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From CODECS: Online Database and e-Resources for Celtic Studies

There are currently 1596 catalogue entries on texts.

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  • Initial words (prose): Eó Rossa ⁊ Eó Mugna ⁊ Bili Dathi ⁊ Craeb Uisnig ⁊ Bili Tortan: coic crand
  • Middle Irish
  • prose; verse
  • Short description: Tract on the dinnshenchas of five special trees of Ireland: the yew of Ross (Eó Rossa), the Yew of Mag Mugna (Eó Mugna), the Tree of Belach Dathí (Bile Dathí or Cráeb Belaig Dathi), the Tree of Tortu (Bile Tortain) and the Tree or Ash of Uisnech (Cráeb or Unnius Uisnig).
  • In English: ‘The destruction of Da Derga's hostel’
  • prose
    • In English: ‘The destruction of Uí Dergae's hostel’
    • Old Irish
    • prose
      • Latin language
      • prose
      • Short description: First Latin Life of St Samson, bishop of Dol.
      • In English: ‘The violent death of Muirchertach mac Erca’
      • Late Middle Irish
        • Late Old Irish
        • 1 st.
          • In English: ‘The little bird’
          • Old Irish
            • prose; verse
            • Short description: Irish tract on the poetic metres that the seven grades of the noble bards (sóerbaird) had to master. Every type of metre is illustrated by a stanza from a bardic poem. Many of the poems cited in this way are no longer extant in their complete form.
            • Middle Irish
            • prose; verse
            • Short description: A Middle Irish metrical tract intended to enumerate and illustrate various metrical types, both common and uncommon.
            • Authored by:
              Thought to have been authored by...
              Gerald of Wales
            • Latin language; Cambro-Latin; Anglo-Latin
              • Authored by:
                Thought to have been authored by...
                Gerald of Wales
              • Latin language; Cambro-Latin; Anglo-Latin
              • prose
                • In English: ‘Recreation for an emperor’
                • Authored by:
                  Thought to have been authored by...
                  Gervase of Tilbury
                • Latin language
                • prose
                • Short description: Encyclopaedic work written by the English jurist and cleric Gervase of Tilbury. It was dedicated to Emperor Otto IV and intended for his instruction and entertainment, although it is unclear if he ever heard or read the work. The work is divided into three books or decisiones: book I covers the early history of the world, from Creation onwards; book II offers a historical geography of the world (mappa mundi) and its provinces, with excursions on the Holy Land and the six ages of the world. While anecdotal material, including legends about marvels (mirabilia), is found throughout the first two books, book III is entirely devoted to marvellous phenomena.
                • Latin language
                • verse
                • Short description: Anglo-Latin metrical inscription in the Mac Durnan Gospels (f. 3v), written in square capitals. It says that the manuscript was written by or at the behest of Máel Brigte mac Tornáin and that Æthelstan, king of England (r. 924-939), donated it to Christ Church, Canterbury.
                • In English: ‘Book of revelations’
                • Authored by:
                  Thought to have been authored by...
                  Peter of Cornwall
                • Latin language
                • Short description: A collection of stories about visions of the afterlife and supernatural events, many them culled from a variety of sources
                • Authored by:
                  Thought to have been authored by...
                  Aldhelm
                • Latin language; Anglo-Latin
                • prose
                • Short description: A letter from Aldhelm to an English student named Wihtfrith. Wihtfrith intends to study in Ireland, but Aldhelm advises him against it. The form in which the text survives is as a quotation in Book V of William of Malmesbury's Gesta pontificum Anglorum.
                • Authored by:
                  Thought to have been authored by...
                  Aldhelm
                • Latin language; Anglo-Latin
                • prose
                • Short description: A letter from Aldhelm to an Englishman named Heahfrith. It was written to dissuade him from studying in Ireland, preferring the new English learning represented by the teachings of Theodore and Hadrian to the state of learning in Ireland.
                • Authored by:
                  Thought to have been authored by...
                  Alcuin
                • Latin language
                • prose
                • Short description: Alcuin’s revised version of the vita of Richarius (Ricquier), an early 7th-century Frankish nobleman and founder of the monastery of Centula (Saint-Riquier, Picardy).
                • Authored by:
                  Thought to have been authored by...
                  Aldhelm
                • Latin language; Anglo-Latin
                • prose
                • Short description: Letter written by Aldhelm, then abbot of Malmesbury, to Gereint, king of Dumnonia, and to his sacerdotes.
                • Authored by:
                  Thought to have been authored by...
                  Aldhelm
                • Anglo-Latin; Latin language
                • prose
                • Short description: Letter from Aldhelm in reply to Cellán (Lat. Cellanus), abbot of Perrona, Neustria (modern Péronne, Picardy). The form in which the text survives is as a quotation in Book V of William of Malmesbury's Gesta pontificum Anglorum, along with Cellán's letter.
                • Authored by:
                  Thought to have been authored by...
                  Benedict of Gloucester
                • Latin language
                • prose
                • Short description: Latin life of St Dyfrig (Dubricius) written by the twelfth-century Benedictine monk Benedict of Gloucester. 
                • In English: ‘The journey through Wales’
                • Authored by:
                  Thought to have been authored by...
                  Gerald of Wales
                • Anglo-Latin; Cambro-Latin
                • prose
                  • Authored by:
                    Thought to have been authored by...
                    Gerald of Wales
                  • Latin language; Cambro-Latin; Anglo-Latin
                    • In English: ‘The description of Wales’
                    • Authored by:
                      Thought to have been authored by...
                      Gerald of Wales
                    • Anglo-Latin; Cambro-Latin
                    • prose
                      • Ascribed to: Byrhtferth of Ramsey
                      • Latin language
                      • diagram; prose
                      • Short description: Elaborate diagram of the ‘harmony of the months and elements’, which once occupied a single page in a largely computistical manuscript compiled by Byrhtferth of Ramsey (c. 970–c. 1020). The original of this compilation is lost, but two independent ‘copies’ made in the early 12th century remain. The diagram aligns different aspects of time (solstice, equinox, months, seasons, ages of man), the zodiac and the four elements, and in this way, introduces a number of key concepts relevant to computus. In the Oxford manuscript, the diagram comes right at the end of a section (ff. 3r-7v) which contains a miscellaneous variety of short texts and visual designs related to computus, and directly precedes another section (ff. 8r-15v) containing tables and texts on computus.
                      • [Dinnshenchas of Port Láirge]
                      • verse beg. Fil sund áige do churp ríg
                      • part of or cited in: Dinnshenchas Érenn A; Dinnshenchas Érenn B; Dinnshenchas Érenn C
                      • In English: ‘There is here a limb from the body of a king’
                      • Middle Irish
                      • verse; prose
                      • Short description: Dinnshenchas of Port Láirge (Waterford)
                      • Early Modern Irish
                      • prose
                        • In English: ‘The life of Senán mac Geirrcinn’
                        • Early Modern Irish
                        • prose
                        • Short description: Vernacular Irish Life of St Senán of Inis Cathaig (Scattery Island).
                        • In English: ‘The Life of Colum Cille’
                        • Middle Irish
                          • Old Irish
                            • Late Old Irish
                              • In English: ‘Gentle Mary, good maiden’
                              • Ascribed to: Colum Cille
                              • Middle Irish
                              • verse
                              • Short description: Middle Irish litany (16 qq) attributed to Colum Cille
                              • In English: ‘My God help me’
                              • Authored by:
                                Thought to have been authored by...
                                Ua Brolcháin (Máel Ísu)
                              • Middle Irish
                              • Short description: Early Irish poem attributed to Máel Ísu Ua Brolcháin
                              • Initial words (prose): BAÍ goba amra i nUltaib
                              • Middle Irish
                              • prose
                                • In English: ‘The guesting of Athirne’
                                • Middle Irish
                                • prose; verse; prosimetrum
                                • Short description: The short prose text includes eight poems ascribed to Athirne.
                                • In English: ‘The son succeeding his father in Armagh’
                                • Initial words (prose): Is mairg thairgeubhai a hairisne a luc tíri na n-Gáidhel
                                • Ascribed to: Becc mac Dé
                                • verse
                                  • Initial words (prose): Maircc taircébai ind-aimsir a mbia saerbráth cin chaemgnímha (...)
                                  • Ascribed to: Fursa
                                  • Early Irish
                                  • prose
                                  • Short description: Prophecy attributed to St Fursa (the Devout)
                                  • In English: ‘The comad of Manchán of Liath’
                                  • Ascribed to: Manchán of Lemanaghan
                                    • In English: ‘A triadic arrangement of the judgments/sayings of the Irish’
                                    • Old Irish
                                        • prose
                                          • Old Irish; Middle Irish
                                          • prose
                                            • Initial words (prose): Ba sanct n-amra inti Senan
                                            • Middle Irish
                                            • prose
                                            • Short description: A Middle Irish preface and epilogue to the poem Amra Senáin ‘The eulogy of Senán’ mac Geirrcinn, abbot and saint of Inis Cathaig (Scattery Island, Co. Clare), in two parts: (1) a short miracle story which relates how Senán delivered an artisan named Nárach from a monster inhabiting the estuary of the Shannon in which the river island is located, and (2) a short passage, directly before and after the poem (except in NLI MS G 30), attributing the poem to Dallán Forgaill. The first part seemingly derives from a version of the story as it is told in the Commentary to Félire Óengusso (8 March). Both versions take their cue from a reading of two lines in the Félire (Senan Indse Cathaig / crochais écrait n-árach ‘Senán of Inis Cathaig / disabled the enemy with a binding’, for which see Breatnach’s text and translation). The tale of Senán’s encounter is expanded, if without mention of Nárach, in Betha Shenáin.
                                            • Initial words (prose): Fechtas do M. is toidin co n-acca Mael Doborchon
                                            • Early Irish
                                            • prose
                                            • Short description: Anecdote about Mo Ling
                                            • Initial words (prose): Drochcomaithech ro baí i n-ocus dosom .i. Grác
                                            • Old Irish
                                            • prose
                                            • Short description: Anecdote about Mo Ling and a neighbouring couple, Grác and his wife Crón
                                            • Initial words (prose): Caillech dorat a mac dósum do M'Ling. Findat a h-ainm
                                            • Early Irish
                                            • prose; verse
                                            • Short description: Early Irish anecdote about Mo Ling and an old woman (caillech) named Findat who gave her son to him; also on the appearance of Christ as a leper (clam).
                                            • In English: ‘The wooing of Bais the druidess’
                                            • Irish language
                                            • Short description:

                                              A very short text written in an obscure form of medieval Irish and apparently relating to a meeting between Fachtna Fáthach, known from other sources as a legendary king of Ulster, and a certain Bais, sorceress (bandruad) and daughter of Crunnmáel.

                                            • In English: ‘The adventures of Rícenn ingen Chrimthainn and Caírech Dergáin’
                                            • Initial words (prose): Crimthann mac Lughdhach diatā Crimthann la Hū Maine is ē cētfher di Chonnachtaib romarb mnāi iar creidem hé.
                                            • Middle Irish
                                            • prose
                                            • Short description: Short narrative about two pious women, Rícenn, daughter of the king of Uí Maine, and her tutoress Caírech Dergáin, nun at Clúain Bairenn.
                                            • Middle Irish
                                            • Short description: A Middle Irish short story about a dialogue between Brénainn of Clonfert with one of his successors, Moínenn, bishop of Clonfert, on the subject of death and the afterlife.
                                            • Old Irish
                                            • prose
                                            • Short description: Two short prose stories about Finn, cited in the commentary to the Senchas Már as a gloss on the term imbas forosnai. The first, about Finn's encounter with the supernatural thief Cúldub, tells how Finn acquired the gift of imbas, while the second story, about Finn and the gilla Derg Corra, tells how Finn put this gift to use.
                                            • Middle Irish
                                            • prose


                                              FURTHER RESULTS…

                                              • Latin language
                                              • prose
                                              • Short description: Anonymous grammatical treatise which shows affinities with other, Hiberno-Latin or insular grammars.
                                              • Initial words (prose): Quae sunt quae omnem ueritatem scripturae commendant
                                              • Latin language
                                              • prose
                                              • Short description:

                                                Early medieval, 7th or 8th-century grammatical text in the form of a collection of select glosses on Donatus’s Ars minor and to a lesser extent, the Ars maior. It may have been written by an Irishman at home or on the continent.

                                              • Latin language
                                              • prose
                                              • Short description:

                                                The hypothetical Irish commentary on Donatus’ Ars maior which according to Louis Holtz, underlies three extant Hiberno-Latin commentaries produced on the continent in the ninth century: those by Sedulius Scottus and Muiredach and the anonymous Ars Laureshamensis. The suggested scenario is that the work originated at home in Ireland and was brought to the continent by Irish peregrini.

                                              • Authored by:
                                                Thought to have been authored by...
                                                Asperius
                                              • Ascribed to: Asporius
                                              • Latin language
                                              • prose
                                              • Short description:

                                                A 6th-century or early 7th-century commentary on Donatus, Ars minor, ascribed to one Asperus/Asperius or Asporius, who may have been an Irishman. It represents a Christianised reworking of the material.

                                              • Initial words (prose): In dei nomine pauca incipiunt de philosophia et de partibus eius
                                              • Ascribed to: Clemens Scottus
                                              • Latin language
                                              • prose
                                              • Short description:

                                                Latin grammar (ars grammatica) once attributed to the Irish peregrinus and teacher Clemens Scottus but now regarded as an anonymous work.

                                              • In English: ‘I found in the Psalter of Cashel’
                                              • Ascribed to: Gilla Cóemáin Mac Líacc ... Muirchertach
                                              • Early Modern Irish
                                              • verse
                                                • Authored by:
                                                  Thought to have been authored by...
                                                  Benedict of Gloucester
                                                • Latin language
                                                • prose
                                                • Short description: Latin life of St Dyfrig (Dubricius) written by the twelfth-century Benedictine monk Benedict of Gloucester. 
                                                • prose
                                                • Short description:

                                                  The second recension of the Latin Life of St Teilo, which is attested in the Book of Landaff.

                                                • prose
                                                • Short description:

                                                  The earliest recension of the Latin Life of St Teilo, which is attested in the legendary of Vespasian A.xiv.

                                                • Late Middle Irish
                                                • verse
                                                • 12 st.
                                                • Short description:

                                                  Irish poem representing a dialogue between St Moling and Suibne.

                                                • In English: ‘Fear of foreigners came to Mo Ling’
                                                • Ascribed to: Mo Ling
                                                • Irish language
                                                • verse
                                                • 21 st.
                                                • Short description:

                                                  Irish poem. In Dobb’s summary of the text, the poem “tells a story about Mulling and his kinsman Muiccin of Maighin. Muiccin is in the book of saints in LL, Lecan, BB, and elsewhere. The gist of the poem is as follows. There was a scare of foreign invasion. (Such actually occurred in 638, according to the Four Masters) Mulling asked Muiccin to hide two-thirds of his books. He hid them in a cave known as Derc Ferna, where they were destroyed by wet. These books were probably the work of years and the handiwork of Mulling himself. It must have been a great blow. No one would blame him if he had cursed Muiccin, but when this latter implored pardon, Mulling, with real saintliness, forgave him.”

                                                • Early Modern Irish
                                                • prose
                                                  • Latin language; Irish language
                                                  • prose
                                                  • Short description: The hypothesized compilation of Irish annals whose text is no longer extant in its original form but whose contents have been partially reconstructed, to varying extents of probability, from the so-called Clonmacnoise group of annals and the Annals of Ulster.
                                                  • Irish language
                                                  • prose
                                                  • Short description: The lost, Irish original that underlies the early modern English translation known as Mageoghegan’s book or Annals of Clonmacnoise. To judge from the latter, the annals were updated into the beginning of the 15th century.
                                                  • In English: ‘History/lore of the descendants of Ír’
                                                  • Short description: One of the major compilations of Irish genealogical material and king-lists, describing the Ulaid and (allegedly) related population groups whose descent is traced from Ír, a third son of Míl. The oldest seven manuscript versions of the collection represent at least three distinct recensions. In John V. Kelleher's view, their “chief theme is that the true Ulaid (fír-Ulaid) are the Dál nAraide and Uí Echach Coba, and this particularly set forth in the tracts that begin the section, which recount the senchus of Síl Ír, the Ulaid kings of Ireland, the kings of Emain Macha, etc. Also of Síl Ír are the Ciarraige, Corco mdruad, Conmaicne, and Ulaid. In the corpus the historical Ulaid are closely related to the Érainn and both are attached to the ancestral line of Dál Cuinn at Óengus Turbech Temrach, 19 generations before Conn Cétchathach. However, not much attention is paid to Dál Fiatach in Rawl. 502.”
                                                  • Authored by:
                                                    Thought to have been authored by...
                                                    Malsachanus
                                                  • Latin language
                                                  • Short description: Latin grammatical treatise on the verb and the participle. In the Naples manuscript version of the text, there is also a section on nouns and pronoun but its relationship to the present text is unclear.
                                                  • Latin language
                                                  • prose
                                                  • Short description: Latin commentary on the Catholic Epistles by an anonymous but probably Irish author.
                                                  • Short description: A single verse quatrain about the the transience of a scribe's life.
                                                    • Authored by:
                                                      Thought to have been authored by...
                                                      Laidcenn mac Baíth Bannaig
                                                    • Ascribed to: Laidcenn mac Baíth Bannaig
                                                    • Latin language
                                                    • prose
                                                    • Short description: An epitome of Gregory the Great's lengthy commentary on the Book of Job, Moralia in Iob. This abbreviated version is attributed to the 7th-century Irish theologian Laidcenn mac Baíth Bannaig, abbot of Clúain Fertae Mo Lua (Clonfertmulloe), and may have been brought to mainland Europe by Irish peregrini. The work is now extant in a dozen continental manuscripts.
                                                    • Latin language
                                                    • verse
                                                    • Short description: Hiberno-Latin synchronistic poem on the six ages of the world, covering both biblical and classical history. Each line consists of 15 syllables. A detail for which this poem attracted attention is the obit of Domnall rex Scottorum, presumably Domnall mac Áeda (although Domnall Brecc has been suggested as another candidate), in the year 642.
                                                    • In English: ‘The life of Senán’
                                                    • Latin language
                                                    • prose
                                                    • Short description: A Latin breviary in nine lessons relating the Life of St Senán of Inis Cathaig. It was written for use in Brittany and derives, according to Pádraig Ó Riain, from the metrical version of the saint's Life.
                                                    • In English: ‘The life of Senán’
                                                    • Latin language
                                                    • prose
                                                    • Short description: Latin prose Life of St Senán of Inis Cathaig (BHL 7574) which is found in copies of the Magnum Legendarium Austriacum [1 July].
                                                    • Initial words (prose): Ba sanct n-amra inti Senan
                                                    • Middle Irish
                                                    • prose
                                                    • Short description: A Middle Irish preface and epilogue to the poem Amra Senáin ‘The eulogy of Senán’ mac Geirrcinn, abbot and saint of Inis Cathaig (Scattery Island, Co. Clare), in two parts: (1) a short miracle story which relates how Senán delivered an artisan named Nárach from a monster inhabiting the estuary of the Shannon in which the river island is located, and (2) a short passage, directly before and after the poem (except in NLI MS G 30), attributing the poem to Dallán Forgaill. The first part seemingly derives from a version of the story as it is told in the Commentary to Félire Óengusso (8 March). Both versions take their cue from a reading of two lines in the Félire (Senan Indse Cathaig / crochais écrait n-árach ‘Senán of Inis Cathaig / disabled the enemy with a binding’, for which see Breatnach’s text and translation). The tale of Senán’s encounter is expanded, if without mention of Nárach, in Betha Shenáin.
                                                    • In English: ‘The life of Senán mac Geirrcinn’
                                                    • Early Modern Irish
                                                    • prose
                                                    • Short description: Vernacular Irish Life of St Senán of Inis Cathaig (Scattery Island).
                                                    • Short description: A collection of dinnshenchas articles, much of it in prose, that is uniquely attested in RIA MS D ii 2 (ff. 81v-90r), where it occurs as a supplement to a copy of Dinnshenchas Érenn (recension C). Many items are unique to this manuscript, while some of the material appears to have been derived from other texts, such as Tochmarc Emire, Lebor gabála Érenn and Cath Maige Mucrama, and even other recensions of Dinnshenchas Érenn.
                                                    • Irish language
                                                    • verse
                                                    • Short description: Irish poem (7qq) apparently concerning Emain Macha and Cimbáeth. It is found in NLI MS G 7, where it is prefaced with a short prose introduction (beg. Toforaint in Márrighan laithriuch nduine lie hAulta hi Machi) referring to the the dinnshenchas for Emain Macha. Editions, translations and discussions in secondary literature are unknown at this stage.
                                                    • Ascribed to: Úa Duinn (Gilla na Náem)
                                                    • Late Middle Irish
                                                    • verse
                                                    • Short description: Long poem attributed in various manuscript copies to Gilla na Náem Úa Duinn.
                                                    • Ascribed to: Úa Duinn (Gilla na Náem)
                                                    • Late Middle Irish
                                                    • verse
                                                    • 121 st.
                                                    • Short description: A long poem (121 qq) giving a précis of the Dinnshenchas Érenn and included at the end of the version of that collection in the Book of Uí Maine. The last stanza attributes the poem to Gilla na Náem Úa Duinn and gives the year 1166.
                                                    • Ascribed to: Flann Mainistrech
                                                    • Middle Irish
                                                    • verse
                                                    • Short description: Medieval Irish poem attributed to Flann Mainistrech on the destruction of Troy. Mac Eoin believed it to have been based on a prose text concerning the Trojan war but not a text of Togail Troí as we know it today.
                                                    • Ascribed to: Úa Sesnáin (Colmán)
                                                    • Late Middle Irish
                                                    • Short description: Irish poem attributed to Colmán Úa Sesnáin on the prehistoric kings who ruled in Emain Macha, from Conchobar mac Nessa onwards.
                                                    • Late Middle Irish
                                                    • verse
                                                    • Short description: Anonymous Irish poem on the Christian kings of Ulster, thought by F. J. Fyrne to have been written in the reign of Eochaidh Mac Duinnshléibhe (1158-1166).
                                                    • Initial words (prose): In nomine Dei summi
                                                    • Old Irish
                                                    • prose
                                                    • Short description: Short prose homily in Old Irish and Latin, which has been dated as early as the 7th or the first half of the 8th century and on that account, has some claim to being the earliest specimen of Old Irish in continuous prose. The text has been frequently cited for its linguistic features and for its account of three forms of martyrdom categorised according to colour: white (bán), blue/green (glas) and red (derc).
                                                    • Initial words (prose): Atlochomar buidi do Dia uile-cumachtach
                                                    • Old Irish
                                                    • prose
                                                    • Short description: Old Irish prose homily (beg. Atlochomar buidi do Dia uile-cumachtach)
                                                    • Initial words (prose): Tri hollamain Chondacht .i. mac Liacc 7 mac Coisi 7 Fland mac Lonain .i. mac De 7 mac duine 7 mac deamain
                                                    • Irish language
                                                    • prose
                                                    • Short description: Short Irish prose tale about three poets of Connacht, Mac Liac, Mac Coise and Flann mac Lonáin. The text occurs in the Yellow Book of Lecan by way of a preface to the verse Dinnshenchas of Slíab nEchtga II attr. to Flann and follows another prose introduction about and poem attributed to Flann (Bó bithblicht meic Lonán).
                                                    • Initial words (prose): Laithe n-aen dia rabadar treis gnía léigind
                                                    • Irish language
                                                    • prose
                                                    • Short description: Short Irish prose tale, which has been edited by Meyer as an example of bérla na filed.
                                                    • Early Middle Irish; Late Old Irish
                                                    • verse
                                                    • Short description: Religious poem (8 qq)
                                                    • Old Irish
                                                      • Authored by:
                                                        Thought to have been authored by...
                                                        Dungal of Saint-Denis
                                                      • Ascribed to: Baldo of Salzburg
                                                      • Latin language
                                                      • verse
                                                      • Short description: Carolingian Latin poem written by Dungal (l. 3) and addressed to a certain Baldo magister.
                                                      • Authored by:
                                                        Thought to have been authored by...
                                                        Hibernicus Exul
                                                      • Ascribed to: Hibernicus Exul
                                                      • Latin language
                                                      • verse
                                                      • Short description: Latin poem addressed to Charlemagne and reflecting on his conflict with Tassilo III, duke of Bavary, whom he deposed in 788. The poem is preserved, in fragmentary form (103 hexametrical lines), in a single manuscript (Vatican, BAV, MS Reg. lat. 2078) and was written by an anonymous Irishman known from the heading as Hibernicus Exul.
                                                      • Latin language
                                                      • prose
                                                      • Short description: Latin Life of St Brynach (Lat. Bernachius). BHL 1186.
                                                      • In English: ‘The history of Gruffudd ap Cynan’
                                                      • Middle Welsh
                                                      • prose
                                                      • Short description: Middle Welsh translation of an earlier Latin biography of the life and career of Gruffudd ap Cynan, king of Gwynedd (r. 1081-1137).
                                                      • Early Modern Irish
                                                      • Short description: Irish Life of St Catherine of Alexandria
                                                      • Authored by:
                                                        Thought to have been authored by...
                                                        Ó Neachtain (Tadhg)
                                                      • Modern Irish
                                                      • prose
                                                      • Short description: Glosses by Tadhg Tiorthach Ó Neachtain to Trecheng breth Féne (Triads of Ireland) in Dublin, Trinity College, MS 1289 (c. 1745).
                                                      • Short description: A brief set of Irish annals, running from the reign of Laegaire to AD 1134 and thought to be of Armagh provenance.
                                                      • Initial words (prose): Is hé titul fil i n-dreich ind libuir se taitni do menmanaib inna légnide
                                                      • Old Irish
                                                      • prose
                                                        • Latin language; Old Irish
                                                        • Short description: Latin and some Irish glosses on computus in Vat. lat. 5755.
                                                        • In English: ‘The prose ‘Lore of women’’
                                                        • Middle Irish
                                                        • prose
                                                        • Short description: Prose version of the Banshenchas
                                                        • In English: ‘The metrical ‘Lore of women’’
                                                        • Authored by:
                                                          Thought to have been authored by...
                                                          Úa Caiside (Gilla Mo Dutu)
                                                        • Ascribed to: Úa Caiside (Gilla Mo Dutu)
                                                        • Middle Irish
                                                        • Short description: Metrical version of the Banshenchas, composed by Gilla Mo Dutu Úa Caiside (1147)
                                                        • Middle Welsh
                                                        • verse
                                                        • Short description: A long Middle Welsh verse litany enumerating the apostles, martyrs and saints of the world.


                                                        FURTHER RESULTS…