Bibliography

Nicholas B. (Nicholas Boyter)
Aitchison
s. xx / s. xxi

4 publications between 1990 and 2019 indexed
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Theses

Aitchison, Nicholas B., “Monuments and the construction of the past in early historic Ireland”, PhD thesis: University of Glasgow, 1990.  
abstract:
This thesis concerns the manner in which the monumental remains of earlier human activity within the Irish landscape were perceived and investigated with meaning and value during the early historic period. This period is defined here as comprising the sixth to eleventh centuries AD. That some monuments were regarded as significant during the early historic period is indicated by the prominence which they are accorded in epic literature and topographical lore, their recording in annalistic compilations as the sites of battles and assemblies, and their spatial proximity to - or even incorporation within - ecclesiastical or royal sites.
(source: Glasgow Theses Service)
Glasgow Theses Service: <link>
abstract:
This thesis concerns the manner in which the monumental remains of earlier human activity within the Irish landscape were perceived and investigated with meaning and value during the early historic period. This period is defined here as comprising the sixth to eleventh centuries AD. That some monuments were regarded as significant during the early historic period is indicated by the prominence which they are accorded in epic literature and topographical lore, their recording in annalistic compilations as the sites of battles and assemblies, and their spatial proximity to - or even incorporation within - ecclesiastical or royal sites.
(source: Glasgow Theses Service)


Contributions to journals

Aitchison, Nick, “The Brude list: a panegyric to a Pictish king”, North American Journal of Celtic Studies 3:1 (2019): 18–46.  
abstract:

This paper sheds new light on an enigmatic text preserved within the Pictish regnal list. Traditionally known as ‘The 30 Brudes’, the Brude list is the longest surviving Pictish text and is usually interpreted as a regnal list, genealogical record, or list of Pictish territories. By contrast, analysis of its textual history, structure, and contents reveals that the Brude list is, instead, a panegyric, in the form of a catalogue poem in the Insular Celtic tradition, to a Pictish king named Brude, the Irish or Gaelic form of the Pictish personal name Bredei or Bridei, a name shared by several Pictish kings. The contents of the Brude list are compared with cognate terms in other Insular sources, its format reconstructed, an edited text proposed, and a provisional translation made. The mode and possible contexts of performance of the Brude list as a call and response chant poem are then inferred.

Journal volume:  – Issue 1: <link> – Issue 2: <link>
abstract:

This paper sheds new light on an enigmatic text preserved within the Pictish regnal list. Traditionally known as ‘The 30 Brudes’, the Brude list is the longest surviving Pictish text and is usually interpreted as a regnal list, genealogical record, or list of Pictish territories. By contrast, analysis of its textual history, structure, and contents reveals that the Brude list is, instead, a panegyric, in the form of a catalogue poem in the Insular Celtic tradition, to a Pictish king named Brude, the Irish or Gaelic form of the Pictish personal name Bredei or Bridei, a name shared by several Pictish kings. The contents of the Brude list are compared with cognate terms in other Insular sources, its format reconstructed, an edited text proposed, and a provisional translation made. The mode and possible contexts of performance of the Brude list as a call and response chant poem are then inferred.

Aitchison, Nicholas B., “Late Bronze Age ritual at Haughey’s Fort: the evidence of the deposited cup-and-ring marked stone”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 17 (1998): 31–39.
Aitchison, Nicholas B., “Votive deposition in Iron Age Ireland: an early medieval account”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 15 (1996): 67–75.