Agents
Crawford (Barbara E.)
  • s. xx / s. xxi


Crawford, Barbara E., “The kingdom of Man and the earldom of Orkney—some comparisons”, in: Sigurðsson, Jón Viðar, and Timothy Bolton (eds), Celtic-Norse relationships in the Irish Sea in the Middle Ages 800-1200, The Northern World 65, Leiden, Boston: Brill, 2014. 65–80.
Crawford, Barbara E. [ed.], Conversion and Christianity in the North Sea world, St John's House Papers 8, St Andrews, Fife: Committee for Dark Age Studies, University of St Andrews, 1998.
Internet Archive: <link>
Crawford, Barbara E. [ed.], Scotland in Dark Age Britain, St John's House Papers 6, St Andrews, Fife: Scottish Cultural Press, 1996.  
The proceedings of a day conference held on 18 February 1995
Internet Archive: <link>
Crawford, Barbara E. [ed.], Scotland in Dark Age Europe, St John's House Papers 5, St Andrews, Fife: Committee for Dark Age Studies, University of St Andrews, 1994.  
The proceedings of a day conference held on 20 February 1993
Internet Archive: <link>

As honouree

Smith, Beverley Ballin, Simon Taylor, and Gareth Williams (eds), West over sea: studies in Scandinavian sea-borne expansion and settlement before 1300: a Festschrift in honour of Dr. Barbara E. Crawford, The Northern World 31, Leiden: Brill, 2007.  
abstract:
This volume is a collection of 30 papers on the broad subject of the Scandinavian expansion westwards to Britain, Ireland and the North Atlantic, with a particular emphasis on settlement. The volume has been prepared in tribute to the work of Barbara E. Crawford on this subject, and to celebrate the twentieth anniversary of the publication of her seminal book, Scandinavian Scotland. Reflecting Dr Crawford's interests, the papers cover a range of disciplines, and are arranged into four main sections: History and Cultural Contacts; The Church and the Cult of Saints; Archaeology, Material Culture and Settlement; Place-Names and Language. The combination provides a variety of new perspectives both on the Viking expansion and on Scandinavia's continued contacts across the North Sea in the post-Viking period.