Sanas Cormaic/Rincne

From CODECS: Online Database and e-Resources for Celtic Studies
< Sanas CormaicSanas Cormaic/Rincne

    verse beg. Rin(g)cne quasi quinque

    • Middle Irish
    • prose
    • Sanas Cormaic, Finn Cycle, Medieval Irish literature about poets
    Entry for 'rincne' in Sanas Cormaic, with an anecdote about Ferchess, Mac Con and Finn úa Báiscni.
    Initial words (verse)
    • Rin(g)cne quasi quinque
    Context(s)
    The (textual) context(s) to which the present text belongs or in which it is cited in part or in whole.
    Summary
    (1) The word ‘rincne’ (quasi quinque) was uttered by Ferchess when Finn counted every five in turn in the host of Lugaid Mac Con in order to find Ferchess.

    (2) Ferchess passed by Finn, killed Mac Con with a cast of his spear and said: ‘Rincne (quasi) cairincne ris ríg’ (John O’Donovan tentatively translates this as “a little pentad is a king’s reproach”).

    (3) The same phrase used to be uttered by Finn when he counted every five in turn.
    Language
    • Middle Irish
    • (?)
    Date
    Assigned by Meyer to the 9th century.
    n. 1 Kuno Meyer, Fianaigecht (1910).
    Form
    prose (primary)
    Textual relationships
    Similar versions of this episode are told in Scéla Moshauluim ⁊ Maic Con ⁊ Luigdech and by Geoffrey Keating in his Foras feasa ar Éirinn, where rincne is the name of the spear. In the story of Mac Con's death in Cath Maige Mucrama and Aided Meic Con, Finn is not involved, although in the latter his fían is said to have avenged Mac Con's death.

    Classification

    Sanas Cormaic Finn Cycle Medieval Irish literature about poets

    Subject tags

     Finn mac Cumaill  Lugaid Mac Con  Ferchess mac Commáin
    • Sources

    Notes

    Kuno Meyer, Fianaigecht (1910).

    Primary sources
    Text editions and/or modern translations – in whole or in part – along with publications containing additions and corrections, if known. Diplomatic editions, facsimiles and digital image reproductions of the manuscripts are not always listed here but may be found in the entry for the relevant manuscript.

    [ed.] Meyer, Kuno, Fianaigecht: being a collection of hitherto inedited Irish poems and tales relating to Finn and his Fiana, Todd Lecture Series 16, London: Hodges, Figgis, 1910.
    National Library of Scotland – PDF: <link> Internet Archive: <link> Internet Archive: <link>
    xx–xxi.
    [ed.] Stokes, Whitley [ed.], Three Irish glossaries: Cormac’s Glossary, O’Davoren’s Glossary and a glossary to the Calendar of Oengus the Culdee, London: Williams and Norgate, 1862.
    TLH – ‘Cormac’s Glossary’ (pp. 1-44): <link> Internet Archive: <link>, <link>
    38–39.
    [ed.] [tr.] Stokes, Whitley [ed.], and John O'Donovan [tr.], Sanas Chormaic: Cormac’s Glossary, Irish Archaeological and Celtic Society, Calcutta: O.T. Cutter, 1868.
    Internet Archive: <link> HathiTrust: <link>, <link> Google Books: <link>
    142–143.

    Secondary sources

    Meyer, Kuno [ed.], “Sanas Cormaic. An Old-Irish glossary compiled by Cormac úa Cuilennáin, king-bishop of Cashel in the tenth century”, in: Bergin, Osborn, R. I. Best, Kuno Meyer, and J. G. O'Keeffe (eds.), Anecdota from Irish manuscripts, vol. 4, Halle and Dublin, 1912. 1–128 (text), i–xix (introduction).
    Internet Archive – vols 1-5: <link> Internet Archive – vols 3-5: <link>
    97

    Queried results

    if available
    Arbuthnot, Sharon J., “Finn, Ferchess and the rincne: versions compared”, in: Arbuthnot, Sharon J., and Geraldine Parsons (eds.), The Gaelic Finn tradition, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2012. 62–80.
    Meyer, Kuno [ed.], “Sanas Cormaic. An Old-Irish glossary compiled by Cormac úa Cuilennáin, king-bishop of Cashel in the tenth century”, in: Bergin, Osborn, R. I. Best, Kuno Meyer, and J. G. O'Keeffe (eds.), Anecdota from Irish manuscripts, vol. 4, Halle and Dublin, 1912. 1–128 (text), i–xix (introduction).
    Internet Archive – vols 1-5: <link> Internet Archive – vols 3-5: <link>
    Meyer, Kuno, “Introduction”, in: Meyer, Kuno, Fianaigecht: being a collection of hitherto inedited Irish poems and tales relating to Finn and his Fiana, Todd Lecture Series 16, London: Hodges, Figgis, 1910. v–xxxi.
    “Ninth century (v-xi)”
    v. Tucait fagbála in fessa do Finn ⁊ marbad Cuil Duib; vi. Bruiden Atha Í; vii. Finn and the jester Lomnae; viii. Entry for ‘rincne’ in Sanas Cormaic; ix. ‘Áth Liac Find, cid dia tá?’ (first recension); x. Poem ascribed to Flannacán mac Cellaig, beginning ‘Innid scél scaílter n-airich’; xi. Scél asa mberar co mbad hé Find mac Cumaill Mongán ocus aní dia fíl aided Fothaid Airgdig
    Meyer, Kuno, Fianaigecht: being a collection of hitherto inedited Irish poems and tales relating to Finn and his Fiana, Todd Lecture Series 16, London: Hodges, Figgis, 1910.
    National Library of Scotland – PDF: <link> Internet Archive: <link> Internet Archive: <link>
    Stokes, Whitley [ed.], and John O'Donovan [tr.], Sanas Chormaic: Cormac’s Glossary, Irish Archaeological and Celtic Society, Calcutta: O.T. Cutter, 1868.
    Internet Archive: <link> HathiTrust: <link>, <link> Google Books: <link>
    Stokes, Whitley [ed.], Three Irish glossaries: Cormac’s Glossary, O’Davoren’s Glossary and a glossary to the Calendar of Oengus the Culdee, London: Williams and Norgate, 1862.
    TLH – ‘Cormac’s Glossary’ (pp. 1-44): <link> Internet Archive: <link>, <link>

    web page identifiers

    page name: Sanas Cormaic/Rincne
    page url: //www.vanhamel.nl/codecs/Sanas_Cormaic/Rincne
    page ID: 4093
    page ID tracker: //www.vanhamel.nl/codecs/Show:ID?id=4093

    Contributors
    Dennis Groenewegen
    blog comments powered by Disqus
    CODECS is published online by Stichting A. G. van Hamel voor Keltische Studies (A. G. van Hamel Foundation for Celtic Studies) under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-SA 3.0) licence. Designed, directed and maintained by Dennis Groenewegen.