Bibliography

Pádraig
Ó Riain
s. xx / s. xxi

73 publications between 1968 and ? indexed
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Works authored

Ó Riain, Pádraig, The martyrology of the Regensburg Schottenkloster, London: Henry Bradshaw Society, 2019.  
Incl. three appendices: 1: Necrology and diary of the Regensburg Schottenkloster; 2: Irish saints in CSOW and T on days now lacking in MReg; 3: Daily excerpts from the Rule of St Benedict (20.1-4.12) and from the Pseudo-Bernard Documenta pie seu religiose vivendi (5-19.12).
abstract:
The earliest Irish martyrology was compiled in prose and verse at Tallaght, near Dublin, about the year 830. Little has hitherto been known of its circulation before the period 1150-60, when the surviving copy of the prose version was made. Now, through the martyrology of the Regensburg Schottenkloster, we know that a copy of the metrical version had reached Bavaria in the southern part of Germany by the late tenth century, where it was used, first by the Irish monks of the Regensburg Schottenkloster, then as a source of entries in other local German martyrologies. The martyrology, edited here for the first time, bears witness, therefore, to the circulation in Bavaria of this originally Irish compilation and, together with other documents, shows how the Scottish Benedictine monks, who succeeded the Irish in several monasteries in southern Germany and Austria, adapted to their own use a number of essentially Irish liturgical documents.
Incl. three appendices: 1: Necrology and diary of the Regensburg Schottenkloster; 2: Irish saints in CSOW and T on days now lacking in MReg; 3: Daily excerpts from the Rule of St Benedict (20.1-4.12) and from the Pseudo-Bernard Documenta pie seu religiose vivendi (5-19.12).
abstract:
The earliest Irish martyrology was compiled in prose and verse at Tallaght, near Dublin, about the year 830. Little has hitherto been known of its circulation before the period 1150-60, when the surviving copy of the prose version was made. Now, through the martyrology of the Regensburg Schottenkloster, we know that a copy of the metrical version had reached Bavaria in the southern part of Germany by the late tenth century, where it was used, first by the Irish monks of the Regensburg Schottenkloster, then as a source of entries in other local German martyrologies. The martyrology, edited here for the first time, bears witness, therefore, to the circulation in Bavaria of this originally Irish compilation and, together with other documents, shows how the Scottish Benedictine monks, who succeeded the Irish in several monasteries in southern Germany and Austria, adapted to their own use a number of essentially Irish liturgical documents.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, Four Offaly saints: the Lives of Ciarán of Clonmacnoise, Ciarán of Seir, Colmán of Lynally and Fíonán of Kinnitty, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2018.  
abstract:
Lying just south of the line that divided Ireland’s two halves, Leath Chuinn to the north and Leath Mhogha to the south, the churches of the present county of Offaly could scarcely have been other than places of exceptional importance. A vision attributed to Finnian of Clonard saw a silver moon rise above Clonmacnoise that brought brightness and light to the mid-parts of Ireland, and another vision attributed to Ciarán himself showed the shadow of his church protecting every part of the country, north and south. For its part, Seirkieran laid claim to having been one of the first churches founded in Ireland, by its saint, another Ciarán, who was acting on instructions received from St Patrick, before the latter ever brought Christianity to the country. Seirkieran had a claim to cathedral status in Ossory over a long period. Lynally’s patron Colmán was of northern origin and his church provided abbots to certain northern churches over several centuries. By way of contrast, Kinnitty’s saint Fíonán was reputedly of Kerry origin, and this is reflected in the Life written for him, which brings him down to west Munster on numerous occasions. Connections such as these bear witness to the important role played by the churches of Offaly in the history of early Irish Christianity. The four Lives in this volume, which are translated from Latin originals, contain much of interest countrywide.
abstract:
Lying just south of the line that divided Ireland’s two halves, Leath Chuinn to the north and Leath Mhogha to the south, the churches of the present county of Offaly could scarcely have been other than places of exceptional importance. A vision attributed to Finnian of Clonard saw a silver moon rise above Clonmacnoise that brought brightness and light to the mid-parts of Ireland, and another vision attributed to Ciarán himself showed the shadow of his church protecting every part of the country, north and south. For its part, Seirkieran laid claim to having been one of the first churches founded in Ireland, by its saint, another Ciarán, who was acting on instructions received from St Patrick, before the latter ever brought Christianity to the country. Seirkieran had a claim to cathedral status in Ossory over a long period. Lynally’s patron Colmán was of northern origin and his church provided abbots to certain northern churches over several centuries. By way of contrast, Kinnitty’s saint Fíonán was reputedly of Kerry origin, and this is reflected in the Life written for him, which brings him down to west Munster on numerous occasions. Connections such as these bear witness to the important role played by the churches of Offaly in the history of early Irish Christianity. The four Lives in this volume, which are translated from Latin originals, contain much of interest countrywide.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, Beatha Ailbhe: The life of Ailbhe, Irish Texts Society 67, London: Irish Texts Society, 2017.  
abstract:
Ailbhe, patron of the diocese of Cashel and Emly, a ‘second Patrick’ with ‘all Munster behind him’, was the most prominent southern Irish saint to have been made the subject of a Life. In this volume, all surviving textual witnesses, Latin and Irish, to Ailbhe’s Life are brought together under one cover. Each of the Latin and Irish texts is provided with an English translation. The Latin version of the saint’s Life in Rawlinson MS 505, and the vernacular version in Brussels MS 2324-40 are edited here for the first time.
comments: Contents: Preface; 1. Previous work on the Lives of St Ailbhe; 2. Contents of the Life; 3. Manuscripts, editions and character of the various recensions; 4. The Codex Samanticensis (S) version of the Latin Life; 5. The Rawlinson (R) version of Ailbhe's Life; 6. The Trinity College (T) and Marsh's Library (M) version of the Life; 7. The vernacular version of the Life; Commentary; Appendices.
abstract:
Ailbhe, patron of the diocese of Cashel and Emly, a ‘second Patrick’ with ‘all Munster behind him’, was the most prominent southern Irish saint to have been made the subject of a Life. In this volume, all surviving textual witnesses, Latin and Irish, to Ailbhe’s Life are brought together under one cover. Each of the Latin and Irish texts is provided with an English translation. The Latin version of the saint’s Life in Rawlinson MS 505, and the vernacular version in Brussels MS 2324-40 are edited here for the first time.
comments: Contents: Preface; 1. Previous work on the Lives of St Ailbhe; 2. Contents of the Life; 3. Manuscripts, editions and character of the various recensions; 4. The Codex Samanticensis (S) version of the Latin Life; 5. The Rawlinson (R) version of Ailbhe's Life; 6. The Trinity College (T) and Marsh's Library (M) version of the Life; 7. The vernacular version of the Life; Commentary; Appendices.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, Four Tipperary saints: The lives of Colum of Terryglass, Crónán of Roscrea, Mochaomhóg of Leigh and Ruadhán of Lorrha, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2014.  
abstract:
When St Patrick was leaving Munster via the Little Brosna river, close to Tipperary’s northern boundary, he is said to have given a blessing to the province’s people, its men, women and children. Much of this blessing must have lingered over north Tipperary, because no fewer than four of its saints were made the subjects of written Lives, Ruadhán and Colum from the neighbouring parishes of Lorrha and Terryglass, Crónán of Roscrea, and Mochaomhóg of Leigh in Twomileborris. The Lives written for these saints in Latin, translated here for the first time into English, contain much that is of interest, not only to Tipperary people, but to all who wish to know more about the history of early Irish Christianity. Written many centuries after the golden age of the saints, these texts tell us a great deal about the fortunes of their churches, and about the aims and associations of the communities devoted to them. Pádraig Ó Riain, in this new translation, gives access to these four Lives to a brand new audience.
(source: Four Courts Press)
abstract:
When St Patrick was leaving Munster via the Little Brosna river, close to Tipperary’s northern boundary, he is said to have given a blessing to the province’s people, its men, women and children. Much of this blessing must have lingered over north Tipperary, because no fewer than four of its saints were made the subjects of written Lives, Ruadhán and Colum from the neighbouring parishes of Lorrha and Terryglass, Crónán of Roscrea, and Mochaomhóg of Leigh in Twomileborris. The Lives written for these saints in Latin, translated here for the first time into English, contain much that is of interest, not only to Tipperary people, but to all who wish to know more about the history of early Irish Christianity. Written many centuries after the golden age of the saints, these texts tell us a great deal about the fortunes of their churches, and about the aims and associations of the communities devoted to them. Pádraig Ó Riain, in this new translation, gives access to these four Lives to a brand new audience.
(source: Four Courts Press)
Ó Riain, Pádraig, A dictionary of Irish saints, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2011.  
Scarcely a parish in Ireland is without one or more dedications to saints, in the form of churches in ruins, holy wells or other ecclesiastical monuments. This book is a guide to the (mainly documentary) sources of information on the saints named in these dedications, for those who have an interest in them, scholarly or otherwise. The need for a summary biographical dictionary of Irish saints, containing information on such matters as feastdays, localisations, chronology, and genealogies, although stressed over sixty years ago by the eminent Jesuit and Bollandist scholar, Paul Grosjean, has never before been satisfied. Professor Ó Riain has been working in the field of Irish hagiography for upwards of forty years, and the material for the over 1,000 entries in his Dictionary has come from a variety of sources, including Lives of the saints, martyrologies, genealogies of the saints, shorter tracts on the saints (some of them accessible only in manuscripts), annals, annates, collections of folklore, Ordnance Survey letters, and other documents. Running to almost 700 pages, the body of the Dictionary is preceded by a preface, list of sources and introduction, and is followed by comprehensive indices of parishes, other places (mainly townlands), alternate (mainly anglicised) names, subjects, and feastdays.
Scarcely a parish in Ireland is without one or more dedications to saints, in the form of churches in ruins, holy wells or other ecclesiastical monuments. This book is a guide to the (mainly documentary) sources of information on the saints named in these dedications, for those who have an interest in them, scholarly or otherwise. The need for a summary biographical dictionary of Irish saints, containing information on such matters as feastdays, localisations, chronology, and genealogies, although stressed over sixty years ago by the eminent Jesuit and Bollandist scholar, Paul Grosjean, has never before been satisfied. Professor Ó Riain has been working in the field of Irish hagiography for upwards of forty years, and the material for the over 1,000 entries in his Dictionary has come from a variety of sources, including Lives of the saints, martyrologies, genealogies of the saints, shorter tracts on the saints (some of them accessible only in manuscripts), annals, annates, collections of folklore, Ordnance Survey letters, and other documents. Running to almost 700 pages, the body of the Dictionary is preceded by a preface, list of sources and introduction, and is followed by comprehensive indices of parishes, other places (mainly townlands), alternate (mainly anglicised) names, subjects, and feastdays.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, Diarmuid Ó Murchadha, and Kevin Murray (eds.), Historical dictionary of Gaelic placenames / Foclóir stairiúil áitainmneacha na Gaeilge [Fascicle 4 / Fascúl 4 (Ceall Ghabhann-Cláiríne)], fasc. 4, London: Irish Texts Society, 2011.
Ó Riain, Pádraig [ed.], A martyrology of four cities: Metz, Cologne, Dublin, Lund, Henry Bradshaw Society 118, London: Boydell Press, 2009.
Ó Riain, Pádraig [comp.], Lebor gabála Érenn: The book of the taking of Ireland, vol. 6: Index of names, Irish Texts Society 63, London: Irish Texts Society, 2009.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, Diarmuid Ó Murchadha, and Kevin Murray (eds.), Historical dictionary of Gaelic placenames / Foclóir stairiúil áitainmneacha na Gaeilge [Fascicle 3 / Fascúl 3 (C-Ceall Fhursa)], fasc. 3, London: Irish Texts Society, 2008.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, Feastdays of the saints: a history of Irish martyrologies, Subsidia hagiographica 86, Bruxelles: Société des Bollandists, 2006. 416 pp + xxvii.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, Diarmuid Ó Murchadha, and Kevin Murray (eds.), Historical dictionary of Gaelic placenames / Foclóir stairiúil áitainmneacha na Gaeilge [Fascicle 2 (names in B-) / Fascúl 2 (ainmneacha i B-)], fasc. 2, London: Irish Texts Society, 2005.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, Diarmuid Ó Murchadha, and Kevin Murray (eds.), Historical dictionary of Gaelic placenames / Foclóir stairiúil áitainmneacha na Gaeilge [Fascicle 1 (names in A-) / Fascúl 1 (ainmneacha in A-)], fasc. 1, London: Irish Texts Society, 2003.
Ó Riain, Pádraig [ed.], Four Irish martyrologies: Drummond, Turin, Cashel, York, Henry Bradshaw Society 115, London: Henry Bradshaw Society, 2002.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, The making of a saint: Finbarr of Cork, 600–1200, Irish Texts Society, Subsidiary Series 5, London: Irish Texts Society, 1997.
Ó Riain, Pádraig [ed.], Beatha Bharra: Saint Finnbarr of Cork: The complete Life, Irish Texts Society 57, London: Irish Texts Society, 1994.
Herbert, Máire, and Pádraig Ó Riain, Betha Adamnáin: The Irish life of Adamnán, Irish Texts Society 54, London: Irish Texts Society, 1988.
CELT – edition: <link>
O'Sullivan, Anne, and Pádraig Ó Riain (eds.), Poems on Marcher Lords: from a sixteenth-century Tipperary manuscript, Irish Texts Society 53, London: Irish Texts Society, 1987.
Ó Riain, Pádraig [ed.], Cath Almaine, Mediaeval and Modern Irish Series 25, Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1978.
CELT – edition: <link>
Ó Riain, Pádraig, Clár na lámhscríbhinní Gaeilge sa Bhreatain Bhig, Dublin: Cló Bhréanainn, 1968.

Works edited

Ó Riain, Pádraig [ed.], The poems of Blathmac son of Cú Brettan: reassessments, Irish Texts Society, Subsidiary Series 27, London: Irish Texts Society, 2015.
Murray, Kevin, and Pádraig Ó Riain (eds.), Edmund Hogan’s Onomasticon Goedelicum: reconsiderations, Irish Texts Society, Subsidiary Series 23, London: Irish Texts Society, 2011.
Ó Riain, Pádraig [ed.], Geoffrey Keating’s Foras feasa ar Éirinn: reassessments, Irish Texts Society, Subsidiary Series 19, London: Irish Texts Society, 2008.
Ó Riain, Pádraig (ed.), Beatha Aodha Ruaidh: The life of Red Hugh O’Donnell: historical and literary contexts, Irish Texts Society, Subsidiary Series 12, London: Irish Texts Society, 2002.  
abstract:
This work, written about 1616 by Lughaidh Ó Cléirigh, narrates the events of Aodh Ruadh's life, from his capture and imprisonment in Dublin Castle in 1587 to his death in Spain in 1602. It focuses particularly on the period of the 'Nine Years War', including the battle of Kinsale (1601), seeing in the latter the loss of 'the authority and sovereignty of the Gaels of Ireland to the end of time.' As such, it is one of the few native sources to have covered in detail the events that culminated in the battle of Kinsale. Combining the traditional modes of Gaelic narrative with the novel features of Renaissance biography, the real aim of this literary and political document, according to Mícheál Mac Craith, was to further the martial career of Aodh Ruadh's nephew.

Its editor, Paul Walsh, was one of the most productive Irish scholars of the early twentieth century. His edition of the Life of Aodh Ruadh was the subject of the Society's annual seminar, held in conjunction with the Departments of Irish at UCC in 2001. The proceedings of the seminar have since been edited by Pádraig Ó Riain in the Subsidiary Series (no. 12).
abstract:
This work, written about 1616 by Lughaidh Ó Cléirigh, narrates the events of Aodh Ruadh's life, from his capture and imprisonment in Dublin Castle in 1587 to his death in Spain in 1602. It focuses particularly on the period of the 'Nine Years War', including the battle of Kinsale (1601), seeing in the latter the loss of 'the authority and sovereignty of the Gaels of Ireland to the end of time.' As such, it is one of the few native sources to have covered in detail the events that culminated in the battle of Kinsale. Combining the traditional modes of Gaelic narrative with the novel features of Renaissance biography, the real aim of this literary and political document, according to Mícheál Mac Craith, was to further the martial career of Aodh Ruadh's nephew.

Its editor, Paul Walsh, was one of the most productive Irish scholars of the early twentieth century. His edition of the Life of Aodh Ruadh was the subject of the Society's annual seminar, held in conjunction with the Departments of Irish at UCC in 2001. The proceedings of the seminar have since been edited by Pádraig Ó Riain in the Subsidiary Series (no. 12).
Carey, John, Máire Herbert, and Pádraig Ó Riain (eds.), Studies in Irish hagiography: saints and scholars, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2001.
de Brún, Pádraig, Seán Ó Coileáin, and Pádraig Ó Riain (eds.), Folia Gadelica: essays presented by former students to R. A. Breatnach on the occasion of his retirement from the professorship of Irish language and literature at University College, Cork, Cork: Cork University Press, 1983.

Contributions to journals

Ó Riain, Pádraig, “The Book of Glendalough: a continuing investigation”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 56 (2008): 71–88.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, “Johann Kaspar Zeuß und Irland”, Keltische Forschungen 2 (2007): 95–103.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, “Rawlinson B 502 alias Lebar Glinne Dá Locha: a restatement of the case”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 51 (1999): 130–147.
Luyken, Reiner [original author], Patrizia de Bernardo Stempel, Rolf Ködderitzsch, Herbert Pilch, Pádraig Ó Riain, and Karl Horst Schmidt [commentary], “Philologie und ihre Instrumentalisierung”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 49–50 (1997): 1055–1067.  
comments: The original article was published in Die Zeit 30 (1996). It is here presented with a number of commentaries by Celtic scholars.
comments: The original article was published in Die Zeit 30 (1996). It is here presented with a number of commentaries by Celtic scholars.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, “When and why Cothraige was first equated with Patricius?”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 49–50 (1997): 698–711.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, “Manuscript catalogues”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 46 (1994): 272–277.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, “Saints in the catalogue of bishops of the lost ‘Register of Clogher’”, Clogher Record 14:2 (1992): 66–77.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, “The Tallaght martyrologies, redated”, Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies 20 (Winter, 1990): 21–38.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, “Sanctity and politics in Connacht c. 1100: the case of St Fursa”, Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies 17 (Summer, 1989): 1–14.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, “The Psalter of Cashel: a provisional list of contents”, Éigse 23 (1989): 107–130.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, “Les Vies de Saint Fursy: les sources irlandaises”, Revue du Nord 68 (1986): 405–413.
Nicholls, K. W., and Pádraig Ó Riain, “Obituary: Anne O’Sullivan”, Peritia 3 (1984): 597–598.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, “The medieval Welsh [Review of: Davies, Wendy, Wales in the early Middle Ages, Studies in the Early History of Britain, Leicester: Leicester University Press, 1982]”, Peritia 3 (1984): 567–569.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, “Samson alias San(c)tán”, Peritia 3 (1984): 320–323.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, “NLI G 2, f. 3 and the Book of Glendalough”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 39 (1982): 29–32.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, “Towards a methodology in early Irish hagiography”, Peritia 1 (1982): 146–159.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, “The Book of Glendalough or Rawlinson B 502”, Éigse 18 (1981): 161–176.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, “Traces of Lug in early Irish hagiographical tradition”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 36 (1977): 138–156.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, “The composition of the Irish section of the Calendar of saints”, Dinnseanchas 6 — 1975 (1974–1977): 77–92.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, “Battle-site and territorial extent in early Ireland”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 33 (1974): 67–80.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, “A study of the Irish legend of the wild man”, Éigse 14:3 (1972): 179–206.

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

Ó Riain, Pádraig, “Saint Cataldo of Taranto: the Irish element in the life of an Italian saint”, in: Carey, John, Kevin Murray, and Caitríona Ó Dochartaigh (eds), Sacred histories: a Festschrift for Máire Herbert, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2015. 355–363.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, “Irische Hagiographie des 7. Jahrhunderts: Wahrheit oder Dichtung”, in: Schnoor, Franziska, Karl Schmuki, Ernst Tremp, Peter Erhart, and Jakob Kuratli Hüeblin (eds), Gallus und seine Zeit. Leben, Wirken, Nachleben, Monasterium Sancti Galli 7, St. Gallen: Verlag am Klosterhof St. Gallen, 2015. 55–64.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, “A study of the Irish legend of the Wild Man”, in: Carey, John [ed.], Buile Suibhne: perspectives and reassessments, Irish Texts Society, Subsidiary Series 26, London: Irish Texts Society, 2014. 172–201.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, “The O’Donohue Lives of the Salamancan Codex: the earliest collection of Irish saints’ lives?”, in: Sheehan, Sarah, Joanne Findon, and Westley Follett (eds.), Gablánach in scélaigecht: Celtic studies in honour of Ann Dooley, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2013. 38–52.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, “Leagan próis den dán Bliadhain so, solus a dath, as Leabhar Leacáin”, in: Ó Baoill, Dónall, Donncha Ó hAodha, and Nollaig Ó Muraíle (eds), Saltair saíochta, sanasaíochta agus seanchais: A festschrift for Gearóid Mac Eoin, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2013. 384–394.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, “Albert Le Grand’s Life of Sané of Plouzané, alias Seanán of Scattery Island”, in: Cassard, Jean-Christophe, Pierre-Yves Lambert, and Bertrand Yeurc'h (eds), Mélanges offerts au professeur Bernard Merdrignac, Britannia Monastica 17, Landévennec, 2013. 97–106.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, “Longford priories and their manuscripts: All Saints and Abbeyderg”, in: Morris, Martin, and Fergus O'Ferrall (eds.), Longford history and society. Interdisciplinary essays on the history of an Irish county, Dublin: Geography Publications, 2010. 39–50.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, “Irland und Wales: ein hagiographischer Austausch”, in: Hemprich, Gisbert [ed.], Festgabe für Hildegard L. C. Tristram: überreicht von Studenten, Kollegen und Freunden des ehemaligen Faches Keltologie der Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg, Bonner Beiträge zur Keltologie 1, Berlin: Curach Bhán, 2009. 63–67.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, “Scottorum origines fabulosae: the Metz version of Lebor gabála Érenn”, in: Carey, John [ed.], Lebor gabála Érenn: textual history and pseudohistory, Irish Texts Society, Subsidiary Series 20, Dublin: Irish Texts Society, 2009. 33–47.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, “The calendar and martyrology of Christ Church Cathedral, Dublin”, in: Gillespie, Raymond, and Raymond Refaussé (eds.), The medieval manuscripts of Christ Church Cathedral, Dublin, Dublin: Four Courts, 2006. 33–59.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, “Dublin’s oldest book? A list of saints ‘made in Germany’”, in: Duffy, Seán [ed.], Medieval Dublin V: proceedings of the Friends of Medieval Dublin Symposium, 2003, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2004. 52–72.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, “Irish saints’ cults and ecclesiastical families”, in: Thacker, Alan, and Richard Sharpe (eds.), Local saints and local churches in the early medieval West, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002. 291–302.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, “The Catalogus praecipuorum sanctorum Hiberniae, sixty years on”, in: Smyth, Alfred P. [ed.], Seanchas. Studies in early and medieval Irish archaeology, history and literature in honour of Francis J. Byrne, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2000. 395–430.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, “Die Bibliothek des Verfassers des kommentierten Félire Óengusso”, in: Poppe, Erich, and Hildegard L. C. Tristram (eds.), Übersetzung, Adaptation und Akkulturation im insularen Mittelalter, Studien und Texte zur Keltologie 4, Münster: Nodus Publikationen, 1999. 87–104.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, “Codex Salmanticensis: a provenance inter Anglos or inter Hibernos?”, in: Barnard, Toby, Dáibhí Ó Cróinín, and Katharine Simms (eds.), ‘A miracle of learning’: studies in manuscripts and Irish learning. Essays in honour of William O’Sullivan, Aldershot: Ashgate, 1998. 91–100.
Pádraig Ó Riain, “Introduction”, in: John Colgan, Trias thaumaturga (1997).
Ó Riain, Pádraig, “Pagan example and Christian practice: a reconsideration”, in: Edel, Doris [ed.], Cultural identity and cultural integration. Ireland and Europe in the early Middle Ages, Blackrock: Four Courts Press, 1995. 144–156.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, “The Táin: a clue to its origins”, in: Mallory, James P., and Gerard Stockman (eds.), Ulidia: proceedings of the First International Conference on the Ulster Cycle of Tales, Belfast and Emain Macha, 8–12 April 1994, Belfast: December, 1994. 31–37.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, “‘To be named is to exist’: the instructive case of Achadh Bolg (Aghabulloge)”, in: O'Flanagan, Patrick, and Cornelius Buttimer (eds), Cork history and society: interdisciplinary essays on the history of an Irish county, The Irish County History & Society Series, Cork: Geography Publications, 1993. 45–61.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, “The saints and their amanuenses: early models and later issues”, in: Tranter, Stephen N., and Hildegard L. C. Tristram (eds.), Early Irish literature — media and communication / Mündlichkeit und Schriftlichkeit in der frühen irischen Literatur, ScriptOralia 10, Tübingen: Narr, 1989. 267–280.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, “Conservation in the vocabulary of the early Irish church”, in: Ó Corráin, Donnchadh, Liam Breatnach, and Kim R. McCone (eds.), Sages, saints and storytellers: Celtic studies in honour of Professor James Carney, Maynooth Monographs 2, Maynooth: An Sagart, 1989. 358–366.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, “St. Abbán: the genesis of an Irish saint’s life”, in: Evans, D. Ellis, John G. Griffith, and E. M. Jope (eds), Proceedings of the Seventh International Congress of Celtic studies, held at Oxford, from 10th to 15th July, 1983, Proceedings of the International Congress of Celtic Studies, Oxford: D. E. Evans, 1986. 159–170.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, “Cainnech alias Columcille, patron of Ossory”, in: de Brún, Pádraig, Seán Ó Coileáin, and Pádraig Ó Riain (eds.), Folia Gadelica: essays presented by former students to R. A. Breatnach on the occasion of his retirement from the professorship of Irish language and literature at University College, Cork, Cork: Cork University Press, 1983. 20–35.
Ó Riain, Pádraig, “The MacMahons: scribes of Ennistymon”, in: McNamara, Martin [ed.], Mount Saint Joseph, Ennistymon, 1824-1974, Ennistymon, Co. Clare: Leinster Leader, 1974.

As honouree

Carey, John, Máire Herbert, and Kevin Murray (eds.), Cín Chille Cúile: texts, saints and places. Essays in honour of Pádraig Ó Riain, Celtic Studies Publications 9, Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 2004.

As honouree

Carey, John, Máire Herbert, and Kevin Murray (eds.), Cín Chille Cúile: texts, saints and places. Essays in honour of Pádraig Ó Riain, Celtic Studies Publications 9, Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 2004.