Agents
Columbanus
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Marron, Emmet, “The communities of St Columbanus: Irish monasteries on the continent?”, Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy 118C (2018): 95–122. 
abstract:
The image of the Irish saints on the continent, carrying the light of Christianity into the darkness of a Europe descended into barbarity, has proven one of the most enduring aspects of the ‘Island of Saints and Scholars’ narrative that formed part of every Irish schoolchild's education. Although this motif may persist in the popular imagination, regularly used as a shorthand for Ireland's relationship with Europe, it has been widely critiqued in recent decades as an overly nationalistic reading of the past. While recent reappraisals have focussed primarily on historical evidence, there is an enduring expectation among some that the monasteries founded by these individuals would be distinctively ‘Irish’ in their layout and material culture. This article offers a critique of this assumption by outlining the results of recent work carried out by an Irish-French team at the first of St Columbanus' continental foundations, Annegray, in Eastern France. The preliminary results of work at two of his other foundations, Luxeuil and Bobbio, are also discussed. It is argued that there is nothing inherently Irish about the material culture of these sites, nor should we expect there to be.
Diem, Albrecht, “Disputing Columbanus’s heritage: the Regula cuiusdam patris (with a translation of the rule)”, in: O'Hara, Alexander (ed.), Columbanus and the peoples of post-Roman Europe, Oxford Studies in Late Antiquity, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018. 259–306. 
abstract:
This chapter examines the Regula cuiusdam patris, a Columbanian monastic Rule from the seventh century, in the context of the disputes sourrounding Columbanus’s legacy that arose following his death. It provides an analysis of the—unique—theological program of the Regula cuiusdam patris, which dismisses the idea of a salvific effect of paenitentia and the notion of the monastery as a sacred space. A comparison with Columbanus’s own rules and Jonas of Bobbio’s Vita Columbani forms the basis for ascribing the Regula cuiusdam patris either to the monks rebelling against Athala of Bobbio or to Agrestius and his followers. The chapter provides an English translation of the Rule as an appendix.
Stancliffe, Clare, “Columbanus and shunning: the Irish peregrinus between Gildas, Gaul, and Gregory”, in: O'Hara, Alexander (ed.), Columbanus and the peoples of post-Roman Europe, Oxford Studies in Late Antiquity, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018. 113–142.
Woolf, Alex, “Columbanus’s Ulster education”, in: O'Hara, Alexander (ed.), Columbanus and the peoples of post-Roman Europe, Oxford Studies in Late Antiquity, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018. 91–99. 
abstract:
This chapter looks at the context for Columbanus’s time at Bangor and in particular the possible influence on him of the British bishop Uinniau and his own abbot, Comgall. Uinniau’s network linked him with both the British Church of Gildas and the emerging Uí Néill dynasties, while Comgall was a member of the Cruithnian people of Antrim. By the time Columbanus came within their orbit, both men were located in the core territory of the kingdom of the Ulaid, in modern County Down. The chapter argues that the specifics of the location and personalities involved proved to be defining influences on Columbanus’s development.
O'Hara, Alexander (ed.), Columbanus and the peoples of post-Roman Europe, Oxford Studies in Late Antiquity, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018.
Flechner, Roy, and Sven Meeder, “Controversies and ethnic tensions”, in: Flechner, Roy, and Sven Meeder (eds), The Irish in early medieval Europe: identity, culture and religion, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016. 195–213. 
Sections: Introduction; Columbanus as controversial figure; An Irish heretic; Ethnic tensions at St-Gall monastery; A theological controversy.
Ritari, Katja, Pilgrimage to heaven: eschatology and monastic spirituality in early medieval Ireland, Studia Traditionis Theologiae 23, Turnhout: Brepols, 2016. 
abstract:
This book focuses on the expectation of the Judgment and the afterlife in early medieval Irish monastic spirituality. It has been claimed that in the Early Middle Ages, Christianity became for the first time a truly otherworldly religion and in monastic spirituality this otherworldly perspective gained an especially prominent role. In this book, Dr Ritari explores the role of this eschatological expectation in various sources, including hagiography produced by the monastic familia of St Columba, the sermons of St Columbanus, the Navigatio sancti Brendani portraying St Brendan’s sea voyages, and the vision attributed to St Adomnán about Heaven and Hell. One recurrent image used by the Irish authors to portray the Christian path to Heaven is the image of peregrinatio, a life-long pilgrimage. Viewing human life in this perspective inevitably influenced the human relationship with the world making the monastic into a pilgrim who is not supposed to get attached to anything encountered on the way but to keep constantly in mind the end of the journey.
(source: Brepols)
[3] “Monastic life as pilgrimage: the sermons of St Columbanus”
3.a. Pilgrimage as spiritual exile; 3.b. ‘Pilgrims in the world’: the monk’s relationship with the world in the sermons of Columbanus; 3.c. The pilgrimage of life.
Diem, Albrecht, and Matthieu van der Meer [tr.], Columbanische Klosterregeln: Regula cuiusdam patris, Regula cuiusdam ad virgines, Regelfragment De accedendo, St. Ottilien: EOS-editions, 2016. 
abstract:
This book is a study and German translation of three 7th-century monastic rules published after the time of Columbanus: the Regula cuiusdam patris, Regula cuiusdam ad virgines and the treatise De accedendo ad Deum. In the introduction I argue that all three texts assert different claims to define the heritage of the Irish monk and monastic founder Columbanus, and give different responses to the theological and practical challenges Columbanian monasticism faced after his death in 615. The Regula cuiusdam patris can be read as an angry polemic against the course Columbanian monasticism took, and might be associated with Agrestius, one of the antagonists of Columbanus’ successor Eusthasius of Luxeuil. The Regula cuiusdam ad virgines was probably written by Jonas of Bobbio as a counterpart to his Life of Columbanus. Both texts together form the program of Columbanian (or Hiberno-Frankish) monasticism as propagated by Jonas. De accedendo ad Deum may have originally been a chapter of the Regula cuiusdam ad virgines. As such it would form the theological core of the rule. The text provides a highly elaborate rationale for why and how monastic discipline enables a community to pray effectively for forgiveness of sins, to perform intercessory prayer and to attain salvation.
Stansbury, Mark, “The ‘private’ books of the Bobbio catalogue”, in: Moran, Pádraic, and Immo Warntjes (eds), Early medieval Ireland and Europe: chronology, contacts, scholarship. A Festschrift for Dáibhí Ó Cróinín, Studia Traditionis Theologiae 14, Turnhout: Brepols, 2015. 625–641. 
abstract:
In the first three hundred years of its history, the library at the monastery founded by Columbanus at Bobbio recorded books held in common, books held by individual monks, and books donated. By examining the books held by individual monks we can identify the books associated with elementary monastic education and duties within the monastery.
Bisagni, Jacopo, “A new citation from a work of Columbanus in BnF lat. 6400b”, Peritia 24–25 (2013-2014): 116–122. 
abstract:
The author argues that a section of the newly-discovered eighth-century Irish computistica in Paris, BnF, lat. 6400b may contain a citation from a (lost?) work of Columbanus.
Fox, Yaniv, Power and religion in Merovingian Gaul: Columbanian monasticism and the Frankish elites, Cambridge Studies in Medieval Life and Thought (Fourth Series), Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014. 
abstract:
This study is the first to attempt a thorough investigation of the activities of the Columbanian congregation, which played a significant role in the development of Western monasticism. This was a new form of rural monasticism, which suited the needs and aspirations of a Christian elite eager to express its power and prestige in religious terms. Contrary to earlier studies, which viewed Columbanus and his disciples primarily as religious innovators, this book focuses on the political, economic, and familial implications of monastic patronage and on the benefits elite patrons stood to reap. While founding families were in a privileged position to court royal favour, monastic patronage also exposed them to violent reprisals from competing factions. Columbanian monasteries were not serene havens of contemplation, but rather active foci of power and wealth, and quickly became integral elements of early medieval statecraft.
(source: publisher)
Richter, Michael, Bobbio in the early Middle Ages: the abiding legacy of Columbanus, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2008.
Flechner, Roy, “Dagán, Columbanus, and the Gregorian mission”, Peritia 19 (2005): 65–90. 
abstract:
An attempt to sketch the biography of Dagán, the Irish bishop who met the Gregorian missionaries in Kent, and to establish whether the Irish church concerned itself with the mission. Several categories of sources are considered: contemporary epistles (by Gregory, Columbanus, Lawrence), annals, canon law (Hibernensis, Synodus Patricii) liturgical material (Stowe Missal, martyrologies), hagiography (saints’ Lives and genealogies), saga (Bórama), and Bede’s HE.
Stancliffe, Clare E., “Jonas’s Life of Columbanus and his disciples”, in: Carey, John, Máire Herbert, and Pádraig Ó Riain (eds.), Studies in Irish hagiography: saints and scholars, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2001. 189–220.
Lapidge, Michael, “Epilogue: did Columbanus compose metrical verse?”, in: Lapidge, Michael (ed.), Columbanus: studies on the Latin writings, Studies in Celtic History 17, Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 1997. 274–285.
Lapidge, Michael, “Precamur patrem: an Easter hymn by Columbanus?”, in: Lapidge, Michael (ed.), Columbanus: studies on the Latin writings, Studies in Celtic History 17, Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 1997. 255–263.
Stancliffe, Clare, “Venantius Fortunatus, Ireland, Jerome: the evidence of Precamur patrem”, Peritia 10 (1996): 91–97. 
abstract:
The Irish hymn Precamur patrem does not draw on hymns of Venantius Fortunatus; rather prallels in Precamur patrem and Fortunatus’s hymns occur because both draw on Jerome’s letters. This strengthens the case for Columbanus’s authorship of the hymn while demolishing the evidence for the transmission of Fortunatus’s hymns from Poitiers to early medieval Ireland.
Mackey, James P., “The theology of Columbanus”, in: Ní Chatháin, Próinséas, and Michael Richter (eds.), Irland und Europa im früheren Mittelalter: Bildung und Literatur / Ireland and Europe in the early Middle Ages: learning and literature, Stuttgart: Klett-Cotta, 1996. 228–239.
Lapidge, Michael, “Columbanus and the Antiphonary of Bangor”, Peritia 4 (1985): 104–116.
Smit, Johannes W., Studies on the language and style of Columba the Younger (Columbanus), Amsterdam: Adolf M. Hakkert, 1971.
Association des amis de St. Colomban, Luxeuil (ed.), Mélanges colombaniens: actes du Congrès international de Luxeuil, 20–23 juillet 1950, Bibliothèque de la Société d'Histoire Ecclésiastique de la France, Paris: Alsatia, 1951.
Bieler, Ludwig, “The humanism of St Columbanus”, in: Association des amis de St. Colomban, Luxeuil (ed.), Mélanges colombaniens: actes du Congrès international de Luxeuil, 20–23 juillet 1950, Bibliothèque de la Société d'Histoire Ecclésiastique de la France, Paris: Alsatia, 1951. 95–102.
Bieler, Ludwig, “Versus sancti Columbani: a problem re-stated”, The Irish Ecclesiastical Record, 5th series, 76 (1951): 376–382.
Manitius, Max, Geschichte der lateinischen Literatur des Mittelalters, 3 vols, vol. 1: Von Justinian bis zur Mitte des zehnten Jahrhunderts, Munich: Beck, 1911.
Digital.ub.uni-duesseldorf.de: <link>
181   [22] “Columbanus”
Krusch, Bruno, “Chronologisches aus Handschriften”, Neues Archiv der Gesellschaft für Ältere Deutsche Geschichtskunde 10 (1885): 81–94.