Fragmentary annals of Ireland

From CODECS: Online Database and e-Resources for Celtic Studies
Fragmentary annals of Ireland

    Fragmentary annals of Ireland

    • Late Middle Irish, Early Modern Irish
    • prose
    • Irish annals
    A fragmentarily preserved text of Irish annals and narrative expansions, possibly compiled in the 11th century and perhaps based on the lost Annals of Clonenagh (Radner). Five fragments now remain in a late, 17th-century transcript, each covering a part of the period between 573 and 914 and focusing on the province of Leinster.
    The uniquely preserved text in the Brussels manuscript was transcribed from a now lost manuscript written by Dubhaltach Óg Mac Fir Bhisigh for John Lynch. Dubhaltach's version was itself copied from what he called a 'broken book' of Giolla na Naornh Mac Áedhagáin. If the latter is identical with the ollamh of that name recorded in the annals and if he was the scribe (rather than merely the owner) of the manuscript, this book would seem to date to the early 15th century.
    Language
    • Late Middle Irish Early Modern Irish
    • late Middle Irish and Early Modern Irish
    Form
    prose (primary)
    verse (secondary)
    Textual relationships
    Radner suggests that the annals in Egerton 1782, known since O'Grady as the Mionannala, may go back to an exemplar which also served as a source text (though not directly) for the Fragmentary annals.
    n. 1 Joan N. Radner, Fragmentary annals of Ireland (1978): introduction.

    Classification

    Irish annals
    Contents

    Fragment 1 (s.a. 573–628 = §§ 1–18)

    Fragment 2 (s.a. 662–704 = §§ 19–167)

    Fragment 3 (s.a. 716–735 = §§ 168–232)

    Fragment 4 (s.a. 851–873 = §§ 233–410)

    Summary:
    Joan N. Radner, Fragmentary annals of Ireland (1978) has suggested that this part of the manuscript is primarily based on two texts: the Clonmacnoise chronicle (now lost) and for much of the pseudo-historical material, the Osraige chronicle. To a smaller extent, use was made of additional material. See also Clare Downham, ‘The good, the bad and the ugly’, The Medieval Chronicle 3 (2004).

    Fragment 5 (s.a. 906–914 = §§ 411–459)

    King tales

    The king-tales

    A number of annals have been expanded to include short narratives about the careers of kings, such as Suibne Menn, Fínnachta Fledach, Máelshechnaill mac Máele Ruanaid and Cerball mac Dúnlainge. The following titles do not occur in the text of the Fragmentary Annals, but they have been adopted from Dan M. Wiley's overview of the early Irish king-tales.
    n. 2 Dan M. Wiley, ‘An introduction to the early Irish king tales’ in Essays on the early Irish king tales... (2008).
    Some of them are also found in the Mionannala.
    Paragraphs (Radner) Sub anno Text

    Fragment 1

    § 4 s.a. 583 Aided Fheradaig Fhinn (The violent death of Feradach Finn)
    § 9 s.a. 605 Scéla Áedo Uaridnaig ⁊ Mura Othna (The story of Áed Uaridnach and Muru Othna)
    § 17 s.a. 615 Compert Suibni Minn (The conception and birth of Suibne Menn)

    Fragment 2

    § 67.i s.a. 677 Scéla Fínnachta ⁊ Ríg Fer Rois (The story of Fínnachta Fledach and the king of Fir Rois)
    § 67.ii s.a. 677 Scéla Fínnachta ⁊ Adomnáin (The story of Fínnachta Fledach and Adomnán)
    § 67.iii s.a. 677 Scéla Fínnachta ⁊ Cinn Fáelad (The story of Fínnachta Fledach and Cenn Fáelad)
    § 67.iv s.a. 677 Scéla Fínnachta ⁊ Moling ⁊ Adomnáin (The story of Fínnachta Fledach, Moling and Adomnán)
    § 150 s.a. 700 Scéla Írgalaig meic Conaing ⁊ Adomnáin (The story of Írgalach mac Conaing and Adomnán)
    § 158 s.a. 703 Cath Corainn (The battle of Corann)
    § 177 s.a. 721 Fáitsine Fergaile meic Máele Dúin (The prophecy of Fergaill mac Máele Dúin)
    § 178 s.a. 722 Cath Almaine (The battle of Allen)

    Fragment 3

    §§ 233-235 s.a. 851-852 Scéla Máelshechnaill ⁊ na nDanar (The story of Máelshechnaill [mac Máele Ruanaid] and the Danes)
    § 254 s.a. 852 (?) Scéla Cerbaill meic Dúnlainge ⁊ na nDanar (The story of Cerball mac Dúnlainge and the Danes)
    § 260 s.a. 858 Cath Cairn Lugdach (The battle of Carn Lugdach)
    § 260 s.a. 858 Scéla Máelshechnaill ⁊ Cerbaill meic Dúnlainge (The story of Máelshechnaill [mac Máele Ruanaid] and Cerball mac Dúnlainge)
    § 279 s.a. 860 Cath Maige Macha (The battle of Mag Macha)
    § 314 s.a. 864 Sluagad Cerbaill meic Dúnlainge co Mag Feimin (The hosting of Cerball mac Dúinlainge to Mag Feimin)
    § 338 s.a. 866 (?) Scéla Cennétig meic Gáethíne ⁊ na Lochlannach (The story of Cennétig mac Gáethíni and the Norwegians)
    § 366 s.a. 868 Cath Cille ua nDaigre (The battle of Cell ua nDaigre)
    § 387 s.a. 870 Togail Dúin Bolg (The destructon of Dún Bolg)
    § 423 s.a. 908 Cath Belaig Mugna (The battle of Belach Mugna)
    § 443 s.a. 912 (?) Éirge Osraige i cenn Diarmata meic Cerbaill (The revolt of the Osraige against Diarmat mac Cerbaill)
    • Sources

    Notes

    Joan N. Radner, Fragmentary annals of Ireland (1978): introduction.
    Dan M. Wiley, ‘An introduction to the early Irish king tales’ in Essays on the early Irish king tales... (2008).

    Primary sources
    Text editions and/or modern translations – in whole or in part – along with publications containing additions and corrections, if known. Diplomatic editions, facsimiles and digital image reproductions of the manuscripts are not always listed here but may be found in the entry for the relevant manuscript.

    [ed.] [tr.] Radner, Joan N. [ed. and tr.], Fragmentary annals of Ireland, Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1978.
    CELT – edition (2–182),: <link> CELT – translation (3–183): <link> CELT – introduction (vii–ix): <link>
    [ed.] [tr.] O'Donovan, John [ed. and tr.], Annals of Ireland: three fragments, Dublin: Irish Archaeological and Celtic Society, 1860.
    Internet Archive: <link> Internet Archive: <link> Internet Archive: <link> Internet Archive: <link>

    Secondary sources

    Hamel, A. G. van, “The foreign notes in the Three fragments of Irish annals”, Revue Celtique 36 (1915–1916): 1–22.
    Internet Archive: <link> Internet Archive: <link>
    Mac Niocaill, Gearóid, The medieval Irish annals, Medieval Irish History Series 3, Dublin: Dublin Historical Association, 1975.
    Mc Carthy, Daniel P., The Irish annals: their genesis, evolution and history, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2008.

    Queried results

    if available
    Ní Mhaonaigh, Máire, “Caraid tairisi: literary links between Ireland and England in the eleventh century”, in: Harlos, Axel, and Neele Harlos (eds), Adapting texts and styles in a Celtic context: interdisciplinary perspectives on processes of literary transfer in the middle ages: studies in honour of Erich Poppe, Studien und Texte zur Keltologie 13, Münster: Nodus Publikationen, 2016. 265–288.
    Mc Carthy, Daniel P., The Irish annals: their genesis, evolution and history, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2008.
    Davies, Morgan T., “Kings and clerics in some Leinster sagas”, Ériu 47 (1996): 45–66.
    Radner, Joan N. [ed. and tr.], Fragmentary annals of Ireland, Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1978.
    CELT – edition (2–182),: <link> CELT – translation (3–183): <link> CELT – introduction (vii–ix): <link>
    Mac Niocaill, Gearóid, The medieval Irish annals, Medieval Irish History Series 3, Dublin: Dublin Historical Association, 1975.
    Wainwright, F. T., “Duald’s ‘Three fragments’”, Scriptorium 2:1 (1948): 56–58.
    Persée: <link>
    Hamel, A. G. van, “The foreign notes in the Three fragments of Irish annals”, Revue Celtique 36 (1915–1916): 1–22.
    Internet Archive: <link> Internet Archive: <link>
    O'Donovan, John [ed. and tr.], Annals of Ireland: three fragments, Dublin: Irish Archaeological and Celtic Society, 1860.
    Internet Archive: <link> Internet Archive: <link> Internet Archive: <link> Internet Archive: <link>

    web page identifiers

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    page ID: 1624
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