Finn and Gráinne

From CODECS: Online Database and e-Resources for Celtic Studies
Finn and Gráinne

    Finn and Gráinne

    • Middle Irish
    • prose
    • Finn Cycle, minor Irish prose tales
    Manuscripts
    Language
    • Middle Irish
    Form
    prose (primary)

    Classification

    Finn Cycle
     minor Irish prose tales (foscéla)

    Subject tags

    Finn mac CumaillFind úa Báiscni, Fionn mac Cumhaill (ass. time-frame: Finn mac Cumaill, Cormac mac Airt, Category:Finn Cycle) – Finn mac Cumaill (earlier mac Umaill?), Find úa Báiscni: central hero in medieval Irish and Scottish literature of the so-called Finn Cycle or Finn Cycle; warrior-hunter and leader of a fían
    See more
    • Sources

    Primary sources
    Text editions and/or modern translations – in whole or in part – along with publications containing additions and corrections, if known. Diplomatic editions, facsimiles and digital image reproductions of the manuscripts are not always listed here but may be found in the entry for the relevant manuscript.

    [ed.] [tr.] Corthals, Johan, “Die Trennung von Finn und Gráinne”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 49–50 (1997): 71–91.
    Text with translation into German.
    [ed.] [tr.] Meyer, Kuno [ed. and tr.], “Finn and Gráinne”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 1 (1897): 458–461.
    CELT – edition: <link> CELT – translation: <link> Internet Archive: <link>
    Text with translation into English.

    Lash, Elliott, POMIC: The parsed Old and Middle Irish corpus. Version 0.1, Online: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, School of Celtic Studies. URL: <https://www.dias.ie/celt/celt-publications-2/celt-the-parsed-old-and-middle-irish-corpus-pomic/>.
    Corthals, Johan, “Die Trennung von Finn und Gráinne”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 49–50 (1997): 71–91.
    Meyer, Kuno, “Introduction”, in: Meyer, Kuno, Fianaigecht: being a collection of hitherto inedited Irish poems and tales relating to Finn and his Fiana, Todd Lecture Series 16, London: Hodges, Figgis, 1910. v–xxxi.
    “Tenth century (xii-xxvii)”
    xii. Triad § 236 of Trecheng Breth Féne; xiii. (a) Poem by Cináed ua hArtacáin, beginning ‘Án sin, a maig Meic ind Óc’ (dinnshenchas of Brug na Bóinne I); xiii.(b) Poem by Cináed ua hArtacáin, beginning ‘Fianna bátar i nEmain’; xiv. (a) Poem beg. ‘Almu Lagen, les na Fían’ (dinnshenchas of Almu I); xiv. (b) Poem beg. ‘Almu robo cháem dia cois’ (dinnshenchas of Almu II); xv. Poem beg. ‘Fornocht do dún, a Druim nDen’ (dinnshenchas of Fornocht), attributed to Finn; xvi. Poem beg. ‘Sund dessid domunemar’ (dinnshenchas of Ráith Ésa); xvii. Poem beg. ‘Tipra Sen-Garmna fo a snas’ (dinnshenchas of Tipra Sengarmna); xviii. Finn and Gráinne; xix. Echtra Finn, containing a prose version of Finn and the phantoms; xx. Poem beg. ‘Echta Lagen for Leth Cuind’ (LL); xxi. (a) Poem beg. ‘Scél lem dúib’, found in the commentary to Amra Choluim Chille; xxi. (b) Poem beg. ‘Cétamon’, embedded within the Macgnímartha Find; xxii. Poem ascribed to Urard mac Coise, beginning ‘A Mór Maigne Moigi Siúil’; xxiii. Tochmarc Ailbe; xxiv. ‘Aithed Gráinne’, title in medieval Irish tale lists; xxv. Úath Beinne Étair; xxvi. ‘Uath Dercce Ferna’, known from the tale lists, but presumed lost; xxvii. (a) Aided Find (Egerton 92 fragment); xxvii. (b) a single quatrain preserved in LL, beg. ‘Rodíchned Find, ba fer tend’.
    Meyer, Kuno [ed. and tr.], “Finn and Gráinne”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 1 (1897): 458–461.
    CELT – edition: <link> CELT – translation: <link> Internet Archive: <link>

    web page identifiers

    page name: Finn and Gráinne
    page url: //www.vanhamel.nl/codecs/Finn_and_Gr%C3%A1inne
    page ID: 4237
    page ID tracker: //www.vanhamel.nl/codecs/Show:ID?id=4237

    Contributors
    Dennis Groenewegen
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