Agents
Cú Chulainn
  • Mag Muirthemne
Young Ulster hero and chief character of Táin bó Cuailnge and other tales of the Ulster Cycle; son of Súaltam or Lug and Deichtire (sister to Conchobor); husband of Emer (ingen Forgaill)
See also: LugLugNo short description available
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Conchobar mac NessaConchobar mac Nessa (ass. time-frame: Ulster Cycle) – king of the Ulaid in tales of the Ulster Cycle; son either of Cathbad or Fachtna Fáthach (father) and Ness (mother); husband of Mugain; father of Cormac Cond Longas, Cúscraid Mend Macha, Furbaide Fer Bend and Fedelm Noíchrothach; fosterfather of Cú Chulainn.
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Emer ingen ForgaillEmer ingen Forgaill / Emer (ass. time-frame: Ulster Cycle) – wife of Cú Chulainn in the Ulster Cycle of tales
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Culann the smithCulann the smith
Entry reserved for but not yet available from the subject index.
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SúaltamSúaltam
Entry reserved for but not yet available from the subject index.
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DeichtireDeichtire
Entry reserved for but not yet available from the subject index.
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Aífe ingen AirdgemeAífe ingen Airdgeme (ass. time-frame: Subject:Ulster Cycle) – Character in the Ulster Cycle of Irish literature, notably the tragic tale Aided óenfir Aífe. When the Ulster hero Cú Chulainn stays in Alba to receive training-in-arms from Scáthach (her mother or sister), Aífe has an affair with him and later gives birth to his only son. In the Yellow Book of Lecan version, Aífe is called a daughter of one Ardgeimm.
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Conall CernachConall Cernach (ass. time-frame: Ulster Cycle) – warrior of the Ulaid in the Ulster Cycle; son of Amergin and Findchóem
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Fer DiadFer Diad (ass. time-frame: Ulster Cycle) – warrior in tales of the Ulster Cycle
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Findabair [daughter of Medb and Ailill]Findabair ... daughter of Medb and Ailill (ass. time-frame: Subject:Ulster Cycle) – daughter of Medb and Ailill in the Ulster Cycle
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ScáthachScáthach (ass. time-frame: Conchobar mac Nessa, Ulster Cycle) – A warrior woman and instructor of warriors in the Ulster Cycle, notably responsible for training the hero Cú Chulainn.
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SenbeccSenbecc / Senbecc ua EibricNo short description available
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See also references for related subjects.
Boyd, Matthieu, “The timeless tale of Bricriu's feast”, North American Journal of Celtic Studies 1:2 (November, 2017): 151–172. 
abstract:
The early Irish tale Fled Bricrenn ‘Bricriu's feast’ is set at an impossible time relative to the centerpiece of the Ulster Cycle, the epic Táin bó Cúailnge. Key characters, including Bricriu himself, are not available after the Táin, while the integral episodes involving Ailill and Medb would make no sense before the Táin. The embarrassing behavior of the heroes Lóegaire and Conall is also inconsistent with the way they are portrayed in other texts. Although there are limited parallels with other kinds of medieval literature, such as the verse tradition of French Arthurian romance, these problems are most helpfully addressed by recourse to contemporary Fan Fiction studies in conjunction with the medieval concept of glossing. Even if it does contain authentic lore, Bricriu's feast comes into focus as a comically distorted, but serious-minded reflection on the rest of the Ulster Cycle, including the Táin. The major themes of this reflection include the devaluation of fame through excess of praise, and the worthiness of the hero's community to benefit from him, even as the hero's own status depends on serving their interests and enacting their values.
Edel, Doris, Inside the Táin: exploring Cú Chulainn, Fergus, Ailill, and Medb, Berlin: curach bhán, 2015. 
abstract:
This is the first literary-critical study of the Táin Bó Cúailnge in its entirety, and as an autonomous literary work. The key to a more deeply probing understanding of the semiliterate epic is the study of its characters: what they do and why they do it – why more important than what. Why reveals the differences between the various versions. Most promising is the multilayered Recension I, mainly preserved in Lebor na hUidre, which testifies of the keen interest of its compilers in the portrayal of the characters, while the version in the Book of Leinster, with its tendency to omit what might lessen the heroes’ prestige, pays for its greater unity with loss of depth. The multifacetedness of the characters in the early version, combined with the deceptive simplicity of the plot, lends the work a remarkable pragmatism. Despite occasional baroque descriptions of battle frenzy, the main heroes Cú Chulainn and Fergus embody a heroism reined in by prudence. All through the war they do everything in their power to limit the use of force. Ailill and Medb represent a new type of ruler-entrepreneur, who seeks to realize his aim at the lowest possible cost and accepts failure matter-of-factly. So the epic has no fatal end-point. The greater part of the two armies are able return to their countries. The theme of mutual destruction is relegated to the Battle of the Bulls. The lasting antagonism between the North and the remainder of the island must have endowed the Táin with contemporary significance at various points in time, as the allusions to (near-)contemporary events suggest.
(source: publisher)
Edel, Doris, “Cú Chulainn on the couch: character portrayal in Táin bó Cúailnge”, in: Toner, Gregory, and Séamus Mac Mathúna (eds), Ulidia 3: proceedings of the Third International Conference on the Ulster Cycle of Tales, University of Ulster, Coleraine 22–25 June, 2009. In memoriam Patrick Leo Henry, Berlin: curach bhán, 2013. 127–136.
Ireland, Colin, “From protected to protector: some legal language in Cú Chulainn’s boyhood deeds”, in: Huld, Martin E., Karlene Jones-Bley, and Dean Miller (eds.), Archaeology and language: Indo-European studies presented to James P. Mallory, Journal of Indo-European Studies, Monograph Series 60, Washington, D.C.: Institute for the Study of Man, 2012. 15–22. 
abstract:
Sport was the foundation of Cú Chulainn’s early training, and through sport one can see the makings of the great warrior he was to become. In his sporting and gaming activities one sees the application of early Irish law in terms of protection for the young Cú Chulainn and, subsequently, for his legal protection of others. This paper examines legal terminology that demonstrates how the young Cú Chulainn not only physically overcomes his opponents but also manages to place them legally under his protection.
Means-Shannon, Hannah, “Seeing double: the transforming personalities of Alan Moore’s Promethea and the Ulster Cycle’s Cuchulain”, Journal of Graphic Novels and Comics 1:2 (2010): 93–104.
Clarke, Michael, “An Irish Achilles and a Greek Cú Chulainn”, in: Ó hUiginn, Ruairí, and Brian Ó Catháin (eds.), Ulidia 2: proceedings of the Second International Conference on the Ulster Cycle of Tales, Maynooth 24-27 July 2005, Maynooth: An Sagart, 2009. 238–251.
Clarke, Michael, “Achilles, Byrhtnoth, and Cú Chulainn: from Homer to the medieval North”, in: Clarke, Michael, Bruno Currie, and Oliver Lyne (eds), Epic interactions: perspectives on Homer, Virgil and the epic tradition presented to Jasper Griffin by his pupils, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006. 243–272.
Ó hUiginn, Ruairí, “Rúraíocht agus Rómánsaíocht: ceisteanna faoi fhorás an traidisiúin”, Éigse 32 (2000): 77–87.
Findon, Joanne, “A woman’s words: Emer versus Cú Chulainn in Aided Óenfir Aife”, in: Mallory, James P., and Gerard Stockman (eds.), Ulidia: proceedings of the First International Conference on the Ulster Cycle of Tales, Belfast and Emain Macha, 8–12 April 1994, Belfast: December, 1994. 139–148.
Sayers, William, “Cú Chulainn, the heroic imposition of meaning on signs, and the revenge of the sign”, Incognita: International Journal for Cognitive Studies in the Humanities 2 (1991): 79–105.
Ó Fiannachta, Pádraig, “The fight with Fer Diad”, Journal of the County Louth Archaeological and Historical Society 18:1 (1973): 62–68.
Dobbs, Margaret E., “Cuchulainn, an Irishman or a Briton?”, Journal of the County Louth Archaeological Society 5:4 (1921–1924): 252–253.
Nettlau, Max, “The Fer Diad episode of the Tain Bó Cuailnge (LL. 82 a 21 – 88 b 52) (suite) [part 2]”, Revue Celtique 11 (1890): 23–32, 318–343.
Internet Archive – part 1: <link>, <link> Internet Archive – part 2: <link>, <link>