Project:Texts

From CODECS: Online Database and e-Resources for Celtic Studies

This page will soon be revised.

[edit]

Categories


Authors

forthcoming

Recent

Currently, there are 1596 entries for texts in the catalogue. Here is a list of the last 20 entries that have been added or modified. Fuller details can be seen by visiting the page.

» Language(s): Early Modern Irish » Form: prose » Categories: Text entries, Irish religious texts » Type: Subject:religious narratives
, » In English: “The life of Senán mac Geirrcinn” » Language(s): Early Modern Irish » Form: prose » Categories: Irish hagiography, Text entries » Type: Subject:Irish hagiography
Short description:
Vernacular Irish Life of St Senán of Inis Cathaig (Scattery Island).

, » In English: “The Life of Colum Cille” » Language(s): Middle Irish » Categories: Irish hagiography, Text entries
,
[M'óenurán im aireclán], verse beg. ‘M'óenurán im aireclán’
» Language(s): Old Irish » Categories: Early Irish poetry, Text entries
,
[Día lim fri cach sním], verse beg. ‘Día lim fri cach sním’
» Language(s): Late Old Irish » Categories: Early Irish poetry, Text entries » Type: Early Irish lyrics
,
[A Maire mín maithingen], verse beg. ‘A Maire mín, maith-ingen’
» In English: “Gentle Mary, good maiden” » Ascribed author(s): Id:Colum Cille » Language(s): Middle Irish » Form: verse » Categories: Early Irish poetry, Text entries » Type: early Irish lyrics, Subject:Irish prayers and hymns
Short description:
Middle Irish litany (16 qq) attributed to Colum Cille

,
[Deus meus adiuva me], verse beg. ‘Deus meus adiuva me’
» In English: “My God help me” » Author(s): Id:Ua Brolcháin (Máel Ísu) » Language(s): Middle Irish » Categories: Early Irish poetry, Text entries » Type: early Irish lyrics
Short description:
Early Irish poem attributed to Máel Ísu Ua Brolcháin

, » Initial words (prose): ‘BAÍ goba amra i nUltaib’ » Language(s): Middle Irish » Form: prose » Categories: Medieval Irish literature about poets, Ulster Cycle, Text entries
, » In English: “The guesting of Athirne” » Language(s): Middle Irish » Form: prose, verse, prosimetrum » Categories: Medieval Irish literature about poets, Ulster Cycle, Text entries
Short description:
The short prose text includes eight poems ascribed to Athirne.

,
[In mac ndíaid a athar a nArd Mauchai], verse beg. ‘In mac ndíaid a athar a nArd Mauchai’
» In English: “The son succeeding his father in Armagh” » Initial words (prose): ‘Is mairg thairgeubhai a hairisne a luc tíri na n-Gáidhel’ » Ascribed author(s): Id:Becc mac Dé » Form: verse » Categories: Early Irish poetry, Text entries
, » Initial words (prose): ‘Maircc taircébai ind-aimsir a mbia saerbráth cin chaemgnímha (...)’ » Ascribed author(s): Id:Fursa » Language(s): Early Irish » Form: prose » Categories: Irish religious texts, Text entries
Short description:
Prophecy attributed to St Fursa (the Devout)

,
[Dúthracar, a maic Dé bí], verse beg. ‘Dúthracar, a maic Dé bí’
» In English: “The comad of Manchán of Liath” » Ascribed author(s): Id:Manchán of Lemanaghan » Categories: Early Irish poetry, Text entries » Type: early Irish lyrics
, » In English: “A triadic arrangement of the judgments/sayings of the Irish” » Language(s): Old Irish » Categories: Medieval Irish wisdom literature, Text entries
, » Categories: Ulster Cycle, Text entries
,
[Sanas Cormaic/Prull], part of or cited in: Sanas Cormaic, Independent
» Form: prose » Categories: Medieval Irish literature about poets, Sanas Cormaic, Text entries » Type: Subject:minor Irish prose tales
, » Language(s): Old Irish, Middle Irish » Form: prose » Categories: Irish religious texts, Text entries » Type: Subject:minor Irish prose tales
, » Initial words (prose): ‘Ba sanct n-amra inti Senan’ » Language(s): Middle Irish » Form: prose » Categories: Text entries, Medieval Irish literature, Irish religious texts » Type: Subject:minor Irish prose tales, Subject:prefaces and epilogues, Subject:Irish hagiography
Short description:
A Middle Irish preface and epilogue to the poem Amra Senáin ‘The eulogy of Senán’ mac Geirrcinn, abbot and saint of Inis Cathaig (Scattery Island, Co. Clare), in two parts: (1) a short miracle story which relates how Senán delivered an artisan named Nárach from a monster inhabiting the estuary of the Shannon in which the river island is located, and (2) a short passage, directly before and after the poem (except in NLI MS G 30), attributing the poem to Dallán Forgaill. The first part seemingly derives from a version of the story as it is told in the Commentary to Félire Óengusso (8 March). Both versions take their cue from a reading of two lines in the Félire (Senan Indse Cathaig / crochais écrait n-árach ‘Senán of Inis Cathaig / disabled the enemy with a binding’, for which see Breatnach’s text and translation). The tale of Senán’s encounter is expanded, if without mention of Nárach, in Betha Shenáin.

, » Initial words (prose): ‘Fechtas do M. is toidin co n-acca Mael Doborchon’ » Language(s): Early Irish » Form: prose » Categories: Irish hagiography, Text entries » Type: Subject:minor Irish prose tales
Short description:
Anecdote about Mo Ling

, » Initial words (prose): ‘Drochcomaithech ro baí i n-ocus dosom .i. Grác’ » Language(s): Old Irish » Form: prose » Categories: Irish hagiography, Text entries » Type: legends, Subject:minor Irish prose tales
Short description:
Anecdote about Mo Ling and a neighbouring couple, Grác and his wife Crón

, » Initial words (prose): ‘Caillech dorat a mac dósum do M'Ling. Findat a h-ainm’ » Language(s): Early Irish » Form: prose, verse » Categories: Irish hagiography, Text entries » Type: Subject:minor Irish prose tales
Short description:
Early Irish anecdote about Mo Ling and an old woman (caillech) named Findat who gave her son to him; also on the appearance of Christ as a leper (clam).


...further results

The focal business that has stood out thus far is the creation of many basic entries for ‘texts’, a term which is here somewhat generously used to cover a wide variety of textual items: prose narratives, poems, compilations, anecdotes, treatises, homilies, glosses, charters, genealogical tracts, textual fragments, and so forth. The vast majority of these are texts transmitted in manuscript form, but on the odd occasion, texts in other textual media such as wax tablets and printed books are also taken into consideration. In addition, a catalogue entry may also describe a separate recension or individual parts of a larger unit if separate attention is warranted.
n. 1 To take one example: in addition to the main entry for the Táin bó Cúailnge and in addition to separate pages for the three main recensions of this momentous epic tale, the various episodes are given separate attention. A template placed at the bottom of the page allows readers to catch the sequence of episodes at a glimpse. Poems, including the roscada (non-syllabic accentual verse), will be given their own entries and the well-known scribal memoranda at the end of the Book of Leinster version can be found at this location.
Information about individual texts usually includes an overview of manuscripts in which they are transmitted and lists of publications such as editions, translations and secondary studies. These annotations are linked to relevant entries in the catalogue, if available, and retrieve preformatted reference details from those pages.
n. 2 What is by meant by the latter is, for instance, that the full citation is stored only once, on its own reference page (e.g. Carey, J., “The uses of tradition in Serglige Con Culainn”, in Ulidia (1994)), and can be called wherever a citation is required. In this way, editors are spared a lot of unnecessary double work and consistency of formatting does not have to rely solely on the constant vigilance of copyeditors.

Please be aware that categorisation is only rudimentary at present and what there is may not be consistent across the board. Once a more robust, fine-tuned classification scheme is in place, we can finally begin improving the user interface and offer better ways to combine search criteria.


Subprojects

More information is forthcoming

Subprojects for Irish studies

The Dinnshenchas Érenn project

An index to the compilation known as the Dinnshenchas Érenn.

The early Irish law project

An index to the compilations, texts and textual fragments relating to early Irish law.

Early Irish poetry project

See Project:Early Irish poetry

Other

Texts/compilation which embed many different textual items, such as:


CODECS is published online by Stichting A. G. van Hamel voor Keltische Studies (A. G. van Hamel Foundation for Celtic Studies) under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-SA 3.0) licence. Designed, directed and maintained by Dennis Groenewegen.