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|Published=No
 
|Published=No
 
|Title=<em>Metrical calendar of Hampson</em>
 
|Title=<em>Metrical calendar of Hampson</em>
|ShortDescription=Latin (hexa)metrical calendar consisting of 365 verses, with one verse for each day of the year in commemoration of saints or church feasts. It includes many Flemish and northern French saints as well as ten Irish ones (Fursa, Aed, Brigit, Fintan, Comgán, Patrick, Coemgen, Columba, Mac Táil and Máel Rúain), along with Irish church feasts, and records the deaths of King Alfred and his wife Ealhswith (d. 902). The origin and authorship of the poem are uncertain, but it is usually believed to have been produced in England.  
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|TitleInfo=Thet text is commonly known as the ‘Metrical calendar of Hampson’, after Robert Thomas Hampson, who first published an edition of the text (<em>Medii Ævi Kalendarium</em>, 1841).
|Author=Unknown. It is usually conjectured that the author was active in England. Because of the Irish element, Edmund Bishop espoused the theory that the author was an Irishman who may have been working at Alfred’s court, while the inclusion of French/Flemish saints has given rise to similar arguments in favour of a continental origin. Current views tend to be more circumspect.
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|ShortDescription=Latin metrical calendar consisting of 365 verses, with one hexametrical verse for each day of the year, primarily in commemoration of saints or church feasts. A striking feature is the inclusion of ten Irish saints, fourteen church feasts of Irish origin, six northern French and Flemish saints and the obits of King Alfred and his wife Ealhswith (d. 902). While much is unknown about the origin and authorship of the poem, it is usually thought to have been produced in England in the early part of the 10th century, probably during the reign of King Edward the Elder.
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|Description=The ten Irish saints mentioned are Fursa, Áed, Brigit, Fintan, Comgán, Patrick, Coemgen, Columba, Mac Táil and Máel Rúain. The Irish church feasts include the “Finding of the Head of John the Baptist” (27 February) and the “Feast of the Saints of Europe” (April 20). The presence of Amandus, Audomarus, Austraberta, Bertinus, Vedastus and Wulmarus has been linked to Grimbald of St-Bertin, who was active at Alfred's court and would be a possible candidate for having introduced the Galba MS into England.
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|Author=Unknown. It is usually conjectured that the author was active in England. Because of the Irish element, Edmund Bishop espoused the theory that the author was an Irishman who may have been working at Alfred’s court, while the inclusion of French/Flemish saints has given rise to similar arguments in favour of a continental origin. Current views tend to be more circumspect. McGurk: “either by an Englishman who had frequent recourse to Irish sources, or, as was suggested by Bishop, and still seems the more likely, by an Irishman working in English court circles, though these need not have been limited to Winchester”.
 
|LanguageAuto=Latin language
 
|LanguageAuto=Latin language
|Date=9th or 10th century?
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|Date=Late 9th or early 10th century. If the obits of King Alfred and Ealhswith are not later additions, then the latter provides a terminus post quem of 902. This and the suggested date of the earliest manuscript witness would make it possible to date the text to the reign of King Edward the Elder.
 
|Century1=9th century
 
|Century1=9th century
 
|Century1Part=2nd half
 
|Century1Part=2nd half

Revision as of 15:51, 13 September 2019

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