Project:Texts

From CODECS: Online Database and e-Resources for Celtic Studies

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Currently, there are 1596 entries for texts in the catalogue. Here is a list of the last 20 entries that have been added or modified. Fuller details can be seen by visiting the page.

[Ro-cúala ní tabair eochu ar dúana], verse beg. ‘Ro-cúala / ní tabair eochu ar dúana’
» Language(s): Late Old Irish » Stanzas: 1 st. » Categories: Early Irish poetry, Text entries » Type: early Irish lyrics
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[Int én bec], verse beg. ‘Int én bec’
» In English: “The little bird” » Language(s): Old Irish » Categories: Early Irish poetry, Text entries
, » Form: prose, verse » Categories: Irish texts, Irish texts on language and literature, Text entries
Short description:
Irish tract on the poetic metres that the seven grades of the noble bards (sóerbaird) had to master. Every type of metre is illustrated by a stanza from a bardic poem. Many of the poems cited in this way are no longer extant in their complete form.

, » Language(s): Middle Irish » Form: prose, verse » Categories: Irish texts, Irish texts on language and literature, Text entries » Type: tract on metrics
Short description:
A Middle Irish metrical tract intended to enumerate and illustrate various metrical types, both common and uncommon.

, » Author(s): Id:Gerald of Wales » Language(s): Latin language, Cambro-Latin, Anglo-Latin » Categories: Cambro-Latin texts, Anglo-Latin texts, Text entries
, » Author(s): Id:Gerald of Wales » Language(s): Latin language, Cambro-Latin, Anglo-Latin » Form: prose » Categories: Cambro-Latin texts, Anglo-Latin texts, Text entries
, » In English: “Recreation for an emperor” » Author(s): Id:Gervase of Tilbury » Language(s): Latin language » Form: prose » Categories: Anglo-Latin texts, Text entries
Short description:
Encyclopaedic work written by the English jurist and cleric Gervase of Tilbury. It was dedicated to Emperor Otto IV and intended for his instruction and entertainment, although it is unclear if he ever heard or read the work. The work is divided into three books or decisiones: book I covers the early history of the world, from Creation onwards; book II offers a historical geography of the world (mappa mundi) and its provinces, with excursions on the Holy Land and the six ages of the world. While anecdotal material, including legends about marvels (mirabilia), is found throughout the first two books, book III is entirely devoted to marvellous phenomena.

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[Mæielbriðus MacDurnani], verse beg. ‘Mæielbriðus MacDurnani’
» Language(s): Latin language » Form: verse » Categories: Anglo-Latin texts, Text entries
Short description:
Anglo-Latin metrical inscription in the Mac Durnan Gospels (f. 3v), written in square capitals. It says that the manuscript was written by or at the behest of Máel Brigte mac Tornáin and that Æthelstan, king of England (r. 924-939), donated it to Christ Church, Canterbury.

, » In English: “Book of revelations” » Author(s): Id:Peter of Cornwall » Language(s): Latin language » Categories: Anglo-Latin texts, Text entries
Short description:
A collection of stories about visions of the afterlife and supernatural events, many them culled from a variety of sources

, » Author(s): Id:Aldhelm » Language(s): Latin language, Anglo-Latin » Form: prose » Categories: Anglo-Latin texts, Text entries » Type: letter
Short description:
A letter from Aldhelm to an English student named Wihtfrith. Wihtfrith intends to study in Ireland, but Aldhelm advises him against it. The form in which the text survives is as a quotation in Book V of William of Malmesbury's Gesta pontificum Anglorum.

, » Author(s): Id:Aldhelm » Language(s): Latin language, Anglo-Latin » Form: prose » Categories: Anglo-Latin texts, Text entries » Type: letter
Short description:
A letter from Aldhelm to an Englishman named Heahfrith. It was written to dissuade him from studying in Ireland, preferring the new English learning represented by the teachings of Theodore and Hadrian to the state of learning in Ireland.

, » Author(s): Id:Alcuin » Language(s): Latin language » Form: prose » Categories: Anglo-Latin texts, Text entries
Short description:
Alcuin’s revised version of the vita of Richarius (Ricquier), an early 7th-century Frankish nobleman and founder of the monastery of Centula (Saint-Riquier, Picardy).

, » Author(s): Id:Aldhelm » Language(s): Latin language, Anglo-Latin » Form: prose » Categories: Anglo-Latin texts, Text entries » Type: letter
Short description:
Letter written by Aldhelm, then abbot of Malmesbury, to Gereint, king of Dumnonia, and to his sacerdotes.

, » Author(s): Id:Aldhelm » Language(s): Anglo-Latin, Latin language » Form: prose » Categories: Anglo-Latin texts, Text entries » Type: letter
Short description:
Letter from Aldhelm in reply to Cellán (Lat. Cellanus), abbot of Perrona, Neustria (modern Péronne, Picardy). The form in which the text survives is as a quotation in Book V of William of Malmesbury's Gesta pontificum Anglorum, along with Cellán's letter.

, » Author(s): Id:Benedict of Gloucester » Language(s): Latin language » Form: prose » Categories: Text entries, Anglo-Latin texts
Short description:
Latin life of St Dyfrig (Dubricius) written by the twelfth-century Benedictine monk Benedict of Gloucester. 

, » In English: “The journey through Wales” » Author(s): Id:Gerald of Wales » Language(s): Anglo-Latin, Cambro-Latin » Form: prose » Categories: Anglo-Latin texts, Cambro-Latin texts, Text entries
, » Author(s): Id:Gerald of Wales » Language(s): Latin language, Cambro-Latin, Anglo-Latin » Categories: Cambro-Latin texts, Anglo-Latin texts, Text entries
, » In English: “The description of Wales” » Author(s): Id:Gerald of Wales » Language(s): Anglo-Latin, Cambro-Latin » Form: prose » Categories: Anglo-Latin texts, Cambro-Latin texts, Text entries
, » Ascribed author(s): Id:Byrhtferth of Ramsey » Language(s): Latin language » Form: diagram, prose » Categories: Anglo-Latin texts, Text entries » Type: Subject:diagrams
Short description:
Elaborate diagram of the ‘harmony of the months and elements’, which once occupied a single page in a largely computistical manuscript compiled by Byrhtferth of Ramsey (c. 970–c. 1020). The original of this compilation is lost, but two independent ‘copies’ made in the early 12th century remain. The diagram aligns different aspects of time (solstice, equinox, months, seasons, ages of man), the zodiac and the four elements, and in this way, introduces a number of key concepts relevant to computus. In the Oxford manuscript, the diagram comes right at the end of a section (ff. 3r-7v) which contains a miscellaneous variety of short texts and visual designs related to computus, and directly precedes another section (ff. 8r-15v) containing tables and texts on computus.

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[Dinnshenchas of Port Láirge], verse beg. ‘Fil sund áige do churp ríg’ , part of or cited in: Dinnshenchas Érenn A, Dinnshenchas Érenn B, Dinnshenchas Érenn C
» In English: “There is here a limb from the body of a king” » Language(s): Middle Irish » Form: verse, prose » Categories: Early Irish poetry, Dinnshenchas Érenn, Text entries » Type: dinnshenchas
Short description:
Dinnshenchas of Port Láirge (Waterford)


...further results

The focal business that has stood out thus far is the creation of many basic entries for ‘texts’, a term which is here somewhat generously used to cover a wide variety of textual items: prose narratives, poems, compilations, anecdotes, treatises, homilies, glosses, charters, genealogical tracts, textual fragments, and so forth. The vast majority of these are texts transmitted in manuscript form, but on the odd occasion, texts in other textual media such as wax tablets and printed books are also taken into consideration. In addition, a catalogue entry may also describe a separate recension or individual parts of a larger unit if separate attention is warranted.
n. 1 To take one example: in addition to the main entry for the Táin bó Cúailnge and in addition to separate pages for the three main recensions of this momentous epic tale, the various episodes are given separate attention. A template placed at the bottom of the page allows readers to catch the sequence of episodes at a glimpse. Poems, including the roscada (non-syllabic accentual verse), will be given their own entries and the well-known scribal memoranda at the end of the Book of Leinster version can be found at this location.
Information about individual texts usually includes an overview of manuscripts in which they are transmitted and lists of publications such as editions, translations and secondary studies. These annotations are linked to relevant entries in the catalogue, if available, and retrieve preformatted reference details from those pages.
n. 2 What is by meant by the latter is, for instance, that the full citation is stored only once, on its own reference page (e.g. Carey, J., “The uses of tradition in Serglige Con Culainn”, in Ulidia (1994)), and can be called wherever a citation is required. In this way, editors are spared a lot of unnecessary double work and consistency of formatting does not have to rely solely on the constant vigilance of copyeditors.

Please be aware that categorisation is only rudimentary at present and what there is may not be consistent across the board. Once a more robust, fine-tuned classification scheme is in place, we can finally begin improving the user interface and offer better ways to combine search criteria.


Subprojects

More information is forthcoming

Subprojects for Irish studies

The Dinnshenchas Érenn project

An index to the compilation known as the Dinnshenchas Érenn.

The early Irish law project

An index to the compilations, texts and textual fragments relating to early Irish law.

Early Irish poetry project

See Project:Early Irish poetry

Other

Texts/compilation which embed many different textual items, such as: