Texts

Ship seen in the air at Clonmacnoise (Edinburgh version)

  • Early Modern Irish
  • prose
  • Irish religious texts
Narrative anecdote in prose based on one of the wonders in De ingantaib Érenn.
Initial words (prose)
  • Lá n-áen robátar muintear Clúana a n-oireachtus for urrlár na cille
Manuscripts
Language
  • Early Modern Irish
Date
Jackson tentatively dates the text to the 14th or 15th century.
Form
prose (primary)
Textual relationships

Classification

Irish religious texts

Subjects

 Aerial ships
Clúain Moccu Nóis
Clúain Moccu Nóis ... Clonmacnoise
County Offaly
See more

Sources

Primary sources Text editions and/or modern translations – in whole or in part – along with publications containing additions and corrections, if known. Diplomatic editions, facsimiles and digital image reproductions of the manuscripts are not always listed here but may be found in entries for the relevant manuscripts. For historical purposes, early editions, transcriptions and translations are not excluded, even if their reliability does not meet modern standards.

[ed.] Meyer, Kuno [ed.], “Stories from the Edinburgh MS. XXVI (Kilbride Collection No 22)”, in: Bergin, Osborn, R. I. Best, Kuno Meyer, and J. G. O'Keeffe (eds.), Anecdota from Irish manuscripts, vol. 3, Halle and Dublin, 1910. 7–10.
Celtic Digital Initiative: <link>
8–9
[tr.] Jackson, Kenneth Hurlstone [tr.], A Celtic miscellany: translations from the Celtic literatures, Revised ed. (1951), Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1971.
165
[tr.] Carey, John, “Aerial ships and underwater monasteries: the evolution of a monastic marvel”, Proceedings of the Harvard Celtic Colloquium 12 (1992): 16–28.
18

Secondary sources (select)

Carey, John, “Aerial ships and underwater monasteries: the evolution of a monastic marvel”, Proceedings of the Harvard Celtic Colloquium 12 (1992): 16–28.
Contributors
Dennis Groenewegen