Texts

Würzburg glosses

  • Old Irish
  • Irish glosses

Classification

Irish glosses

Sources

Primary sources Text editions and/or modern translations – in whole or in part – along with publications containing additions and corrections, if known. Diplomatic editions, facsimiles and digital image reproductions of the manuscripts are not always listed here but may be found in entries for the relevant manuscripts. For historical purposes, early editions, transcriptions and translations are not excluded, even if their reliability does not meet modern standards.

[ed.] [tr.] Doyle, Adrian, Würzburg Irish glosses, Online: National University of Ireland, Galway. URL: <https://wuerzburg.ie>. 
abstract:
The manuscript, Codex Paulinus Wirziburgensis, contains the Latin text of the epistles of St. Paul. Marginal and interlinear glosses explaining this text have been added to the codex in three distinguishable scribal hands. Dating from about the middle of the eighth century, these glosses comprise one of the earliest large bodies of text written in Irish. The purpose of this site is to make to make the Würzburg Irish glosses available in digital format. The digital text is based on the edition of the glosses available in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus, Vol. 1 (Stokes and Strachan, 1901). Here the editors present 3,501 glosses which include Irish content, noting however, that further glosses have apparently been lost due to the age of the manuscript, and the process of its binding. This site is currently under construction. As work progresses, further functionality will be introduced allowing more in-depth interaction with the text of the glosses.
Digital edition based on that in the Thesaurus palaeohibernicus.
[ed.] Ó Néill, Pádraig P., “The Old-Irish glosses of the prima manus in Würzburg, m.p.th.f.12: text and context reconsidered”, in: Richter, Michael, and Jean-Michel Picard (eds.), Ogma: essays in Celtic studies in honour of Próinséas Ní Chatháin, Dublin: Four Courts, 2002. 230–242.
New edition of the glosses written by the prima manus.
[ed.] Stokes, Whitley, and John Strachan (eds.), Thesaurus palaeohibernicus: a collection of Old-Irish glosses, scholia, prose, and verse, 3 vols, vol. 1: Biblical glosses and scholia, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1901.  
comments: The first volume of Thesaurus palaeohibernicus covers glosses and scholia on the Old and New Testament. Reprinted by DIAS in 1975.
Internet Archive – vol. 1: <link>
499–712
[dig. img.] TITUS: Thesaurus Indogermanischer Text- und Sprachmaterialien, Online: Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main. URL: <http://titus.fkidg1.uni-frankfurt.de>.

Secondary sources (select)

Le Mair, Esther, “Secondary verbs in Old Irish: a comparative-historical study of patterns of verbal derivation in the Old Irish glosses”, unpublished Ph.D. thesis: NUI Galway, 2011.  
abstract:
This thesis concerns the word formation of secondary verbs in Old Irish. Although extensive work has been done on primary verbs, the secondary adjectives and the nouns in Old Irish, and the formation of causatives and iteratives and that of the verbal nouns in Welsh, the secondary verbs in Old Irish have been almost entirely ignored (with the exception of the deverbal verbs in -igidir), while they provide fascinating insights into the process of word formation in Celtic and Early Irish. Their importance lies especially, but not exclusively, in the obvious productivity of this morphology in Old Irish and in the visible development of the morphology from Proto-Indo-European through Old Irish. The formation of secondary verbs in any language and indeed in any stage of that language shows the creativity of the users of that language and the secondary verbs in Old Irish show the creativity of the speakers of Old Irish and its antecedents. The thesis consists of five chapters and two appendices. The first chapter contains the preliminaries, the theoretical, material and methodological basis of the thesis. The second chapter is an introduction into the Old Irish verbal system and its origins to set the stage for the remaining chapters. The third chapter is the analysis, morphological, semantic and statistical, drawn from the corpus. The fourth chapter is the conclusion. The fifth chapter contains all the secondary verbs found in the Würzburg and Milan glosses with cognates, discussion and notes. The first appendix contains those primary verbs that have taken on weak flexion and the second all the other primary verbs, for comparative purposes.
Ó Néill, Pádraig P., “The Old-Irish glosses of the prima manus in Würzburg, m.p.th.f.12: text and context reconsidered”, in: Richter, Michael, and Jean-Michel Picard (eds.), Ogma: essays in Celtic studies in honour of Próinséas Ní Chatháin, Dublin: Four Courts, 2002. 230–242.
Kavanagh, Séamus, and Dagmar S. Wodtko [ed.], A lexicon of the Old Irish glosses in the Würzburg manuscript of the epistles of St. Paul, Mitteilungen der Prähistorischen Kommission 45, Vienna: Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 2001. + cd-rom. URL: <http://hw.oeaw.ac.at/3014-7>. 
This lexicon contains a complete listing of all the Old Irish words attested in the Würzburg glosses, with a detailed morphological, syntactical and lexical analysis. It explains the semantic and grammatical content of one of the most important Old Irish gloss corpora.
Schrijver, Peter, “On the nature and origin of word-initial h- in the Würzburg glosses”, Ériu 48 (1997): 205–227.
Breen, Aidan, “The Biblical text and sources of the Würzburg Pauline glosses (Romans 1–6)”, in: Ní Chatháin, Próinséas, and Michael Richter (eds.), Irland und Europa im früheren Mittelalter: Bildung und Literatur / Ireland and Europe in the early Middle Ages: learning and literature, Stuttgart: Klett-Cotta, 1996. 9–16.
Genee, Inge, “Pragmatic aspects of verbal noun complements in Early Irish: do + VN in the Würzburg glosses”, Journal of Celtic Linguistics 3 (May, 1994): 41–73.
McKenna, Malachy, “On pecthad ‘sinner’ in the Würzburg glosses”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 44 (1991): 79.
Ní Chatháin, Próinséas, “Notes on the Würzburg glosses”, in: Ní Chatháin, Próinséas, and Michael Richter (eds.), Irland und die Christenheit: Bibelstudien und Mission. Ireland and Christendom: the Bible and the missions, Veröffentlichungen des Europa Zentrums Tübingen. Kulturwissenschaftliche Reihe, Stuttgart: Klett-Cotta, 1987. 190–199.
Schmidt, Karl Horst, “Die Würzburger Glossen”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 39 (1982): 54–77.
Armstrong, John, “Phonological irregularity in compound verb forms in the Würzburg glosses”, Ériu 27 (1976): 56–72.
Bergin, Osborn, “Notes on the Würzburg glosses”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 17 (1928): 223–224.
Pokorny, Julius, “Über das Alter der Würzburger Glossen”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 10 (1915): 36.
Journal volume:  Internet Archive: <link> Internet Archive: <link>
Fraser, J., “The prepositions in the Würzburg glosses”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 8 (1912): 1–63.
Internet Archive: <link>
Stern, Ludwig Christian, “Miscellen 7. Die Ausgabe der Würzburger Glossenhandschrift”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 7 (1910): 291.
Internet Archive: <link>
Stern, Ludwig Christian, “Bemerkungen zu dem Würzburger Glossencodex”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 6 (1908): 531–545.
Internet Archive: <link>
Zimmer, Heinrich, “Zu den Würzburger Glossen”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 6 (1908): 454–530.
Internet Archive: <link>
Thurneysen, Rudolf, “Das Alter der Würzburger Glossen”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 3 (1901): 47–54.
Internet Archive: <link>
Strachan, John, “Some notes on the Irish glosses of Würzburg and St. Gall”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 3 (1901): 55–60.
Internet Archive: <link>
Stokes, Whitley, “Mélanges: Corrections of a recent edition of the Wuerzburg glosses”, Revue Celtique 9 (1888): 104–108.
Internet Archive: <link> Internet Archive: <link>
Stokes, Whitley, “Mélanges: Notes on the Wuerzburg glosses”, Revue Celtique 9 (1888): 364–370.
Internet Archive: <link> Internet Archive: <link>
Contributors
Dennis Groenewegen
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