Bibliography

Tomás
Ó Carragáin
s. xx / s. xxi

9 publications between 2003 and 2020 indexed
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Works authored

Ó Carragáin, Tomás, Churches in early medieval Ireland: architecture, ritual and memory, Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art Series, New Haven, London: Yale University Press, 2010. xvi + 392 pp + 298 ill..


Contributions to journals

Ó Carragáin, Tomás, “Is there an archaeology of lay people at early Irish monasteries?”, BUCEMA 8 (2015). URL: <https://doi.org/10.4000/cem.13620>.
Ó Carragáin, Tomás, “The archaeology of ecclesiastical estates in early medieval Ireland: a case study of the kingdom of Fir Maige”, Peritia 24–25 (2013-2014): 266–312.  
abstract:
The first detailed archaeological study of ecclesiastical estates in early medieval Ireland. Using the fine-grained territorial framework of Fir Maige, the settlement archaeology of its three main ecclesiastical estates is analysed: those of Findchú, Molaga and Cránaid. Significant variations are noted. These may reflect varying emphases in clientship versus direct labour. Landscape archaeology can therefore make a significant contribution to understanding the socio-economic strategies of important ecclesiastical sites. Churches on the boundaries of both the estate of Molaga and the kingdom in which it lies are here seen as conscious expressions of christianisation and sovereignty when the latter was under threat. This illustrates how christianisation was often a political process as well as a religious one.
abstract:
The first detailed archaeological study of ecclesiastical estates in early medieval Ireland. Using the fine-grained territorial framework of Fir Maige, the settlement archaeology of its three main ecclesiastical estates is analysed: those of Findchú, Molaga and Cránaid. Significant variations are noted. These may reflect varying emphases in clientship versus direct labour. Landscape archaeology can therefore make a significant contribution to understanding the socio-economic strategies of important ecclesiastical sites. Churches on the boundaries of both the estate of Molaga and the kingdom in which it lies are here seen as conscious expressions of christianisation and sovereignty when the latter was under threat. This illustrates how christianisation was often a political process as well as a religious one.
Ó Carragáin, Tomás, “Archaeology of early medieval baptism at St Mullin’s, Co Carlow”, Peritia 21 (2010): 285–302.  
abstract:
Archaeological and documentary evidence is used to argue that the superstructure of St Moling’s Well, Co Carlow, is a baptismal chapel of round 1100, probably built in the context of a heightened concern with the proper administration of the sacrament during the Gregorian reform. In earlier centuries, baptism in the open air, at holy wells and springs seems to have been common. Other water-based rituals carried out at St Mullin’s in medieval times are also considered.
abstract:
Archaeological and documentary evidence is used to argue that the superstructure of St Moling’s Well, Co Carlow, is a baptismal chapel of round 1100, probably built in the context of a heightened concern with the proper administration of the sacrament during the Gregorian reform. In earlier centuries, baptism in the open air, at holy wells and springs seems to have been common. Other water-based rituals carried out at St Mullin’s in medieval times are also considered.
Ó Carragáin, Tomás, “The architectural setting of the cult of relics in early medieval Ireland”, Journal of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland 133 (2003): 130–176.

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

Ó Carragáin, Tomás, “Landscapes, myth-making and memory: ecclesiastical landholding in early medieval Ireland”, in: Wooding, Jonathan M., and Lynette Olson (eds), Prophecy, fate and memory in the early medieval Celtic world, Sydney: Sydney University Press, 2020. 34–51.
Ó Carragáin, Tomás, “More Scottorum: buildings of worship in Ireland, c. 400-950”, in: Barnwell, P. S. (ed.), Places of worship in Britain and Ireland, 300–950, Rewley House Studies in the Historic Environment 4, Donington: Shaun Tyas, 2015. 56–67.
Ó Carragáin, Tomás, “Cemetery settlements and local churches in pre-Viking Ireland in light of comparisons with England and Wales”, in: Graham-Campbell, James, and Michael Ryan (eds), Anglo-Saxon/Irish relations before the Vikings, Proceedings of the British Academy 157, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009. 329–366.
Ó Carragáin, Tomás, “The saint and the sacred centre: the pilgrimage landscape of Inishmurray”, in: Edwards, Nancy (ed.), The archaeology of the early medieval Celtic churches: proceedings of a conference on the archaeology of the early medieval Celtic churches, September 2004, The Society for Medieval Archaeology Monographs 29, Leeds, London: Maney Publishing; Routledge, 2009. 207–226.