Texts

    verse beg. In mac ndíaid a athar a nArd Mauchai

    • verse
    • Early Irish poetry
    Initial words (verse)
    • In mac ndíaid a athar a nArd Mauchai
    “The son succeeding his father in Armagh”
    This is the first line of the poem itself.
    Initial words (prose)
    • Is mairg thairgeubhai a hairisne a luc tíri na n-Gáidhel
    A prose sentence introduces the text in the manuscripts, rendered as ‘Is mairg thairgeubhai a hairisne a luc tíri na n-Gáidhel’ (‘Sorrowful the news that will come to the land of the Gael’) in Meyer’s edition.n. 1 Craig Haggart, ‘Abbatial contention in Armagh in the eighth and ninth centuries: the Comarbada Pátraic as a source’, Studia Hibernica 32 (2002–2003).
    Ascribed to
    Becc mac DéBecc mac Dé (d. 550s) – legendary seer, best known from literary sources as an Irish prophet associated with Díarmait mac Cerbaill
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    Manuscripts
    Form
    verse (primary)
    prose (secondary)
    Textual relationships

    A gloss to Comarbada Pátraic regarding the succession of Dub Dá Léithe, abbot of Armagh, by his son (Connmach) refers to the prophecy by Becc mac Dé (mac Duib da Lethi is e sin in mac i ndiad a athair ut prophetauit Bec mac De - see Haggart, p. 48, below).

    Classification

    Early Irish poetry

    Subject tags

     Ard Macha

    Sources

    Notes

    Primary sources Text editions and/or modern translations – in whole or in part – along with publications containing additions and corrections, if known. Diplomatic editions, facsimiles and digital image reproductions of the manuscripts are not always listed here but may be found in entries for the relevant manuscripts. For historical purposes, early editions, transcriptions and translations are not excluded, even if their reliability does not meet modern standards.

    [ed.] Meyer, Kuno [ed.], “Mitteilungen aus irischen Handschriften: Beg mac Dé profetauit”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 9 (1913): 169–171.
    CELT – edition: <link> Internet Archive: <link>
    Translation wanted.
    No translation recorded at this stage.

    Secondary sources (select)

    Haggart, Craig, “Abbatial contention in Armagh in the eighth and ninth centuries: the Comarbada Pátraic as a source”, Studia Hibernica 32 (2002–2003): 35–58.
    Contributors
    Dennis Groenewegen
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