Tóraigheacht tána bó Flidaise

From CODECS: Online Database and e-Resources for Celtic Studies
Tóraigheacht tána bó Flidaise

    Tóraigheacht tána bó Flidaise‘The pursuit of the raid of Flidais' cattle’

    • Early Modern Irish
    • prose, verse
    • Ulster Cycle
    Early Modern Irish tale forming a sequel to Táin bó Flidaise. It relates how the Gamhanraidh go in pursuit of Fergus and the men of Ireland to recover the magical cow of Flidais, Maol Flidaise.
    Title
    Tóraigheacht tána bó Flidaise
    ‘The pursuit of the raid of Flidais' cattle’
    In the Glenmasan MS, the text is headed Toraigecht tana bo Flidaise ann so and concludes with a collective descriptor for this tale and the preceding one(s) in the manuscript, Táin bó Flidaise con a Toruigheacht. The YBL text does not give this title.
    Manuscripts
    Language
    Early Modern Irish
    Form
    prose, verse (primary)
    prosimetrum

    Classification

    Ulster Cycle
    • Sources

    Notes

    “In O'Donovan's time one leaf of this was in No. 1317” (T. K. Abbott • E. J. Gwynn, Catalogue of Irish MSS in TCD (1921): 100). See further, Tomás Ó Concheanainn, ‘The YBL Fragment of Táin Bó Flidais’, Celtica 13 (1980) and Tomás Ó Concheanainn, ‘A personal reference by Giolla Íosa Mac Fhir Bhisigh’, Celtica 18 (1986).

    Primary sources
    Text editions and/or modern translations – in whole or in part – along with publications containing additions and corrections, if known. Diplomatic editions, facsimiles and digital image reproductions of the manuscripts are not always listed here but may be found in the entry for the relevant manuscript.

    Edition wanted.
    A new, digital edition based on all manuscripts, with translation, is being prepared by Laura Malone (Lára Ní Mhaoláin).
    [ed.] [tr.] Mackinnon, Donald [ed. and tr.], “The Glenmasan manuscript [part 4]”, The Celtic Review 4 (1907–1908): 10–27, 104–121, 202–219.
    CELT – edition: <link> CELT – translation: <link> Internet Archive: <link>
    104–121 and 202–219

    Secondary sources

    Bhreathnach, Edel, “Tales of Connacht: Cath Airtig, Táin bó Flidhais, Cath Leitreach Ruibhe, and Cath Cumair”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 45 (Summer, 2003): 21–42.
    Ó hUiginn, Ruairí, “Growth and development in the late Ulster Cycle: The case of Táin Bó Flidais”, in: Nagy, Joseph Falaky [ed.], Memory and the modern in Celtic literatures, CSANA Yearbook 5, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2006. 143–161.

    Queried results

    if available
    Ó hUiginn, Ruairí, “Growth and development in the late Ulster Cycle: The case of Táin Bó Flidais”, in: Nagy, Joseph Falaky [ed.], Memory and the modern in Celtic literatures, CSANA Yearbook 5, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2006. 143–161.
    Bhreathnach, Edel, “Tales of Connacht: Cath Airtig, Táin bó Flidhais, Cath Leitreach Ruibhe, and Cath Cumair”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 45 (Summer, 2003): 21–42.
    Ó Concheanainn, Tomás, “A personal reference by Giolla Íosa Mac Fhir Bhisigh”, Celtica 18 (1986): 34.
    Ó Concheanainn, Tomás, “The YBL Fragment of Táin Bó Flidais”, Celtica 13 (1980): 56–57.
    Abbott, T. K., and E. J. Gwynn, Catalogue of the Irish manuscripts in the Library of Trinity College, Dublin, Dublin: Hodges, Figgis & Co, 1921.
    Internet Archive: <link> Internet Archive: <link>
    Mackinnon, Donald [ed. and tr.], “The Glenmasan manuscript [part 4]”, The Celtic Review 4 (1907–1908): 10–27, 104–121, 202–219.
    CELT – edition: <link> CELT – translation: <link> Internet Archive: <link>

    web page identifiers

    page name: Tóraigheacht tána bó Flidaise
    page url: //www.vanhamel.nl/codecs/T%C3%B3raigheacht_t%C3%A1na_b%C3%B3_Flidaise
    page ID: 17106
    page ID tracker: //www.vanhamel.nl/codecs/Show:ID?id=17106

    Contributors
    Dennis Groenewegen
    blog comments powered by Disqus
    CODECS is published online by Stichting A. G. van Hamel voor Keltische Studies (A. G. van Hamel Foundation for Celtic Studies) under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported (CC BY-SA 3.0) licence. Designed, directed and maintained by Dennis Groenewegen.