Bibliography

Michael I.
Allen

2 publications in 2014 indexed
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Works edited

Otten, Willemien, and Michael I. Allen (eds), Eriugena and Creation: proceedings of the Eleventh International Conference on Eriugenian Studies, held in honor of Edouard Jeauneau, Chicago, 9–12 November 2011, Turnhout: Brepols, 2014.  
abstract:
Unjustly ignored as a result of a thirteenth-century condemnation, the thought of Johannes Scottus Eriugena (ca. 810-877) has only been subject to critical study in the twentieth century. Now, with the completion of the critical edition of Eriugena’s masterwork - the Periphyseon - the time has come to explore what is arguably the most intriguing and vital theme in his work: creation and nature. In honor of Edouard Jeauneau - Institute Professor at the Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, University of Toronto and Honorary Research Director at the C.N.R.S. in Paris - to whom the field of Eriugenian studies is enormously indebted, this volume seeks to undertake a serious examination of the centrality of Eriugena’s thought within the Carolingian context, taking into account his Irish heritage, his absorption of Greek thought and his place in Carolingian culture; of Eriugena as a medieval thinker, both his intellectual influences and his impact on later medieval thinkers; and of Eriugena’s reception by modern philosophy, from considerations of philosophical idealism to technology.
comments: Includes a bibliography of Eriugenian Studies, 2000–2014
abstract:
Unjustly ignored as a result of a thirteenth-century condemnation, the thought of Johannes Scottus Eriugena (ca. 810-877) has only been subject to critical study in the twentieth century. Now, with the completion of the critical edition of Eriugena’s masterwork - the Periphyseon - the time has come to explore what is arguably the most intriguing and vital theme in his work: creation and nature. In honor of Edouard Jeauneau - Institute Professor at the Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, University of Toronto and Honorary Research Director at the C.N.R.S. in Paris - to whom the field of Eriugenian studies is enormously indebted, this volume seeks to undertake a serious examination of the centrality of Eriugena’s thought within the Carolingian context, taking into account his Irish heritage, his absorption of Greek thought and his place in Carolingian culture; of Eriugena as a medieval thinker, both his intellectual influences and his impact on later medieval thinkers; and of Eriugena’s reception by modern philosophy, from considerations of philosophical idealism to technology.
comments: Includes a bibliography of Eriugenian Studies, 2000–2014

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

Allen, Michael I., “Poems by Lupus, written by Heiric: an endpaper for Édouard Jeauneau (Paris, BnF, lat. 7496, fol. 249v)”, in: Otten, Willemien, and Michael I. Allen (eds), Eriugena and Creation: proceedings of the Eleventh International Conference on Eriugenian Studies, held in honor of Edouard Jeauneau, Chicago, 9–12 November 2011, Turnhout: Brepols, 2014. 105–135.  
abstract:
The paper presents a newly discovered sylloge of poems by Lupus of Ferrières, including his self-composed epitaph, which Heiric of Auxerre copied into his personally annotated manuscript of Priscian. The discussion relates these poems to others by Lupus. The status of Lupus’s famous autograph copy of Cicero’s De oratore, London, BL, Harley 2736, is conclusively affirmed via new textual evidence. Differentiating features of Lupus’s handwriting therein are presented, and compared and contrasted with Heiric’s hand as known from his autograph annals in Melk, Stiftsbibl. 412 ; the latter evidence guarantees the identity of the copier of the poems. Fuller and more exact details of Heiric’s early cursus and relationship with Lupus emerge from the new poems and a revised reading from the Melk ms. Heiric and Lupus shared time and space as master and pupil at Ferrières, where a school, writing room, and library certainly existed. The new poems are critically edited. Appendix 1 resolves the other content of the page where Heiric copied down the poems (with other texts in Tironian shorthand). Appendix 2 offers French translations of the new poems.
abstract:
The paper presents a newly discovered sylloge of poems by Lupus of Ferrières, including his self-composed epitaph, which Heiric of Auxerre copied into his personally annotated manuscript of Priscian. The discussion relates these poems to others by Lupus. The status of Lupus’s famous autograph copy of Cicero’s De oratore, London, BL, Harley 2736, is conclusively affirmed via new textual evidence. Differentiating features of Lupus’s handwriting therein are presented, and compared and contrasted with Heiric’s hand as known from his autograph annals in Melk, Stiftsbibl. 412 ; the latter evidence guarantees the identity of the copier of the poems. Fuller and more exact details of Heiric’s early cursus and relationship with Lupus emerge from the new poems and a revised reading from the Melk ms. Heiric and Lupus shared time and space as master and pupil at Ferrières, where a school, writing room, and library certainly existed. The new poems are critically edited. Appendix 1 resolves the other content of the page where Heiric copied down the poems (with other texts in Tironian shorthand). Appendix 2 offers French translations of the new poems.