Bibliography

Andrew (Andrew Charles)
Breeze

45 publications between 1987 and 2013 indexed
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Works authored

Breeze, Andrew, The origins of the Four Branches of the Mabinogi, Leominster: Gracewing, 2009.
Coates, Richard, and Andrew Breeze, Celtic voices, English places. Studies of the Celtic impact on place-names in England, Stamford: Shaun Tyas, 2000.


Contributions to journals

Breeze, Andrew, “'Pen Ren Wleth' (BT 34.1) and Gourock, Scotland”, Studia Celtica 46 (2012): 191–194.
Breeze, Andrew, “Orosius, the Book of Taliesin and Culhwch and Olwen”, Studia Celtica 45 (2011): 203–209.
Breeze, Andrew, “Bede’s castella: homesteads or castles”, Quaestio Insularis 11 (2010): 209–214.
Breeze, Andrew, “The date and politics of ‘The song of the Welsh’”, The Antiquaries Journal 88 (September, 2008): 190–197.  
abstract:
The Latin war-poem ‘The Song of the Welsh’ poses problems of dating and origin, as also does the identity of a mysterious ‘Broinsius’ mentioned in it. Yet the last seems to be the fifth-century British hero Ambrosius Aurelianus; while the influence of bardic verse on the poem suggests it is not from thirteenth-century England, but from a Welsh school (perhaps located at St Davids) of similar date.
abstract:
The Latin war-poem ‘The Song of the Welsh’ poses problems of dating and origin, as also does the identity of a mysterious ‘Broinsius’ mentioned in it. Yet the last seems to be the fifth-century British hero Ambrosius Aurelianus; while the influence of bardic verse on the poem suggests it is not from thirteenth-century England, but from a Welsh school (perhaps located at St Davids) of similar date.
Breeze, Andrew, “Cruxes in ‘The saints and martyrs of Christendom’”, Studia Celtica 42 (2008): 149–153.
Breeze, Andrew, “Who was Siôn Cent’s Firain?”, Studia Celtica 42 (2008): 153–154.
Breeze, Andrew, “Ptolemy’s Cenio and the Fal Estuary, Cornwall”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 56 (2008): 116–118.
Breeze, Andrew, “The Old Cornish gloss on Boethius”, Notes and Queries 54:4 (2007): 367–368.
Breeze, Andrew, “Cornish toponyms: Crim Rocks, Darite, Perranuthnoe, Port Isaac, and Treverva”, Celtica 25 (2007): 1–8.
Breeze, Andrew, “Ptolemy’s Gangani and sacred geese.”, Studia Celtica 40 (2006): 43–50.
Breeze, Andrew, “Mael Suthain and a charter of King Eadwig”, Notes and Queries 53:1 (2006): 23–24.
Breeze, Andrew, “Celtic symptoms in De abbatibus and Altercatio magistri et discipuli”, The Journal of Medieval Latin 15 (2005): 148–152.
Breeze, Andrew, “Cyntefin ceinaf amser and Horace”, Studia Celtica 39 (2005): 193–199.
Breeze, Andrew, “Morville in Shropshire and Myfyr in Gwynedd”, Journal of Celtic Studies 4 (2004): 201–203.
Breeze, Andrew, “Portus Adurni and Portchester, Hampshire”, Studia Celtica 38 (2004): 180–184.
Breeze, Andrew, “Peredur son of Efrawg and windmills”, Celtica 24 (2003): 58–64.
Breeze, Andrew, “Morris Kyffin and Ovid’s Epistulae ex Ponto”, Studia Celtica 36 (2002): 153–155.
Breeze, Andrew, “Is Ravenna’s Lavobrinta the River Severn?”, Studia Celtica 36 (2002): 152–153.
Breeze, Andrew, “Seventh-century Northumbria and a poem to Cadwallon”, Northern History 38 (2001): 145–152.
Breeze, Andrew, and William Tobin, “The great comet of 1744 and a poem by Alexander MacDonald on the pretender”, Éigse 32 (2000): 135–137.
Breeze, Andrew, “The Blessed Virgin and the sunbeam through glass”, Celtica 23 (1999): 19–29.
Breeze, Andrew, “Old English lærig ‘shield rim’ in Exodus and Maldon: Welsh lloring in Culhwch and Olwen”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 51 (1999): 170–172.
Breeze, Andrew, “Common Gaelic básaire ‘executioner’: Middle Scots basare ‘executioner’”, Scottish Gaelic Studies 18 (1998): 186–187.
Breeze, Andrew, “Armes Prydein, Hywel Dda, and the reign of Edmund of Wessex”, Études Celtiques 33 (1997): 209–222.  
abstract:
[FR] Armes Prydein, Hywel Dda, et le règne d’Edmond de Wessex.
Deux textes témoignent de relations entre Edmond de Wessex (939-46) et Hywel le Bon (f 950), de Dyfed : ce sont le poème politique Armes Prydein «La prophétie de Grande-Bretagne» et une note annalistique pour 945 recueillie par le chroniqueur du XIIIe siècle. Roger de Wendover. On montre que des allusions jusque ici obscures, dans le poème, se rapportent à la capitulation d’Edmond devant les Vikings, à Leicester, au début de 940. Cela prouverait que Armes Prydein a été écrit à la fin de 940, et que ce texte appelait à attaquer les Anglais en 941. La note annalistique pour 945 évoque l’aide apportée par un roi inconnu, «Leolin», à l’attaque menée par Edmond contre le Strathclyde. «Leolin» ne peut s’expliquer que par la déformation du nom de Hywel, qui a dû donner à Edmond de solides renforts militaires dans son expédition au Nord de la Grande-Bretagne. L’examen de ces problèmes difficiles introduit un éclairage nouveau sur les relations anglo-galloises au début du Xe siècle.

[EN] Two texts provide evidence for relations between Edmund of Wessex (939)46) and Hywel the Good (d. 950) of Dyfed. They are the political poem Armes Prydein ‘The Prophecy of Britain’and an annal for 945 preserved by the thirteenth-century chronicler Roger of Wendover. Hitherto obscure references in the poem can be shown to refer to Edmund’s capitulation to the Vikings at Leicester in early 940. It can thus be proved that Armes Prydein was written in late 940, and that it called for an attach on the English in 941. The annal for 945 refers to the help given by an obscure king ‘Leolin’ in Edmund’s attack on Strathclyde. ‘Leolin’can be explained only as a corruption of the name of Hywel, who must have given Edmund strong military support in this attack on North Britain. The solution of these cruxes thus breaks new ground on Anglo-Welsh relations in the early tenth century.
Journal volume:  Persée – Études Celtiques, vol. 33, 1997: <link>
abstract:
[FR] Armes Prydein, Hywel Dda, et le règne d’Edmond de Wessex.
Deux textes témoignent de relations entre Edmond de Wessex (939-46) et Hywel le Bon (f 950), de Dyfed : ce sont le poème politique Armes Prydein «La prophétie de Grande-Bretagne» et une note annalistique pour 945 recueillie par le chroniqueur du XIIIe siècle. Roger de Wendover. On montre que des allusions jusque ici obscures, dans le poème, se rapportent à la capitulation d’Edmond devant les Vikings, à Leicester, au début de 940. Cela prouverait que Armes Prydein a été écrit à la fin de 940, et que ce texte appelait à attaquer les Anglais en 941. La note annalistique pour 945 évoque l’aide apportée par un roi inconnu, «Leolin», à l’attaque menée par Edmond contre le Strathclyde. «Leolin» ne peut s’expliquer que par la déformation du nom de Hywel, qui a dû donner à Edmond de solides renforts militaires dans son expédition au Nord de la Grande-Bretagne. L’examen de ces problèmes difficiles introduit un éclairage nouveau sur les relations anglo-galloises au début du Xe siècle.

[EN] Two texts provide evidence for relations between Edmund of Wessex (939)46) and Hywel the Good (d. 950) of Dyfed. They are the political poem Armes Prydein ‘The Prophecy of Britain’and an annal for 945 preserved by the thirteenth-century chronicler Roger of Wendover. Hitherto obscure references in the poem can be shown to refer to Edmund’s capitulation to the Vikings at Leicester in early 940. It can thus be proved that Armes Prydein was written in late 940, and that it called for an attach on the English in 941. The annal for 945 refers to the help given by an obscure king ‘Leolin’ in Edmund’s attack on Strathclyde. ‘Leolin’can be explained only as a corruption of the name of Hywel, who must have given Edmund strong military support in this attack on North Britain. The solution of these cruxes thus breaks new ground on Anglo-Welsh relations in the early tenth century.
Breeze, Andrew, “Two Irish Jesuits: Andrew Sall (1612–86) and Andrew Sall (1624–82)”, Éigse 29 (1996): 175–178.
Breeze, Andrew, “Irish Beltaine ‘May Day’ and Beltancu, a cattle rent in pre-Norman Lancashire”, Éigse 29 (1996): 59–63.
Breeze, Andrew, “Ieuan ap Rhydderch and Welsh rhagman ‘game of chance’”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 48 (1996): 29–33.
Breeze, Andrew, “Middle English daisser and Irish deisréad ‘sprinkler’”, Éigse 29 (1996): 150–152.
Breeze, Andrew, “Slab ‘mud’, an Irish ghostword: English slob ‘untidy person’”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 47 (1995): 87–88.
Breeze, Andrew, “Irish brat ‘cloak, cloth’: English brat ‘child’”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 47 (1995): 89–92.
Breeze, Andrew, “Iolo Goch and the islands of the ocean”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 46 (1994): 213–215.
Breeze, Andrew, “Celtic etymologies for Middle English brag ‘boast’, gird ‘strike’ and lethe ‘soften’”, Journal of Celtic Linguistics 3 (May, 1994): 135–148.
Breeze, Andrew, “Cain’s jawbone, Ireland, and the Prose Solomon and Saturn”, Notes and Queries 39 (1992): 433–436.
Breeze, Andrew, “The Blessed Virgin’s joys and sorrows”, Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies 19 (Summer, 1990): 41–54.
Breeze, Andrew, “The Virgin Mary, daughter of her son”, Études Celtiques 27 (1990): 267–283.  
abstract:
[FR] Andrew Breeze, La Vierge Marie fille de son fils
Le thème patristique de Marie mère et fille du Sauveur peut être retrouvé en Irlande (dans des hymnes hiberno-latins et irlandais), au Pays de Galles (dans de nombreux poèmes médiévaux) et en Angleterre.

[EN] The theme of Mary, mother and daughter of the Saviour, can be traced from the Eastern Fathers to Ireland (in Hiberno-latin and Irish hymns), to Wales (in numerous Medieval poems) and to England.
Journal volume:  Persée – Études Celtiques, vol. 27, 1990: <link>
abstract:
[FR] Andrew Breeze, La Vierge Marie fille de son fils
Le thème patristique de Marie mère et fille du Sauveur peut être retrouvé en Irlande (dans des hymnes hiberno-latins et irlandais), au Pays de Galles (dans de nombreux poèmes médiévaux) et en Angleterre.

[EN] The theme of Mary, mother and daughter of the Saviour, can be traced from the Eastern Fathers to Ireland (in Hiberno-latin and Irish hymns), to Wales (in numerous Medieval poems) and to England.
Breeze, Andrew, “The three sorrowful tidings”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 43 (1989): 141–150.
Breeze, Andrew, “The shrine of St Brigit at Olite, Spain”, Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies 16 (Winter, 1988): 85–95.
Breeze, Andrew, “The Virgin’s tears of blood”, Celtica 20 (1988): 110–122.
Breeze, Andrew, “The Blessed Virgin and the sunbeam through glass”, Barcelona English Language and Literature Studies 1 (1988): 53–64.
Breeze, Andrew, “The dance of death”, Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies 13 (Summer, 1987): 87–96.

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

Breeze, Andrew, “The Four branches of the Mabinogi and Hywel ap Owain Gwynedd (d. 1170)”, in: Ó Baoill, Dónall, Donncha Ó hAodha, and Nollaig Ó Muraíle (eds), Saltair saíochta, sanasaíochta agus seanchais: A festschrift for Gearóid Mac Eoin, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2013. 17–24.
Breeze, Andrew, “Spurs, horse-armour, and the date of Owein”, in: Hambro, Cathinka, and Lars Ivar Widerøe (eds), Lochlann: Festskrift til Jan Erik Rekdal på 60-årsdagen / Aistí in ómós do Jan Erik Rekdal ar a 60ú lá breithe, Oslo: Hermes Academic, 2013. 105–110.
Breeze, Andrew, “Seven types of Celtic loanword”, in: Filppula, Markku, Juhani Klemola, and Heli Pitkänen (eds.), The Celtic roots of English, Studies in Languages 37, Joensuu: University of Joensuu, 2002. 175–182.