Agents
John Scottus Eriugena
  • fl 9th century
  • Irish people in continental Europe, scribes, scholars
  • Laon
Irish scholar and theologian who had been active as a teacher at the palace school of Charles the Bald.
See also: Charles the BaldCharles the Bald
Entry reserved for but not yet available from the subject index.
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AldelmusAldelmus (s. ix) – scholar known from an attribution to a table of computus, where he is called a brother of John Scottus Eriugena.
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Israel the GrammarianIsrael the Grammarian (fl. c.900-c.970) – Tenth-century teacher, scholar and poet. He had been a student of John Scottus Eriugena, spent time at the court of King Æthelstan, found a new patron in Rotbert, archbishop of Trier, and became tutor to Bruno, brother of Otto I and later archbishop of Cologne. Breton, Welsh and Irish origins have been variously ascribed to him, with the Breton hypothesis currently finding most favour in scholarship.
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See also references for related subjects.
Otten, Willemien, “Eriugena on natures (created, human and divine)”, in: Moulin, Isabelle [ed.], Philosophie et théologie chez Jean Scot Érigène, Publications de l'Institut d'études médiévales de l'Institut catholique de Paris, Paris: VRIN, 2016. 113–133.
Flechner, Roy, and Sven Meeder, “Controversies and ethnic tensions”, in: Flechner, Roy, and Sven Meeder (eds), The Irish in early medieval Europe: identity, culture and religion, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016. 195–213.  
Sections: Introduction; Columbanus as controversial figure; An Irish heretic; Ethnic tensions at St-Gall monastery; A theological controversy.
Moulin, Isabelle [ed.], Philosophie et théologie chez Jean Scot Érigène, Publications de l'Institut d'études médiévales de l'Institut catholique de Paris, Paris: VRIN, 2016.
Dutton, Paul E., “Eriugena and Virgil”, in: Otten, Willemien, and Michael I. Allen (eds), Eriugena and Creation: proceedings of the Eleventh International Conference on Eriugenian Studies, held in honor of Edouard Jeauneau, Chicago, 9–12 November 2011, Turnhout: Brepols, 2014. 3–30.  
abstract:
Virgil was one of Eriugena’s companion authors, but the Irishman’s attitude toward and use of the Poet was complex and varied. As a teacher of the liberal arts, Eriugena mined Virgil for information on mythology, ancient geography, and grammar. As a poet, he adopted many Virgilian phrases and poetic patterns. As a philosopher, he cited Virgil as the coiner of sublime descriptions of the early cosmos. But as a Christian, he rejected the fictions peddled as truths by the epic poets Homer and Virgil. “Eriugena and Virgil” surveys the extant evidence of Eriugena’s knowledge of Virgil and supplies, in an appendix, all the identified citations and uses of Virgil by Eriugena. The study explores the reasons for Eriugena’s guardedness in employing Virgil, and argues that we need to approach Eriugena’s use of Virgil piece by piece and work by work. Eriugena was all at once aware of how deeply indebted he was to Virgil and of how dangerous and entrancing the Poet could be. And so he tried to keep his distance, when he could, from the Poet.
Carey, John, “The sea and the spirit: two notes”, in: Sheehan, Sarah, Joanne Findon, and Westley Follett (eds.), Gablánach in scélaigecht: Celtic studies in honour of Ann Dooley, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2013. 26–37.
26–31   [Note 1] “Profundissimum diuinae cognitionis pelagus: the Irish context of Eriugena’s voyage of the mind”
Otten, Willemien, “Creation and epiphanic incarnation. Reflections on the future of natural theology from an Eriugenian-Emersonian perspective”, in: Hellemans, Babette, Willemien Otten, and Burcht Pranger (eds), On religion and memory, New York: Fordham University Press, 2013. 64–88.
Petruccione, John F., “The glosses of Prudentius’s Peristephanon in Leiden, Universiteitsbibliotheek, Burmann Quarto 3 (Bur. Q. 3) and their relationship to a lost commentary”, The Journal of Medieval Latin 23 (2013): 295–333.  
abstract:
Burmann Quarto 3, a ninth-century manuscript of the works of Prudentius, is well known to philologists and art historians, to the former (under the siglum E) as a major source for the text of the poems, to the latter for its illustrations of the Psychomachia. This article focuses on the glosses to Peristephanon. First, I describe the hands of the seven main glossators and attempt to identify those who, in addition to glossing, corrected and/or punctuated the poetic text. I then provide the editio princeps of the glosses, in which I arrange the glosses by hand. A comparison of these glosses with those in Paris, B.N. lat. 8086 (P) suggests that the first two glossators of E and the first glossator of P drew on a common source; indeed, the two manuscripts show so many similarities that it looks quite possible that they were written in the same scriptorium. From a comparison of the E and P glosses on Pe. to those found in other manuscripts of approximately the same period, I infer that E and P preserve material from a lost commentary on Pe. composed by Johannes Scotus Eriugena, which, a generation later, became the basis for the extant commentary by Remigius of Auxerre. I find support for this theory in the fact that, in their wording and content, the glosses of E and P on Contra Symmachum sometimes agree with those of John against the corresponding glosses of Remigius.
Otten, Willemien, “Le langage de l’union mystique: le désir et le corps dans l’oeuvre de Jean Scot Érigène et de Maître Eckhart”, tr. Geneviève Lachance, Les études philosophiques 104 — Érigène (2013): 121–141.  
abstract:
L’article propose une analyse comparative de la pensée mystique de Jean Scot Érigène (810-877) et de Maître Eckhart (1260-1328). Nuançant les critiques contemporaines relatives au rôle joué par l’expérience dans le mysticisme médiéval, il défend la position selon laquelle il est préférable d’instaurer une comparaison sémantique détaillée de la pensée de ces deux auteurs plutôt que de diviser le mysticisme médiéval en fonction de l’influence mystique augustinienne ou dionysienne décelable chez chacun d’entre eux. L’auteure mène une telle analyse en se reposant sur l’utilisation du concept d’incarnation comme principe sémantique fécond et non comme doctrine théologique. Tandis qu’Érigène utilise ce concept pour engager la conversation avec le divin (utilisation « horizontale »), Eckhart s’en sert pour donner naissance à une vision mystique plus incisive (utilisation « verticale »). Nuançant également l’idée selon laquelle l’apophase est une caractéristique commune de la tradition néoplatonicienne médiévale, l’auteure montre qu’Érigène et Eckhart utilisent l’apophase pour obtenir des effets fort différents. Guidés par leur désir de percer tout mécanisme de la contemplation mystique sans pour autant discréditer l’expérience en tant que telle, Érigène et Eckhart ne conçoivent pas l’apophase en contradiction avec la corporalité, mais l’utilisent pour affirmer l’ordre sous-jacent et le caractère commun de la nature et de la vie.
Herren, Michael W., “John Scottus and Greek mythology: reprising an ancient hermeneutic in the Paris commentary on Martianus Capella”, The Journal of Medieval Latin 22 (2012): 95–116.  
abstract:
The essay opens with a brief discussion of Martianus Capella’s De nuptiis Philologiae et Mercurii, and sets out some possible reasons for its popularity with medieval scholars. De nuptiis was known in Ireland by the seventh century, and John Scottus Eriugena might have read it there. In any case, he wrote two versions of a commentary on the work, the longer of which (P = Paris, BnF, MS lat. 12960) is considerably more interesting for its exegetical method. The allegoresis of secular texts had been largely neglected since Fulgentius (sixth century), and was only reprised in the diffuse commentary tradition on Martianus that preceded Eriugena’s study of that text. However, in the P commentary John appears to be working towards a sophisticated exegetical system that embodies what the author himself calls “the laws of allegory.” John employs the terms fabulose and physice (“in the mythical sense” and “in the physical sense”), which, as is argued, correspond to Neoplatonic psychological allegoresis and Stoic physical allegoresis respectively. Although the terms appear to be similar to those used by Augustine in the De civitate Dei (drawing on Varro), John uses them differently. The source of his terminology remains problematic, though one might speculate on the use of a Greek work.
(source: Brepols)
Lendinara, Patrizia, “The scholia Graecarum glossarum and Martianus Capella”, in: Teeuwen, Mariken, and Sinéad O'Sullivan (eds), Carolingian scholarship and Martianus Capella: ninth-century commentary traditions on De nuptiis in context, Cultural Encounters in Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages 12, Turnhout: Brepols, 2012. 301–361.
Luhtala, Anneli, “On early medieval divisions of knowledge”, in: Teeuwen, Mariken, and Sinéad O'Sullivan (eds), Carolingian scholarship and Martianus Capella: ninth-century commentary traditions on De nuptiis in context, Cultural Encounters in Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages 12, Turnhout: Brepols, 2012. 75–98.
Otten, Willemien, “Overshadowing or foreshadowing return: the role of demons in Eriugena’s Periphyseon”, in: Vos, N. M., and Willemien Otten (eds), Demons and the Devil in ancient and medieval Christianity, Leiden: Brill, 2011. 211–229.
Otten, Willemien, “Does the canon need converting? A meditation on Augustine’s Soliloquies, Eriugena’s Periphyseon, and the dialogue with the religious past”, in: Otten, Willemien, Arjo Vanderjagt, and Hent de Vries (eds), How the West was won. Essays on literary imagination, the canon, and the Christian Middle Ages for Burcht Pranger, Leiden: Brill, 2010. 195–223.
Erismann, Christophe, “The medieval fortunes of the Opuscula sacra”, in: Marenbon, John [ed.], The Cambridge companion to Boethius, Cambridge Companions to Philosophy, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009. 155–178.  
abstract:
Boethius wrote five treatises of Christian theology grouped under the title Opuscula sacra. At least three of them - among which the two most important ones, the De Trinitate (OS I) and the Contra Eutychen et Nestorium (OS V) - deal with Trinitarian or Christological issues. These treatises came to take a central part in medieval thought and had a surprisingly wide influence upon it. During the Middle Ages, the danger of heresies was a less urgent topic than it had been during the first centuries of Christianity, a time marked by frequent doctrinal disputes. Arius and Nestorius were no longer a danger for a now established dogma and, in the Latin West, the Church was unified. In consequence, the Opuscula sacra were no longer topical because of their rooting in doctrinal controversies; they appeared less as a display of militant strength in the struggle of orthodoxy against heresy. Once transferred into the intellectual context of the medieval Latin West, they took on a new life, distant from the task of defending Christian dogma, but central to philosophical thought. From the beginning of the Middle Ages onwards, the influence of the Opuscula sacra reached beyond dogmatic theology, into the fields of logic, ontology and metaphysics. For 400 years, from the ninth to the twelfth centuries, the Opuscula were among the reference texts of philosophers, beside Aristotle's Categories (or its paraphrase, the Categoriae decem) and Peri hermeneias, and Porphyry’s Isagoge.
(source: CUP)
comments: Discussion touches on John Scottus Eriugena and glosses on Boethius attributed to John.
Moran, Dermot, “John Scottus Eriugena”, Zalta, Edward N. [ed.], The Stanford encyclopedia of philosophy, Online: Center for the Study of Language and Information (CSLI), Stanford University. URL: <http://plato.stanford.edu/archives/fall2008/entries/scottus-eriugena>.
Otten, Willemien, “Nature, body and text in early medieval theology: from Eriugena to Chartres”, in: Treschow, M., Willemien Otten, and W. Hannam (eds), Divine creation in ancient, medieval, and early modern thought. Essays presented to the Rev. Dr. Robert D. Crouse, Leiden: Brill, 2007. 235–256.
Otten, Willemien, “Eriugena, Emerson, and the poetics of universal nature”, in: Berchman, R., and J. Finamore (eds), Metaphysical patterns in Platonism: ancient, medieval, Renaissance, and modern times, New Orleans: University Press of the South, 2007. 147–163.
Otten, Willemien, “Anthropology between imago mundi and imago Dei: the place of Johannes Scottus Eriugena in the tradition of Christian thought”, in: Young, F., M. Edwards, and P. Parvis (eds), Augustine, other Latin writers. Papers presented at the Fourteenth International Conference on Patristic Studies held in Oxford 2003, Studia Patristica 43, Leuven: Peeters, 2006. 459–472.
Erismann, Christophe, “L’influence latine de l’ontologie de Porphyre: le cas de Jean Scot Érigène”, Revue des Sciences philosophiques et théologiques 88 (2004): 401–460.
Jeauneau, Édouard, Iohannes Scottus Eriugena: Periphyseon, 5 vols, Corpus Christianorum, Continuatio Mediaevalis 161, 162, 163, 164, 165, Turnhout: Brepols, 1996–2003.
Riel, Gerd van, “Eriugenian studies 1995–2000”, in: McEvoy, J., and M. Dunne (eds), History and eschatology in John Scottus Eriugena and his time. Proceedings of the Tenth International Conference of the Society for the Promotion of Eriugenian Studies, Maynooth and Dublin, August 16–20, 2000, Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (series 1), Leuven: Leuven University Press, 2002. 611–636.
McEvoy, J., and M. Dunne (eds), History and eschatology in John Scottus Eriugena and his time. Proceedings of the Tenth International Conference of the Society for the Promotion of Eriugenian Studies, Maynooth and Dublin, August 16–20, 2000, Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (series 1), Leuven: Leuven University Press, 2002.
Moran, Dermot, “Time and eternity in the Periphyseon”, in: McEvoy, J., and M. Dunne (eds), History and eschatology in John Scottus Eriugena and his time. Proceedings of the Tenth International Conference of the Society for the Promotion of Eriugenian Studies, Maynooth and Dublin, August 16–20, 2000, Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (series 1), Leuven: Leuven University Press, 2002. 487–507.
Otten, Willemien, “The pedagogical aspect of Eriugena’s eschatology: Paradise between the letter and the spirit”, in: McEvoy, J., and M. Dunne (eds), History and eschatology in John Scottus Eriugena and his time. Proceedings of the Tenth International Conference of the Society for the Promotion of Eriugenian Studies, Maynooth and Dublin, August 16–20, 2000, Ancient and Medieval Philosophy (series 1), Leuven: Leuven University Press, 2002. 509–526.
Otten, Willemien, “Realized eschatology or philosophical idealism: the case of Eriugena’s Periphyseon”, in: Aertsen, J. A., and M. Pickavé (eds), Ende und Vollendung: eschatologische Perspektiven im Mittelalter, New York, Cologne: De Gruyter, 2001. 373–387.
Dutton, Paul Edward, “Minding Irish P’s and Q’s: signs of the first systematic reading of Eriugena’s Periphyseon”, in: Brown, Jacqueline, and William P. Stoneman (eds), A distinct voice: medieval studies in honor of Leonard E. Boyle, O.P., Notre Dame, Indiana: University of Notre Dame Press, 1997. 14–31.
Otten, Willemien, “The parallelism of nature and scripture: reflections on Eriugena’s incarnational exegesis”, in: Riel, Gerd van, Carlos Steel, and James J. McEvoy (eds), Johannes Scottus Eriugena. The Bible and hermeneutics. Proceedings of the Ninth International Colloquium of the Society for the Promotion of Eriugenian Studies held at Leuven and Louvain-la-Neuve, June 7–10, 1995, Ancient and Medieval Philosophy 1.20, Leuven: Leuven University Press, 1996. 81–102.
Moran, Dermot, “Eriugena’s theory of language in the Periphyseon: explorations in the Neoplatonic tradition”, in: Ní Chatháin, Próinséas, and Michael Richter (eds.), Irland und Europa im früheren Mittelalter: Bildung und Literatur / Ireland and Europe in the early Middle Ages: learning and literature, Stuttgart: Klett-Cotta, 1996. 240–260.
Riel, Gerd van, Carlos Steel, and James J. McEvoy (eds), Johannes Scottus Eriugena. The Bible and hermeneutics. Proceedings of the Ninth International Colloquium of the Society for the Promotion of Eriugenian Studies held at Leuven and Louvain-la-Neuve, June 7–10, 1995, Ancient and Medieval Philosophy 1.20, Leuven: Leuven University Press, 1996.
Jeauneau, Édouard, and Paul Edward Dutton, The autograph of Eriugena, Corpus Christianorum, Medieval Latin Series, Autographa Medii Aeui 3, Turnhout: Brepols, 1996.  
abstract:
The great paleographer Ludwig Traube was the first to suggest that the actual handwriting of John Scottus Eriugena could be identified. In this new study, the first full examination of the problem of Eriugena's handwriting, the authors not only systematically review the evidence, but suggest a solution. Their identification of the autograph is based upon a detailed palaeographical and philological examination of the surviving examples of the scripts of the two Irishmen who wrote in the twelve ninth-century manuscripts associated directly with Eriugena and his school.
(source: Brepols)
Otten, Willemien, “Eriugena’s Periphyseon: a Carolingian contribution to the theological tradition”, in: McGinn, Bernard, and Willemien Otten (eds), Eriugena: east and west. Papers of the Eighth International Symposium of the Society for the Promotion of Eriugenian Studies, Chicago and Notre Dame, 18–20 October, 1991, Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press, 1994. 69–93.
McGinn, Bernard, and Willemien Otten (eds), Eriugena: east and west. Papers of the Eighth International Symposium of the Society for the Promotion of Eriugenian Studies, Chicago and Notre Dame, 18–20 October, 1991, Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press, 1994.
Otten, Willemien, “Eriugena and the concept of eastern versus western patristic influence”, in: Livingstone, E. A. [ed.], Other Latin authors, Nachleben of the Fathers, Index Patrum. Papers presented at the Eleventh International Conference on Patristic Studies held in Oxford 1991, Studia Patristica 28, Louvain: Peeters, 1993. 217–224.
Herren, Michael W., Iohannis Scotti Eriugenae carmina, Scriptores Latini Hiberniae 12, Dublin: School of Celtic Studies, DIAS, 1993.
Dutton, P. E., “Evidence that Dubthach’s Priscian codex once belonged to Eriugena”, in: Westra, Haijo Jan (ed.), From Athens to Chartres: neoplatonism and medieval thought. Studies in honour of Édouard Jeauneau, Studien und Texte zur Geistesgeschichte des Mittelalters 35, Leiden: Brill, 1992. 15–45.
Moran, Dermot, “Time, space and matter in John Scottus Eriugena: an examination of Eriugena’s account of the physical world”, in: O'Rourke, Fran [ed.], At the heart of the real: philosophical essays in honour of the Most Reverend Desmond Connell, Archbishop of Dublin, Dublin: Irish Academic Press, 1992. 67–96.
Otten, Willemien, “Between damnation and redemption: the dynamics of human nature in Eriugena’s Periphyseon and Alan of Lille’s Anticlaudianus”, in: Westra, Haijo Jan (ed.), From Athens to Chartres: neoplatonism and medieval thought. Studies in honour of Édouard Jeauneau, Studien und Texte zur Geistesgeschichte des Mittelalters 35, Leiden: Brill, 1992. 329–349.
Jeauneau, Édouard, “Heiric d’Auxerre disciple de Jean Scot”, in: Iogna-Prat, Dominique, Colette Jeudy, and Guy Lobrichon (eds), L’école carolingienne d’Auxerre: de Murethach à Rémi 830–908, Paris: Beauchesne, 1991. 353–370.
Otten, Willemien, The anthropology of Johannes Scottus Eriugena, Studies in Intellectual History 20, Leiden: E. J. Brill, 1991.  
abstract:
This book deals with Eriugena’s anthropology in the general context of his thinking on universal nature.

At the outset the role of man seems to be conditioned by nature's dynamic development through the Neoplatonic stages of procession and return. As man is located at the turning- point between procession and return, he is not only governed by nature's unfolding, but can also exercise control over it. Thus it is shown that man should be seen as much more independent than the cosmological structure of Eriugena's philosophy of nature seems to indicate.

The study of Eriugena's anthropology urges a re-evaluation of the position of man in the early medieval period. Although man characteristically possesses a sinful, created state, Eriugena shows that this does not prevent him from entertaining a free and direct relationship with God and the surrounding universe. In dealing with the problem of human sin, Eriugena brings out Christ’s saving role, but it seems counterbalanced by man’s intrinsic potential as the "divine image" to rehabilitate himself. In this respect Eriugena’s flexible method of reasoning – his handling of negative theology, theophany and allegorical exegesis – serves as a remarkable example of human independence in what has so often been portrayed as the "static" early-medieval world.
(source: Brill)
Otten, Willemien, “Eriugena’s dialectic of the return”, Harvard Theological Review 84 (1991): 399–421.
Otten, Willemien, “Some perspectives in Eriugenian studies: three recent publications”, Freiburger Zeitschrift für Philosophie und Theologie 37 (1990): 515–526.
Beierwaltes, Werner [ed.], Begriff und Metapher. Sprachform des Denkens bei Eriugena, Heidelberg: Carl Winter Universitätsverlag, 1990.
Otten, Willemien, “The interplay of nature and man in the Periphyseon of Johannes Scottus Eriugena”, Vivarium 28 (1990): 1–16.
Otten, Willemien, “The universe of nature and the universe of man: difference and identity”, in: Beierwaltes, Werner [ed.], Begriff und Metapher. Sprachform des Denkens bei Eriugena, Heidelberg: Carl Winter Universitätsverlag, 1990. 202–212.
Leonardi, Claudio, Giovanni Scoto nel suo tempo. L’organizzazione del sapere in eta carolingia. Atti del XXIV Convegno storico internazionale, Todi 11–14 ottobre 1987, Spoleto: Centro italiano di studi sull'alto medioevo, 1989.
Brennan, Mary, Guide des études Érigéniennes: bibliographie commentée des publications 1930–1987 / A guide to Eriugenian studies: a survey of publications 1930–1987, Vestigia 5, Fribourg, Paris: Editions Universitaires; Editions du Cerf, 1989.
Herren, Michael W., “St. Gall 48: a copy of Eriugena's glossed Greek gospels”, in: Bernt, Günter, Fidel Rädle, and Gabriel Silagi (eds), Tradition und Wertung: Festschrift für Franz Brunhölzl zum 65. Geburtstag, Sigmaringen: Jan Thorbecke, 1989. 97–105.
Moran, Dermot, The philosophy of John Scottus Eriugena. A study of idealism in the Middle Ages, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989.
Otten, Willemien, “The role of man in the Eriugenian universe: dependence or autonomy”, in: Leonardi, Claudio, Giovanni Scoto nel suo tempo. L’organizzazione del sapere in eta carolingia. Atti del XXIV Convegno storico internazionale, Todi 11–14 ottobre 1987, Spoleto: Centro italiano di studi sull'alto medioevo, 1989. 595–609.
Otten, Willemien, “De zondeval; over rationalisme en verbeelding bij Johannes Scottus Eriugena”, in: Harbers, Marjan, and G. M. Naarden (eds), Tussen Nijl en Herengracht: een bundel t.g.v. het afscheid van prof. dr. M. S. H. G. Heerma van Voss, Amsterdam: Universiteit van Amsterdam, Faculteit der Godgeleerdheid, 1988. 115–121.
Jeauneau, Édouard, Études erigéniennes, Études augustiniennes 18, Paris: Études augustiniennes, 1987.
85–132   “Jean Scot Erigène et le grec”
Otten, Willemien, “The influence of Eriugenian thought: report on the International Eriugena Colloquium, Bad Homburg, 26–30 August 1985”, Studi Medievali, 3rd series, 27 (1986): 461–473.
Ó Néill, Pádraig P., “The Old-Irish words in Eriugena’s biblical glosses”, in: Allard, Guy H. [ed.], Jean Scot écrivain: actes du 4e Colloque international, Montréal, 28 août - 2 septembre 1983, Cahiers d'études médiévales. Cahiers spécial 1, Montréal: Bellarmin-Vrin, 1986. 287–297.
Allard, Guy H. [ed.], Jean Scot écrivain: actes du 4e Colloque international, Montréal, 28 août - 2 septembre 1983, Cahiers d'études médiévales. Cahiers spécial 1, Montréal: Bellarmin-Vrin, 1986.
Brennan, Mary, “Materials for the biography of Johannes Scottus Eriugena”, Studi Medievali, 3rd series, 27 (1986): 413–460.
Bishop, T. A. M., “Periphyseon: the descent of the uncompleted copy”, in: Whitelock, Dorothy, Rosamund McKitterick, and David N. Dumville (eds.), Ireland in early medieval Europe: studies in memory of Kathleen Hughes, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1982. 281–304.
Schrimpf, Gangolf, “Der Beitrag des Johannes Scottus Eriugena zum Prädestinationsstreit”, in: Löwe, Heinz [ed.], Die Iren und Europa im früheren Mittelalter, 2 vols, vol. 2, Veröffentlichungen des Europa-Zentrums Tübingen. Kulturwissenschaftliche Reihe, Stuttgart: Klett-Cotta, 1982. 819–865.
Jeauneau, Édouard, “Jean Scot Érigène et le grec”, Bulletin du Cange: Archivum Latinitatis Medii Aevi 41 (1979): 5–50.
Contreni, John J., The cathedral school of Laon from 850 to 930: its manuscripts and masters, Münchener Beiträge zur Mediävistik und Renaissance-Forschung 29, Munich: Arbeo-Gesellschaft, 1978.  
comments: Based on the author's dissertation (1971)
[Ch. 7] “John Scottus and the Irish ‘colony’ at Laon”
Le Bourdellès, R., “Connaissance du grec et méthodes de traduction dans le monde carolingien jusqu’à Scot Erigène”, in: Roques, René (ed.), Jean Scot Érigène et l’histoire de la philosophie: Laon 7–12 Juillet 1975, Colloques internationaux du CNRS 561, Paris: CNRS Éditions, 1977. 117–123.
Leonardi, Claudio, “Glose eriugeniane a Marziano Capella in un codice Leidense”, in: Roques, René (ed.), Jean Scot Érigène et l’histoire de la philosophie: Laon 7–12 Juillet 1975, Colloques internationaux du CNRS 561, Paris: CNRS Éditions, 1977. 171–182.
Brennan, Mary, “A bibliography of publications in the field of Eriugena studies 1800–1975”, Studi Medievali, 3rd series, 18 (1977): 401–447.
Préaux, J. G., “Jean Scot et Martin de Laon en face du De nuptiis de Martianus Capella”, in: Roques, René (ed.), Jean Scot Érigène et l’histoire de la philosophie: Laon 7–12 Juillet 1975, Colloques internationaux du CNRS 561, Paris: CNRS Éditions, 1977. 161–170.
Contreni, John J., “The Irish ‘colony’ at Laon during the time of John Scottus”, in: Roques, René (ed.), Jean Scot Érigène et l’histoire de la philosophie: Laon 7–12 Juillet 1975, Colloques internationaux du CNRS 561, Paris: CNRS Éditions, 1977. 59–67.
Bischoff, Bernhard, and Édouard Jeauneau, “Ein neuer Text aus der Gedankenwelt des Johannes Scottus”, in: Roques, René (ed.), Jean Scot Érigène et l’histoire de la philosophie: Laon 7–12 Juillet 1975, Colloques internationaux du CNRS 561, Paris: CNRS Éditions, 1977. 109–116.
Roques, René (ed.), Jean Scot Érigène et l’histoire de la philosophie: Laon 7–12 Juillet 1975, Colloques internationaux du CNRS 561, Paris: CNRS Éditions, 1977.
O'Meara, John J., and Ludwig Bieler (eds), The mind of Eriugena: papers of a colloquium, Dublin, 14–18 July, 1970, Dublin: Irish University Press, 1973.
Kenney, James F., “Chapter VI: The expansion of Irish Christianity”, in: Kenney, James F., The sources for the early history of Ireland: an introduction and guide. Volume 1: ecclesiastical, Records of Civilization: Sources and Studies 11, Revised ed. (1929), New York: Octagon, 1966. 486–621.
569–589   [VIII] “Johannes Eriugena and the Irish colony of Laon and Reims”
Bibliography; Introduction; 377. Dunchad; (i) Computistical notes ... 398. Psilotrum; postscript
[378] “Johannes Eriugena: Extracts from Macrobius (Excerpta Macrobii de differentiis et societatibus graeci latinique verbi)”
[379] “Johannes Eriugena: Commentary on Martianus Capella”
[380] “Translation of the Solutiones of Lydius Priscus”
[381] “Johannes Eriugena: On predestination”
[382] “Prudentius: On predestination, in reply to Johannes Scottus”
[383] “Florus: Book against Johannes Scottus”
[384] “Remigius of Lyons: Book on the three epistles”
[385] “Council of Valence AD 855; Council of Langres AD 859”
[386] “Johannes Eriugena: Translation of the works of Dionysius the Areopagite”
[387] “Pope Nicholas I: Letter to King Charles the Bald”
[388] “Anastastius: Letter to Charles the Bald”
[389] “Johannes Eriugena: Commentary on Dionysius the Areopagite”
[390] “Johannes Eriugena: Translation of the Ambigua of Maximus Confessor”
[391] “Johannes Eriugena: περί φύσεων μερισμοῦ, id est, De divisione naturae
[392] “Johannes Eriugena: Commentary on the Opuscula sacra of Boethius”
[393] “Life of Boethius”
[394] “Homily on the prologue to the Gospel of St John, attributed to John Scottus Eriugena”
[395] “Johannnes Eriugena: Commentary on the Gospel of St John. Four fragments”
[396] “Commentary on the Old Testament attributed to Johannes Eriugena”
[397] “The poems of Johannes Eriugena”
[398] “Psilotrum
Silvestre, Hubert, “Jean Scot Érigène, commentateur de Prudence”, Scriptorium 10:1 (1956): 90–92.
Lutz, Cora E., Iohannis Scotti Annotationes in Marcianum, Cambridge, Mass.: Mediaeval Academy of America, 1939.
Manitius, Max, Geschichte der lateinischen Literatur des Mittelalters, 3 vols, vol. 1: Von Justinian bis zur Mitte des zehnten Jahrhunderts, Munich: Beck, 1911.
Digital.ub.uni-duesseldorf.de: <link>
323   [46] “Johannes Scottus”
Traube, Ludwig, Poetae Latini aevi Carolini, vol. 3, MGH Antiquitates, Berlin: Weidmann, 1896.
Dmgh.de: <link>
518   [Iohannis Scotti carmina] 
Prooemium (pp. 618-526); poems edited: 1. beg. Caesare sub Karolo Francorum gloria pollet; 2. (i) beg. Hellinas Troasque suos cantaret Homerus, (ii) Aspice praeclarum radiis solaribus orbem, (iii) Auribus Aebraicis notum si dixero pascha, (iv) Haec nostram dominam Yrmindrudis nomine claram, (v) Mystica sanctorum panduntur dogmata patrum, (vi) beg. Emicat ex Erebo lux mundi magna triumphans; (vii) Στιχοι του Ιωαννου τω βασιλει Καρολω, beg. Lux superans animas hominum superumque deorum, (viii) Οι στιχοι τοι Ιωαννου τω κυρριω αιτου το ανακτο Καρολω, beg. Si vis Ουρανιας sursum volitare per aurus; 3. (i) Στιχοι Ιωαννις glorioso regi Karolo, (ii) (Στιχοι) τοι Ιοαννοι τω κιρριω Καρωλω, (iii) Ζες νυν ζης βασιλης πλιστους εις τοις ενιαυτους, (iv) Φαθνην, (v) Ιδε βαθου ταναθου την ταυ ταπτεντος εγερσιν, (vi) Ερηνη πικτω δημω βακιλει η κλεορ ακρω, (vii) Τριαδις αναρχον φισεος [?]οσμιφεραμ, (viii) Nam κακος atque αρατος, (ix) Λιτουρλου γαυρως βεβαιως υψηλος, (x) Λαμπροτατος κηρυζ στιλβων κηρυγματος ακρου, (xi) κατα ταζιν σοθωσ, (xii) κρυσματα non noscens nec κυμπλερασμα requirens, (xiii) θεος υπεραληθης φομευος χορδαν; 4. (i) Versvs Ιωηαννις Σκωφφι, beg. Postquam nostra salus mundum renovaverat omnem, (ii) Item stichos eivsdem, beg. Graculus Iudaeus iam nunc, Agarenus et auster; 5. (i) Κυρριε Καρολε, (ii) Ζωην αοινιον δωσει σοι παντοτε Χριστος, (iii) Σωμα σταυρω βαθου αρμοδιος, (iv) Τω κιρριω Καρολω Ιωαννης χαιρειν, beg. Θαυμαστω βασιλει Καρολω ζωη τε φαος τε; 6. beg. Semeron autokrator fronimos kai timie Karle; 7. (i) beg. Hanc libam sacro Graecorum nectare fartam; (ii) beg. Lumine sidereo Dionysius auxit Athenas; 8. (i) Kyrrie, caeligenae cui pollet gratia formae, (ii) Quisquis rhetorico verborum syrmate gaudet, (iii) Quisquis amat formam pulchrae laudare sophiae; 9. Versus Iohannis Scotti ad Karolum regem, beg. Aulae sidereae paralelos undique circos; 10. Hic iacet Hincmarus cleptes vehementer avarus.