Agents

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Conall Cernach
warrior of the Ulaid in the Ulster Cycle; son of Amergin and Findchóem
See also: Cú ChulainnCú Chulainn – Young Ulster hero and chief character of Táin bó Cuailnge and other tales of the Ulster Cycle; son of Súaltam or Lug and Deichtire (sister to Conchobor); husband of Emer (ingen Forgaill)
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AmerginAmergin
Entry reserved for but not yet available from the subject index.
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FindchóemFindchóem
Entry reserved for but not yet available from the subject index.
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Cet mac MágachCet mac Mátach, Cet mac Mágach (ass. time-frame: Ulster Cycle, Legendary figure) – warrior in the Ulster Cycle of tales; hero of Connacht; in some texts, brother of Findchóem and uncle of Conall Cernach.
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Lugaid LaígseLugaid Laígse, Lugaid Loígse – ancestor figure for the Loígis (Loíges); listed in the genealogies as a descendant of Conall Cernach.
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See also references for related subjects.
Boyd, Matthieu, “The timeless tale of Bricriu's feast”, North American Journal of Celtic Studies 1:2 (November, 2017): 151–172.
Sayers, William, “Portraits of the Ulster hero Conall Cernach: a case for Waardenburg’s syndrome?”, Emania 20 (2006): 75–80.
Sayers, William, “Severed heads under Conall’s knee (Scéla mucce Meic Dathó)”, Mankind Quarterly 34 (1994): 369–378.
Mallory, James P., “The career of Conall Cernach”, Emania 6 (Spring, 1989): 22–28.
Dobbs, Margaret E., “The traditions of Conall Cernach”, The Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland, 6th series, 59 (1929): 116–127.


  • Middle Irish
  • lists (document genres)
  • Medieval Irish literature
  • early Irish literature
  • Middle Irish
  • Ulster Cycle
  • Benn Étair
  • Athirne
  • Conall Cernach
  • Cú Chulainn
  • ail-geis
  • geis
  • Leborcham
  • Early Irish
  • remscéla to Táin bó Cúailnge
  • Ulster Cycle
  • Aífe ingen Airdgeme
  • Conchobar mac Nessa
  • Conall Cernach
  • Cú Chulainn
  • Lóegaire Búadach
  • Emer ingen Forgaill
  • Scáthach
  • Cycles of the Kings
A composite Middle Irish tale about the reign and (threefold) death of Díarmait mac Cerbaill, king of Ireland. A common theme is the king’s violation of ecclesiastical sanctuary or protection.
  • Aided
  • Cycles of the Kings
  • Díarmait mac Cerbaill
  • Ciarán (mac int Shaír) of Clonmacnoise
  • Ruadán of Lorrha
  • Brénainn of Birr
  • Colum Cille
  • Old Irish
  • Ulster Cycle
  • Cú Chulainn
  • Conall Cernach
  • DUBTHACH MACCU LUGAIR (ascr.)
  • Early Irish
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Uí Chennselaig
  • Énna(e) Cennselach mac Labrada
  • Crimthann mac Énnai Chennselaig
  • Old Irish
  • remscéla to Táin bó Cúailnge
  • Ulster Cycle
  • Ailill mac Máta
  • Conall Cernach
  • Fráech
  • Medb of Crúachan
  • Findabair
A tale of the Ulster Cycle, set after the death of Conchobar.
  • Middle Irish
  • Ulster Cycle
  • Ailill mac Máta
  • Amairgen mac Eccit (Salaig)
  • The Badb
  • Cet mac Mágach
  • Conall Cernach
  • Cormac Cond Longas
  • Craiphtine ... Ulster Cycle
  • Cúscraid Mend Macha
  • Da Coca
  • Dubthach Dóel Ulad
  • Fergus mac Róich
  • Medb of Crúachan
Medieval Irish saga concerning the career of Conchobar mac Nessa, king of the Ulaid
  • Early Middle Irish
  • Ulster Cycle
  • Conchobar mac Nessa
  • Bricriu
  • Cathbad
  • Conall Cernach
  • Cú Chulainn
  • Fergus mac Róich
  • Ness ingen Echach Sálbuidi
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Ulster Cycle
  • Ailill mac Máta
  • Conall Cernach
  • Medb of Crúachan
  • Middle Irish
  • Medieval Irish literature about poets
  • Ulster Cycle
  • Athirne
  • Cathbad
  • Celtchar (mac Uithechair)
  • Conall Cernach
  • Conchobar mac Nessa
  • Cú Chulainn
  • Cúscraid Mend Macha
  • Eógan mac Durthacht
  • Manannán mac Lir
  • Munremar mac Gerrcind
  • Leborcham
  • Sencha mac Ailella
  • Old Irish
  • Ulster Cycle
  • Ailill mac Máta
  • Bricriu
  • Celtchar (mac Uithechair)
  • Cet mac Mágach
  • Conall Cernach
  • Conchobar mac Nessa
  • Cúscraid Mend Macha
  • Eógan mac Durthacht
  • Fergus mac Róich
  • Lóegaire Búadach
  • Medb of Crúachan
  • Munremar mac Gerrcind
  • Mac Da Thó
  • Crimthann Nia Nair
  • Lugaid mac Con Roí
Short tale about the only son of Cú Chulainn and Aífe, and the boy’s death at the hands of his father. This entry covers two versions: (1) AOA I = a late Old Irish text preserved in the Yellow Book of Lecan, which is the best known version, and (2) AOA II = a younger, much abridged version in TCD 1336, which serves to introduce the topic of legal accountability and compensation (corpdíre).
  • Ulster Cycle
  • Connla (var. Connláech) or Conla; or Óenfir Aífe (‘Aífe’s only son’)
  • Aífe ingen Airdgeme
  • Scáthach
  • Cú Chulainn
  • Conchobar mac Nessa
  • Trácht Éise
Poem consisting of a series of questions, with the answer given in prose form in interlinear gloss.
  • EOCHAID EOLACH UA CÉIRÍN
  • EOCHAID EOLACH UA CÉIRÍN (ascr.)
  • Middle Irish
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Irish legendary history
  • Mythological Cycle
A tale of the Ulster Cycle, set after the death of Conchobar.
  • Middle Irish
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Aideda
  • Ulster Cycle
  • Cet mac Mágach
  • Conall Cernach
  • Bélchú Bréifne
  • Bréifne
  • Áth Ceit
  • Ulster Cycle
  • Bricriu
  • Cú Chulainn
  • Conall Cernach
  • Lóegaire Búadach
  • Cú Roí (mac Dáiri)
  • Old Irish
  • Middle Irish
  • Early Modern Irish
  • Ulster Cycle
  • Táin bó Cúailnge
  • Amairgen mac Eccit (Salaig)
  • Cathbad
  • Cethern mac Fintain
  • Conall Cernach
  • Conchobar mac Nessa
  • Cormac Cond Longas
  • Cú Chulainn
  • Cú Roí (mac Dáiri)
  • Dubthach Dóel Ulad
  • Eógan mac Durthacht
  • Fer Diad
  • Fergus mac Róich
  • Findabair, Finnabair
  • Fráech
  • Lug
  • The seven Maines
  • Medb of Crúachan
  • The Morrígan
  • Munremar mac Gerrcind
  • Aillil mac Máta
  • Togla
  • Cycles of the Kings
  • Ulster Cycle
  • Conaire Mór
  • Conall Cernach
  • Da Derga
Dinnshenchas Érenn A, Dinnshenchas Érenn C
Dinnshenchas poem mostly on Achall, i.e. the Hill of Skreen, Co. Meath, with prose on Duma nEirc and Duma nAichle. Both the poem and the prose text offer the story according to which Achall died of grief for her brother Erc, who was killed in vengeance for Cú Chulainn’s death, and was buried in the mound that would bear her name.
  • CINÁED ÚA HARTACÁIN (ascr.)
  • Middle Irish
  • Dinnshenchas
  • Early Irish poetry
  • Dinnshenchas Érenn
  • Ulster Cycle
  • revenge