Agents
Russell (Paul)
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Russell, Paul, and Alex Mullen, A database of the Celtic personal names of Roman Britain (CPNRB), Online: Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic, University of Cambridge. URL: <https://www.asnc.cam.ac.uk/personalnames/>. 
abstract:
This database collects all the personal names from Roman Britain which are thought to contain Celtic elements. While personal names from Gaul have received considerable attention over the years in works such as GPN and KGP, the huge increase in the number of names (from the finds in Bath and Vindolanda, together with the publication of RIB II) now makes it imperative that the data is available in a easily searchable format. It is hoped that this database will offer a useful and flexible tool by which the information provided by personal names from Roman Britain can be integrated into the scholarship both of Roman Britain and of name-studies more generally (for a discussion based on the epigraphic data published up to and including 2005, see Mullen 2007a). If funding were available, this database might be a prototype for a much-needed database of all personal names attested from Roman Britain.
Russell, Paul, “Distinctions, foundations and steps: the metaphors of the grades of comparison in medieval Latin, Irish and Welsh grammatical texts”, Language & History 63 (2020): 47–72.  
abstract:
While the ‘grades’ of comparison is a familiar term, it is argued in this paper that a more thorough-going appreciation of a metaphor which originally had to do with steps allows us better to understand the development of the terminology of the grades of comparison as it moved from the Latin grammarians, especially Donatus and the commentators on his original work, into the medieval vernacular Irish and Welsh grammars. The architectural basis of the terminology, then, once identified, may help to clarify the use of such terms as Old Irish etargaire and how in Welsh grwndwal (lit.) ‘ground-wall’ came to be used of the positive form of the adjective.
Russell, Paul, “Networks of letters: correspondence between Rhys, Stokes, and Bradshaw”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 77 (2019): 17–31.
Russell, Paul, “Brenhin uu: reading the death of kings in Culhwch ac Olwen”, North American Journal of Celtic Studies 3:1 (2019): 55–64.
Journal volume:  – Issue 1: <link> – Issue 2: <link>
Russell, Paul, “Anders Ahlqvist: 17 February 1945 – 23 August 2018”, North American Journal of Celtic Studies 3:2 (2019): 198–200.
Journal volume:  – Issue 1: <link> – Issue 2: <link>
Russell, Paul, Reading Ovid in medieval Wales, Text and Context, Ohio: Ohio State University, 2017.
Russell, Paul, “Aduỽyn gaer yssyd: an early Welsh poem revisited”, Celtica 29 (2017): 6–37.
Russell, Paul, “Canyt oes aruer: Gwilym Wasta and the laws of court in Welsh law”, North American Journal of Celtic Studies 1:2 (November, 2017): 173–188.  
abstract:
It is conventional to divide the manuscript tradition of the Blegywryd redaction of the Welsh laws into two groups depending on whether they contain the Laws of Court and where the triads are positioned. It has long been recognised that Gwilym Wasta (working ca. 1300) was the scribe of the three manuscripts which do not contain the Laws of Court and that in three of the manuscripts he replaced them with a colophon in which he seems to claim that he has omitted them because they were no longer in use. This paper argues that matters might be rather more complicated and that the omission of the Laws of Court may have been more by accident than design.
Russell, Paul, “From plates and rods to royal drink-stands in Branwen and medieval Welsh law”, North American Journal of Celtic Studies 1:1 (May, 2017): 1–26.  
abstract:
This paper takes as its starting point the well-known passage in Branwen about the compensation for Matholwch and its relationship to the Iorwerth redaction of medieval Welsh law. It argues, first, that the text of Branwen need not be emended by reference to the Iorwerth redaction. It then traces the textual development of the legal passage from a silver rod and gold plate in Iorwerth to an elaborate royal drink-stand in the other redactions. It follows Robin Chapman Stacey in suggesting that the Iorwerth redaction has maintained a simple version of this text to ensure the text is seen as unexceptional from a broader European perspective of kingship. Finally, it returns to a particular aspect of these descriptions, the Welsh and Latin terms used for fingers which present a confused and muddled picture.
Russell, Paul, “Poetry by numbers: the poetic triads in Gramadegau penceirddiaid”, in: Hayden, Deborah, and Paul Russell (eds), Grammatica, gramadach and gramadeg: vernacular grammar and grammarians in medieval Ireland and Wales, Studies in the History of the Language Sciences 125, Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 2016. xvi + 226 pp. 161–180.
Russell, Paul, “Priuilegium sancti Teliaui and Breint Teilo”, Studia Celtica 50 (2016): 41–68.
Hayden, Deborah, and Paul Russell (eds), Grammatica, gramadach and gramadeg: vernacular grammar and grammarians in medieval Ireland and Wales, Studies in the History of the Language Sciences 125, Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 2016. xvi + 226 pp.  
abstract:
Grammatica, gramadach, and gramadeg: vernacular grammar and grammarians in medieval Ireland and Wales is concerned with the history of linguistic ideas and literary theory in the vernacular languages of medieval Ireland and Wales. While much good work, especially by Vivian Law, has been done on the Latin materials, this volume is the first to engage with the vernacular texts. It consists of ten essays that explore a range of interconnected topics relating to these themes. Yet while the contributors offer a close analysis of the development of linguistic thought in these literary traditions, they likewise seek to situate their discussions within the wider context of European grammatical learning during this period, considering both the widespread influence of texts from classical linguistic tradition and also the significance of sources from other contemporary learned disciplines for our understanding of the history of linguistics in the medieval world.
Russell, Paul, “Teaching between the lines: grammar and grammatica in the classroom in early medieval Wales”, in: Hayden, Deborah, and Paul Russell (eds), Grammatica, gramadach and gramadeg: vernacular grammar and grammarians in medieval Ireland and Wales, Studies in the History of the Language Sciences 125, Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 2016. xvi + 226 pp. 133–148.
Russell, Paul, “Beyond Juvencus: an Irish context for some Old Welsh glossing?”, in: Moran, Pádraic, and Immo Warntjes (eds), Early medieval Ireland and Europe: chronology, contacts, scholarship. A Festschrift for Dáibhí Ó Cróinín, Studia Traditionis Theologiae 14, Turnhout: Brepols, 2015. 203–214.  
abstract:
Starting from the Old Irish input into the glossing of the Welsh Juvencus manuscript, it is argued that there are hints that some of the Old Welsh glossing on another manuscript, St Dunstan’s Classbook, may have been created in an Irish-influenced context.
Russell, Paul, “Gwas, Guos-, Gos-: the reflexes of Brittonic *wo”, in: Oudaer, Guillaume, Gaël Hily, and Herve Le Bihan (eds), Mélanges en l’honneur de Pierre-Yves Lambert, Rennes: TIR, 2015. 77–90.
Russell, Paul, “Horticultural genealogy and genealogical horticulture: the metaphors of Welsh plant and Old Irish cland”, in: Henley, Georgia [ed.], Paul Russell [ed.], and Joseph F. Eska [assist ed.], Rhetoric and reality in medieval Celtic literature: studies in honor of Daniel F. Melia, CSANA Yearbook 11–12, Hamilton, NY: Colgate University Press, 2014. 155–172.
Henley, Georgia [ed.], Paul Russell [ed.], and Joseph F. Eska [assist ed.], Rhetoric and reality in medieval Celtic literature: studies in honor of Daniel F. Melia, CSANA Yearbook 11–12, Hamilton, NY: Colgate University Press, 2014.
Russell, Paul, “In aliis libris: adaptation, re-working and transmission in the commentaries to Amra Choluim Chille”, in: Boyle, Elizabeth, and Deborah Hayden (eds), Authorities and adaptations: the reworking and transmission of textual sources in medieval Ireland, Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 2014. 63–93.
Russell, Paul, “From compound to derivative: the development of a patronymic ‘suffix’ in Gaulish”, in: García Alonso, Juan Luis [ed.], Continental Celtic word formation: the onomastic data, Aquilafuente 197, Salamanca: Ediciones Universidad de Salamanca, 2013. 201–214.
Russell, Paul, “Externarum linguarum excellens: the rhetoric and reality of the languages of Gruffudd ap Cynan, ruler of Gwynedd († 1137)”, in: Jefferson, Judith A., Ad Putter [eds.], and Amanda Hopkins [ass.], Multilingualism in medieval Britain (c. 1066–1520): sources and analysis, Medieval Texts and Cultures of Northern Europe 15, Turnhout: Brepols, 2013. 73–88.
Russell, Paul, “Revisiting the ‘Welsh dictator’ of the Old English Orosius”, Quaestio Insularis 12 (2011, 2012): 31–62.
Russell, Paul, “Culhwch’s weaponry : Penntireg and Enilleg”, Études Celtiques 38 (2012): 259–269.  
abstract:
[FR] L’armement de Culhwch : Penntireg et Ennilleg
Dans le passage de Culhwch ag Olwen qui montre Culhwch allant à cheval à la cour d’Arthur, les deux manuscrits, le Livre Blanc et le Livre Rouge, emploient l’expression gleif penntirec pour désigner son arme. Une correction proposée par Thomas Jones s’est imposée maintenant comme la norme : elle consiste à corriger penntirec en ennillec, et à considérer que gleif était au départ une glose à ennillec qui a été introduite dans le texte principal ; ainsi, l’édition Evans-Bromwich donne ici gleif (ennillec). On montrera que la correction est mal assurée et qu’il vaut mieux restaurer le mot penntirec dans le texte de Culhwch, ainsi que dans le lexique du moyen-gallois. L’étude réexamine l’étymologie et le sens des termes ennillec et penntirec, en supposant qu’à l’origine ces deux noms d’armes avaient approximativement le même sens, «arme permettant d’accumuler des propriétés » .

[EN] In the passage in Culhwch ag Olwen where Culhwch is riding towards Arthur’s court, both the White and Red Books use the term gleif penntirec to describe his weapon. Following a suggestion by Thomas Jones, it has been conventional to emend penntirec to ennillec and to assume that gleif was in origin a gloss on ennillec which was incorporated into the text ; thus the edition of Evans and Bromwich reads gleif (ennillec) at this point. It is argued here that the emendation is unwarranted and that penntirec should be restored to the text of Culhwch and to the lexicon of Middle Welsh. The paper reconsiders the etymologies and meanings of the terms enillec and penntirec, arguing that in origin they were both terms for weapons with a broadly similar sense of ’ a weapon with which possessions are accumulated’.
Journal volume:  Persée – Études Celtiques, vol. 38, 2012: <link>
Russell, Paul, “An habes linguam Latinam? Non tam bene sapio: views of multilingualism from the early medieval West”, in: Mullen, Alex, and Patrick James (eds.), Multilingualism in the Graeco-Roman worlds, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012. 193–224.
Russell, Paul, “The englyn to St Padarn revisited”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 63 (Summer, 2012): 1–14.
Russell, Paul, “Latin and British in Roman and Post-Roman Britain: methodology and morphology”, Transactions of the Philological Society 109:2 (July, 2011): 138–157.