Bibliography

Sharon
Arbuthnot
s. xx / s. xxi

19 publications between 2000 and 2018 indexed
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2018

article
Arbuthnot, Sharon J., “On some Irish words for birds and insects: revisiting the eDIL entries on gaillén and certán”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 76 (2018): 89–101.

2015

article
Arbuthnot, Sharon, “The phrase troig mná trogain in exhortative speech”, Studia Celtica Fennica 12 (2015): 5–20.  
abstract:
The phrase troig mná trogain appears in a number of Irish narrative texts from the medieval and Early Modern periods. It is clearly a reference to an undesirable experience. In light of this, there has been a tendency to interpret the phrase as meaning 'the pangs of a woman in childbirth'. Such an understanding does not seem justified, however, by the established semantic ranges of the words listed in DIL as trog, trogan or trogain. The purpose of this article is to reinstate Kuno Meyer’s century-old suggestion that the last element of this phrase is trogan 'raven' and to refine and build upon this, arguing that ben trogain is a kenning for the Morrígain in her bird-aspect and asking whether the first element of the phrase under discussion might be the word for 'foot'. Following this line of thought, it seems possible that the phrase in question is an allusion to that defining moment in medieval Irish literature when the Morrígain alights upon the dying Cú Chulainn, setting foot upon his spilt intestines.
Journal volume:  Studia Celtica Fennica: <link>
abstract:
The phrase troig mná trogain appears in a number of Irish narrative texts from the medieval and Early Modern periods. It is clearly a reference to an undesirable experience. In light of this, there has been a tendency to interpret the phrase as meaning 'the pangs of a woman in childbirth'. Such an understanding does not seem justified, however, by the established semantic ranges of the words listed in DIL as trog, trogan or trogain. The purpose of this article is to reinstate Kuno Meyer’s century-old suggestion that the last element of this phrase is trogan 'raven' and to refine and build upon this, arguing that ben trogain is a kenning for the Morrígain in her bird-aspect and asking whether the first element of the phrase under discussion might be the word for 'foot'. Following this line of thought, it seems possible that the phrase in question is an allusion to that defining moment in medieval Irish literature when the Morrígain alights upon the dying Cú Chulainn, setting foot upon his spilt intestines.

2013

article
Arbuthnot, Sharon J., “Only fools and horses: dá n-ó bill and dá n-ó pill in medieval Irish texts”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 65 (2013): 49–56.
article
Arbuthnot, Sharon, “Some suggested corrections and additions to DIL based on glossary material”, Studia Celtica 47 (2013): 59–68.

2012

article
Arbuthnot, Sharon J., “Finn, Ferchess and the rincne: versions compared”, in: Arbuthnot, Sharon J., and Geraldine Parsons (eds.), The Gaelic Finn tradition, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2012. 62–80.
article
Arbuthnot, Sharon J., and Geraldine Parsons, “Introduction”, in: Arbuthnot, Sharon J., and Geraldine Parsons (eds.), The Gaelic Finn tradition, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2012. 9–13.
edited work
Arbuthnot, Sharon J., and Geraldine Parsons (eds.), The Gaelic Finn tradition, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2012.

2010

article
Russell, Paul, Sharon Arbuthnot, and Pádraic Moran, Early Irish glossaries database, Online: Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic, University of Cambridge. URL: <http://www.asnc.cam.ac.uk/irishglossaries>.
article
Arbuthnot, Sharon, “Obscurities in Dúil Dromma Cetta: insights into a lost exemplar and form-oriented scribing”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 59 (Summer, 2010): 19–37.

2008

article
Arbuthnot, Sharon, “Glossary entries, DIL and the struggle with meaning: some case studies”, Studia Celtica 42 (2008): 117–134.

2007

work
Arbuthnot, Sharon, Cóir anmann: a late Middle Irish treatise on personal names, vol. 2: Part 2, Irish Texts Society 60, London: Irish Texts Society, 2007.
work
Arbuthnot, Sharon [ed. and tr.], Cóir anmann: a late Middle Irish treatise on personal names, 2 vols, Irish Texts Society 59–60, London: Irish Texts Society, 2005–2007.
edited work
Arbuthnot, Sharon, and Kaarina Hollo (eds), ‘Fil súil nglais: a grey eye looks back’: a festschrift in honour of Colm Ó Baoill, Ceann Drochaid, Perthshire: Clann Tuirc, 2007.

2006

article
Arbuthnot, Sharon J., “On the name Oscar and two little-known episodes involving the fían”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 51 (Summer, 2006): 67–81.
article
Arbuthnot, Sharon, “Medieval Irish compilation: conservation and creativity”, in: Claassens, Geert H. M., and Werner Verbeke (eds), Medieval manuscripts in transition: tradition and creative recycling, Mediaevalia Lovaniensia 36, Leuven: Leuven University Press, 2006. 1–12.
article
Arbuthnot, Sharon, “Some accretions to genealogical material in a manuscript boxed with the Book of Leinster”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 55 (2006): 57–67.

2005

work
Arbuthnot, Sharon, Cóir anmann: a late Middle Irish treatise on personal names, vol. 1: Part 1, Irish Texts Society 59, London: Irish Texts Society, 2005.  

Contents: Introduction (pp 1-75, in 7 chapters); Editorial method (76); Diplomatic texts [BB and NLI MS G 2] and translation (79ff); App. I. Concordances of entries (200ff); App. II. Genealogical tables (222ff); Bibliography (234ff); Index of personal names (242ff).

Contents: Introduction (pp 1-75, in 7 chapters); Editorial method (76); Diplomatic texts [BB and NLI MS G 2] and translation (79ff); App. I. Concordances of entries (200ff); App. II. Genealogical tables (222ff); Bibliography (234ff); Index of personal names (242ff).

2001

article
Arbuthnot, Sharon, “The manuscript tradition of Cóir anmann”, Studia Celtica 35 (2001): 285–298.

2000

article
Arbuthnot, Sharon J., “Fíthal in Cóir anmann”, Scottish Gaelic Studies 20 (2000): 197–200.