Bibliography

Paul
Russell

65 publications between 1985 and 2017 indexed
Sort by:

Works authored

Russell, Paul, Reading Ovid in medieval Wales, Text and Context, Ohio: Ohio State University, 2017.
Russell, Paul [ed. and trans.], Welsh law in medieval Anglesey: British Library, Harleian MS 1796 (Latin C), Texts and Studies in Medieval Welsh Law 2, Cambridge, 2011.
– Edition: <link>
Russell, Paul, ‘Read it in a glossary’: glossaries and learned discourse in medieval Ireland, Kathleen Hughes Memorial Lecture 6, Cambridge: ASNC, 2008.
Russell, Paul [ed. and tr.], Vita Griffini filii Conani: the medieval Latin life of Gruffudd ap Cynan, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2005.
Russell, Paul [ed.], Yr hen iaith: studies in early Welsh, Celtic Studies Publications 7, Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 2003.

Works edited

Hayden, Deborah, and Paul Russell (eds), Grammatica, gramadach and gramadeg: vernacular grammar and grammarians in medieval Ireland and Wales, Studies in the History of the Language Sciences 125, Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 2016.
abstract:
Grammatica, gramadach, and gramadeg: vernacular grammar and grammarians in medieval Ireland and Wales is concerned with the history of linguistic ideas and literary theory in the vernacular languages of medieval Ireland and Wales. While much good work, especially by Vivian Law, has been done on the Latin materials, this volume is the first to engage with the vernacular texts. It consists of ten essays that explore a range of interconnected topics relating to these themes. Yet while the contributors offer a close analysis of the development of linguistic thought in these literary traditions, they likewise seek to situate their discussions within the wider context of European grammatical learning during this period, considering both the widespread influence of texts from classical linguistic tradition and also the significance of sources from other contemporary learned disciplines for our understanding of the history of linguistics in the medieval world.
Henley, Georgia [ed.], Paul Russell [ed.], and Joseph F. Eska [assist ed.], Rhetoric and reality in medieval Celtic literature: studies in honor of Daniel F. Melia, CSANA Yearbook 11-12, Hamilton, NY: Colgate University Press, 2014.
Boyle, Elizabeth, and Paul Russell (eds.), The tripartite life of Whitley Stokes (1830-1909), Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2011.
Edmonds, Fiona, and Paul Russell (eds.), Tome: studies in medieval Celtic history and law in honour of Thomas Charles-Edwards, Studies in Celtic History 31, Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 2011.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., and Paul Russell (eds.), Tair colofn cyfraith: The three columns of law in medieval Wales: homicide, theft and fire, Cymdeithas Hanes Cyfraith Cymru 5, Bangor: The Welsh Legal History Society, 2007.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., Morfydd E. Owen, and Paul Russell (eds.), The Welsh king and his court, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2000.

Contributions to journals

Russell, Paul, “Aduỽyn gaer yssyd: an early Welsh poem revisited”, Celtica 29 (2017): 6–37.
Russell, Paul, “Canyt oes aruer: Gwilym Wasta and the laws of court in Welsh law”, North American Journal of Celtic Studies 1:2 (November, 2017): 173–188.
abstract:
It is conventional to divide the manuscript tradition of the Blegywryd redaction of the Welsh laws into two groups depending on whether they contain the Laws of Court and where the triads are positioned. It has long been recognised that Gwilym Wasta (working ca. 1300) was the scribe of the three manuscripts which do not contain the Laws of Court and that in three of the manuscripts he replaced them with a colophon in which he seems to claim that he has omitted them because they were no longer in use. This paper argues that matters might be rather more complicated and that the omission of the Laws of Court may have been more by accident than design.
Russell, Paul, “From plates and rods to royal drink-stands in Branwen and medieval Welsh law”, North American Journal of Celtic Studies 1:1 (May, 2017): 1–26.
abstract:
This paper takes as its starting point the well-known passage in Branwen about the compensation for Matholwch and its relationship to the Iorwerth redaction of medieval Welsh law. It argues, first, that the text of Branwen need not be emended by reference to the Iorwerth redaction. It then traces the textual development of the legal passage from a silver rod and gold plate in Iorwerth to an elaborate royal drink-stand in the other redactions. It follows Robin Chapman Stacey in suggesting that the Iorwerth redaction has maintained a simple version of this text to ensure the text is seen as unexceptional from a broader European perspective of kingship. Finally, it returns to a particular aspect of these descriptions, the Welsh and Latin terms used for fingers which present a confused and muddled picture.
Russell, Paul, “Priuilegium sancti Teliaui and Breint Teilo”, Studia Celtica 50 (2016): 41–68.
Russell, Paul, “Revisiting the ‘Welsh dictator’ of the Old English Orosius”, Quaestio Insularis 12 (2011, 2012): 31–62.
Russell, Paul, “The englyn to St Padarn revisited”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 63 (Summer, 2012): 1–14.
Russell, Paul, “Latin and British in Roman and Post-Roman Britain: methodology and morphology”, Transactions of the Philological Society 109:2 (July, 2011): 138–157.
Laker, Stephen, and Paul Russell, “Languages of early Britain: introduction”, Transactions of the Philological Society 109:2 (July, 2011): 109–112.
Russell, Paul, “Uocridem: a new British word from Vindolanda”, Studia Celtica 45 (2011): 192–197.
Russell, Paul, “Scribal (in)consistency in thirteenth-century South Wales: the orthography of the Black Book of Carmarthen”, Studia Celtica 43 (2009): 135–174.
Russell, Paul, “Welsh *Cynnwgl and related matters”, Studia Celtica 39 (2005): 181–188.
Russell, Paul, “Texts in contexts: recent work on the medieval Welsh prose tales”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 45 (Summer, 2003): 59–72.
Russell, Paul, “Graece … Latine: Graeco-Latin glossaries in early medieval Ireland”, Peritia 14 (2000): 406–420.
abstract:
Early Irish glossaries contain a number of entries in which Greek etymologies are offered. The format resembles that of continental Graeco-Latin glossaries and it is proposed that material similar to that which is attested in Laon ms 444 was a source for the vernacular glossaries. The implications of this are explored and various other sources are suggested. A possible model for the use of sanas in Sanas Cormaic may also be found in a definition of apocrypha in Scholica graecarum glossarum.
(source: Publisher)
Russell, Paul, “Note: Virgilius filius Ramoth: Irish scribes and Irish nomenclature”, Peritia 14 (2000): 432–433.
Russell, Paul, “Laws, glossaries and legal glossaries in early Ireland”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 51 (1999): 85–115.
Russell, Paul, “What did medieval Welsh scribes do? The scribe of the Dingestow Court manuscript”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 37 (Summer, 1999): 79–96.
Russell, Paul, “Dúil Dromma Cetta and Cormac’s Glossary”, Études Celtiques 32 (1996): 147–174.
Russell, Paul, “Gwr gwynn y law: figures of speech in Gramadegau'r penceirddiaid and Latin grammarians”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 32 (Winter, 1996): 95–104.
Russell, Paul, “Orthography as a key to codicology: innovation in the work of a thirteenth-century Welsh scribe”, Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies 25 (Summer, 1993): 77–85.
Russell, Paul, “Modern Welsh -og and productivity in derivational patterns”, Journal of Celtic Linguistics 2 (1993): 151–156.
Russell, Paul, “Preverbs, prepositions and adverbs: sigmatic and asigmatic”, Transactions of the Philological Society 86 (1988, 1988): 144–172.
Russell, Paul, “The sounds of a silence: the growth of Cormac's Glossary”, Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies 15 (1988): 1–30.
Russell, Paul, “Recent work on British Latin”, Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies 9 (Summer, 1985): 19–29.
Russell, Paul, “A footnote to spirantization”, Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies 10 (Winter, 1985): 53–56.

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

Russell, Paul, “Teaching between the lines: grammar and grammatica in the classroom in early medieval Wales”, in: Hayden, Deborah, and Paul Russell (eds), Grammatica, gramadach and gramadeg: vernacular grammar and grammarians in medieval Ireland and Wales, Studies in the History of the Language Sciences 125, Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 2016. 133–148.
Russell, Paul, “Poetry by numbers: the poetic triads in Gramadegau penceirddiaid”, in: Hayden, Deborah, and Paul Russell (eds), Grammatica, gramadach and gramadeg: vernacular grammar and grammarians in medieval Ireland and Wales, Studies in the History of the Language Sciences 125, Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 2016. 161–180.
Russell, Paul, “Beyond Juvencus: an Irish context for some Old Welsh glossing?”, in: Moran, Pádraic, and Immo Warntjes (eds), Early medieval Ireland and Europe: chronology, contacts, scholarship. A Festschrift for Dáibhí Ó Cróinín, Studia Traditionis Theologiae 14, Turnhout: Brepols, 2015. 203–214.
abstract:
Starting from the Old Irish input into the glossing of the Welsh Juvencus manuscript, it is argued that there are hints that some of the Old Welsh glossing on another manuscript, St Dunstan’s Classbook, may have been created in an Irish-influenced context.
Russell, Paul, “Gwas, Guos-, Gos-: the reflexes of Brittonic *wo”, in: Oudaer, Guillaume, Gaël Hily, and Herve Le Bihan (eds), Mélanges en l’honneur de Pierre-Yves Lambert, Rennes: TIR, 2015. 77–90.
Russell, Paul, “In aliis libris: adaptation, re-working and transmission in the commentaries to Amra Choluim Chille”, in: Boyle, Elizabeth, and Deborah Hayden (eds), Authorities and adaptations: the reworking and transmission of textual sources in medieval Ireland, Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 2014. 63–93.
Russell, Paul, “Horticultural genealogy and genealogical horticulture: the metaphors of Welsh plant and Old Irish cland”, in: Henley, Georgia [ed.], Paul Russell [ed.], and Joseph F. Eska [assist ed.], Rhetoric and reality in medieval Celtic literature: studies in honor of Daniel F. Melia, CSANA Yearbook 11-12, Hamilton, NY: Colgate University Press, 2014. 155–172.
Russell, Paul, “Externarum linguarum excellens: the rhetoric and reality of the languages of Gruffudd ap Cynan, ruler of Gwynedd († 1137)”, in: Jefferson, Judith A., Ad Putter [eds.], and Amanda Hopkins [ass.], Multilingualism in medieval Britain (c. 1066–1520): sources and analysis, Medieval Texts and Cultures of Northern Europe 15, Turnhout: Brepols, 2013. 73–88.
Russell, Paul, “From compound to derivative: the development of a patronymic ‘suffix’ in Gaulish”, in: García Alonso, Juan Luis [ed.], Continental Celtic word formation: the onomastic data, Aquilafuente 197, Salamanca: Ediciones Universidad de Salamanca, 2013. 201–214.
Paul Russell, “Welsh law in medieval Anglesey: British Library Harleian MS 1796 (Latin C)”, in: Sara Elin Roberts • Bryn Jones, Cyfraith Hywel (2013).
Russell, Paul, “An habes linguam Latinam? Non tam bene sapio: views of multilingualism from the early medieval West”, in: Mullen, Alex, and Patrick James (eds.), Multilingualism in the Graeco-Roman worlds, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012. 193–224.
Edmonds, Fiona, and Paul Russell, “Preface”, in: Edmonds, Fiona, and Paul Russell (eds.), Tome: studies in medieval Celtic history and law in honour of Thomas Charles-Edwards, Studies in Celtic History 31, Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 2011. xi–xii.
Russell, Paul, “Grilling in Calcutta: Whitley Stokes, Henry Bradshaw and Old Welsh in Cambridge”, in: Boyle, Elizabeth, and Paul Russell (eds.), The tripartite life of Whitley Stokes (1830-1909), Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2011. 144–160.
Russell, Paul, “‘Ye shall know them by their names’: names and identity among the Irish and the English”, in: Graham-Campbell, James, and Michael Ryan (eds.), Anglo-Saxon/Irish relations before the Vikings, Proceedings of the British Academy 157, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009. 99–112.
Russell, Paul, “Poets, power and possessions in medieval Ireland: some stories from Sanas Cormaic”, in: Eska, Joseph F. [ed.], Law, literature and society, CSANA Yearbook 7, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2008. 9–45.
Russell, Paul, “Commentary: A. Personal names: A.1 Celtic names”, in: Rollason, David, and Lynda Rollason (eds), Durham Liber vitae: London, British Library, MS Cotton Domitian A.VII, 3 vols, vol. 2, London: British Library, 2007. 35–43.
Russell, Paul, “The names of Celtic origin”, in: Rollason, David, and Lynda Rollason (eds), Durham Liber vitae: London, British Library, MS Cotton Domitian A.VII, 3 vols, vol. 2, London: British Library, 2007. 5–8.
Russell, Paul, “‘What was best of every language’: the early history of the Irish language”, in: Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí [ed.], A new history of Ireland, vol. 1: Prehistoric and early Ireland, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005. 405–450.
Russell, Paul, “Quasi: bridging the etymological gap in early Irish glossaries”, in: Smelik, Bernadette, Rijcklof Hofman, Camiel Hamans, and David Cram (eds.), A companion in linguistics: a Festschrift for Anders Ahlqvist on the occasion of his sixtieth birthday, Nijmegen: Stichting Uitgeverij de Keltische Draak, 2005. 49–62.
Russell, Paul, “[Multiple contributions]”, in: Oxford dictionary of national biography, Online: Oxford University Press.
Russell, Paul, “Rowynniauc, Rhufoniog: the orthography and phonology of /μ/ in Early Welsh”, in: Russell, Paul [ed.], Yr hen iaith: studies in early Welsh, Celtic Studies Publications 7, Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 2003. 25–47.
Russell, Paul, “Patterns of hypocorism in early Irish hagiography”, in: Carey, John, Máire Herbert, and Pádraig Ó Riain (eds.), Studies in Irish hagiography: saints and scholars, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2001. 237–249.
Russell, Paul, “Nósa Ua Maine: ‘The customs of the Uí Mhaine’”, in: Charles-Edwards, T. M., Morfydd E. Owen, and Paul Russell (eds.), The Welsh king and his court, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2000. 527–551.
Russell, Paul, “Canu i swyddogion llys y brenin”, in: Charles-Edwards, T. M., Morfydd E. Owen, and Paul Russell (eds.), The Welsh king and his court, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2000. 552–560.
Russell, Paul, “Swydd, swyddog, swyddwr: office, officer and official”, in: Charles-Edwards, T. M., Morfydd E. Owen, and Paul Russell (eds.), The Welsh king and his court, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2000. 281–295.
Russell, Paul, “On reading Ptolemy: some methodological considerations”, in: Parsons, David N., and Patrick Sims-Williams (eds), Ptolemy: towards a linguistic atlas of the earliest Celtic place-names of Europe, Aberystwyth: CMCS Publications, 2000. 179–188.
Russell, Paul, “The Laws of Court from Latin B”, in: Charles-Edwards, T. M., Morfydd E. Owen, and Paul Russell (eds.), The Welsh king and his court, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2000. 478–526.
Russell, Paul, “Moth, toth, traeth: sex, gender and the early Irish grammarian”, in: Cram, David, Andrew Linn, and Elke Nowak (eds.), History of linguistics 1996: selected papers from the Seventh International Conference on the History of the Language Sciences, Oxford, 12–17 September 1996, vol. 1: Traditions in linguistics worldwide., Amsterdam, Philadelphia: John Benjamins, 1999. 203–213.