 3 David Greene, Fingal Rónáin and other stories (1955): 2–3; both texts are edited on 11–12.

Classification

Cycles of the Kings
 Aideda
Contents
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Work in progress

Rónán, Eithne and Máel Fothartaig

Rónán and his new wife

The queen sends her handmaiden

Máel Fothartaig in Scotland

The cows of Aífe

Sources

Notes

See Greene, op. cit.
“composed probably towards the end of the ninth century”. David Greene • Frank O'Connor, A golden treasury of Irish poetry, A.D. 600 to 1200 (1967): 93.
David Greene, Fingal Rónáin and other stories (1955): 2–3; both texts are edited on 11–12.
“The absence of rhetorics and the length of the poems point to a comparatively late work; on the other hand, the language, consistent throughout, points to the end of the OIr. period, and the story [...] is given in the LL saga-list. All these considerations would suggest a date early in the tenth century”. David Greene, Fingal Rónáin and other stories (1955): 2.

Primary sources Text editions and/or modern translations – in whole or in part – along with publications containing additions and corrections, if known. Diplomatic editions, facsimiles and digital image reproductions of the manuscripts are not always listed here but may be found in entries for the relevant manuscripts. For historical purposes, early editions, transcriptions and translations are not excluded, even if their reliability does not meet modern standards.

[ed.] Greene, David [ed.], Fingal Rónáin and other stories, Mediaeval and Modern Irish Series 16, Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1955.
CELT – Fingal Rónáin (ed.): <link> CELT – Orgain Denna Ríg (ed.): <link> CELT – Esnada tige Buchet (ed.): <link> CELT – Orgguin trí mac Diarmata meic Cerbaill (ed.): <link>
[ed.] [tr.] Meyer, Kuno [ed. and tr.], “Fingal Rónáin”, Revue Celtique 13 (1892): 368–397. Corrigenda in Revue Celtique 17 (1896): 319.
CELT – translation (pp. 372–396): <link> Internet Archive: <link>
Edited from LL and variants from TCD 1337.
[ed.] [tr.] Greene, David, and Frank O'Connor [Michael O'Donovan], A golden treasury of Irish poetry, A.D. 600 to 1200, London: Macmillan, 1967.
Edition, with English translation, of the poetic dialogue beginning 'Is úar gaeth' ("The wind is cold").
[tr.] Thurneysen, Rudolf [tr.], “Ronans Sohnesmord”, in: Thurneysen, Rudolf [tr.], Sagen aus dem alten Irland, Berlin, 1901. 105–114.
CELT: <link> Internet Archive: <link>
Translation based on LL.
[tr.] Carey, John [tr.], “[Various contributions]”, in: Koch, John T., and John Carey (eds.), The Celtic Heroic Age. Literary sources for ancient Celtic Europe and early Ireland & Wales, Celtic Studies Publications 1, 4th ed. (1995), Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 2003. [Various].

Secondary sources (select)

Hollo, Kaarina, “Fingal Rónáin: The medieval Irish text as argumentative space”, in: Carey, John, Máire Herbert, and Kevin Murray (eds.), Cín Chille Cúile: texts, saints and places. Essays in honour of Pádraig Ó Riain, Celtic Studies Publications 9, Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 2004. 141–149.
Boll, Sheila, “Seduction, vengeance and frustration in Fingal Rónáin: the role of foster-kin in structuring the narrative”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 47 (Summer, 2004): 1–16.
Poppe, Erich, “Deception and self-deception in Fingal Rónáin”, Ériu 47 (1996): 137–151.
Ó Cathasaigh, Tomás, “The rhetoric of Fingal Rónáin”, Celtica 17 (1985): 123–144.
Ó Cathasaigh, Tomás, “Varia III: The trial of Mael Ḟothartaig”, Ériu 36 (1985): 177–180.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Honour and status in some Irish and Welsh prose tales”, Ériu 29 (1978): 123–141.
Dillon, Myles, The cycles of the kings, London: Oxford University Press, 1946.
42ff.
Contributors
Dennis Groenewegen
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