Bibliography

Matthieu
Boyd

9 publications between 2006 and 2018 indexed
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Works authored

Ó Cathasaigh, Tomás, Coire Sois: the cauldron of knowledge, ed. Matthieu Boyd, Notre Dame, Indiana: University of Notre Dame Press, 2014.

Works edited

Boyd, Matthieu (ed.), Ollam: studies in Gaelic and related traditions in honor of Tomás Ó Cathasaigh, Madison and Teaneck: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 2016.

Contributions to journals

Boyd, Matthieu, “[Review essay:] Gwerzioù for all! A look at the field”, North American Journal of Celtic Studies 2:2 (2018): 179–185.
Boyd, Matthieu, “The timeless tale of Bricriu's feast”, North American Journal of Celtic Studies 1:2 (November, 2017): 151–172. 
abstract:
The early Irish tale Fled Bricrenn ‘Bricriu's feast’ is set at an impossible time relative to the centerpiece of the Ulster Cycle, the epic Táin bó Cúailnge. Key characters, including Bricriu himself, are not available after the Táin, while the integral episodes involving Ailill and Medb would make no sense before the Táin. The embarrassing behavior of the heroes Lóegaire and Conall is also inconsistent with the way they are portrayed in other texts. Although there are limited parallels with other kinds of medieval literature, such as the verse tradition of French Arthurian romance, these problems are most helpfully addressed by recourse to contemporary Fan Fiction studies in conjunction with the medieval concept of glossing. Even if it does contain authentic lore, Bricriu's feast comes into focus as a comically distorted, but serious-minded reflection on the rest of the Ulster Cycle, including the Táin. The major themes of this reflection include the devaluation of fame through excess of praise, and the worthiness of the hero's community to benefit from him, even as the hero's own status depends on serving their interests and enacting their values.
abstract:
The early Irish tale Fled Bricrenn ‘Bricriu's feast’ is set at an impossible time relative to the centerpiece of the Ulster Cycle, the epic Táin bó Cúailnge. Key characters, including Bricriu himself, are not available after the Táin, while the integral episodes involving Ailill and Medb would make no sense before the Táin. The embarrassing behavior of the heroes Lóegaire and Conall is also inconsistent with the way they are portrayed in other texts. Although there are limited parallels with other kinds of medieval literature, such as the verse tradition of French Arthurian romance, these problems are most helpfully addressed by recourse to contemporary Fan Fiction studies in conjunction with the medieval concept of glossing. Even if it does contain authentic lore, Bricriu's feast comes into focus as a comically distorted, but serious-minded reflection on the rest of the Ulster Cycle, including the Táin. The major themes of this reflection include the devaluation of fame through excess of praise, and the worthiness of the hero's community to benefit from him, even as the hero's own status depends on serving their interests and enacting their values.
Boyd, Matthieu, “The importance of the formulaic language in the Gwerzhioù”, Ollodagos: actes de la Société Belge d'Études Celtiques 25:1 (2010): 111–163.
Boyd, Matthieu, “[Review of: Carey, John, Ireland and the Grail, Celtic Studies Publications 11, Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 2007]”, Celtic Studies Association of North America Newsletter 26:2 (2009): 3–6. http://www.csub.edu/~cmacquarrie/csana.
Boyd, Matthieu, “Melion and the wolves of Ireland”, Neophilologus 93 (2009): 555–570. 
abstract:
When the werewolf protagonist of the Old French lay of Melion recruits a band of other wolves in order to lay waste to Ireland, this activity—unique to Melion—is informed by the medieval Irish view of díberg ‘(wolf-like) brigandage’. These aspects of Melion’s setting and plot are major developments in the medieval werewolf tale most famously attested in Marie de France’s Bisclavret. The case of Melion has profound implications for understanding Celtic influence on Francophone literature in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries.
abstract:
When the werewolf protagonist of the Old French lay of Melion recruits a band of other wolves in order to lay waste to Ireland, this activity—unique to Melion—is informed by the medieval Irish view of díberg ‘(wolf-like) brigandage’. These aspects of Melion’s setting and plot are major developments in the medieval werewolf tale most famously attested in Marie de France’s Bisclavret. The case of Melion has profound implications for understanding Celtic influence on Francophone literature in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries.
Boyd, Matthieu, “Competing assumptions about the drúth in Orgain Denna Ríg”, Ériu 59 (2009): 37–47.