Bibliography

George
Broderick
s. xx / s. xxi

26 publications between 1981 and 2020 indexed
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Works authored

Broderick, George, A handbook of late spoken Manx, 3 vols, Buchreihe der Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 3–4–5, Tübingen: Niemeyer, 1984–1986.  
Three volumes:
  • I. Grammar and texts
  • II. Dictionary
  • III. Phonology
Three volumes:
  • I. Grammar and texts
  • II. Dictionary
  • III. Phonology


Contributions to journals

Broderick, George, “Two Manx conversations (1948 and 1952)”, Journal of Celtic Linguistics 21 (2020): 75–142.  
abstract:
This article contains editions and translations of two recordings of conversations between native Manx speakers from 1948 and 1952 respectively, with detailed linguistic discussion.
abstract:
This article contains editions and translations of two recordings of conversations between native Manx speakers from 1948 and 1952 respectively, with detailed linguistic discussion.
Broderick, George, “Manx traditional songs, rhymes and chants in the repertoire of the last native Manx speakers”, Studia Celtica Fennica 16 (2019): 5–70.  
abstract:

In the course of taking down/sound-recording material from the last native Manx speakers between 1883 and 1972 a number of lyrical texts formed part of some of the collections. A number of such texts have already appeared in print, others appear here for the first time. This article seeks to bring all such known texts together under one roof in order to serve the interests of various fields of study concerned with traditional lyric-text material.

abstract:

In the course of taking down/sound-recording material from the last native Manx speakers between 1883 and 1972 a number of lyrical texts formed part of some of the collections. A number of such texts have already appeared in print, others appear here for the first time. This article seeks to bring all such known texts together under one roof in order to serve the interests of various fields of study concerned with traditional lyric-text material.

Broderick, George, “Prof. Sir John Rhŷs in the Isle of Man (1886–1893): dictionary”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 66 (2019): 15–74.  
abstract:
Zwischen den Jahren 1886-1893 besuchte Prof. John Rhŷs die Insel Man, ursprünglich um neuentdeckte Ogam-Inschriften zu inspizieren, welche ihn zufälligerweise in die Endphase des gesprochenen Manx-Gälischen führten. Zu der Zeit lebte noch eine große Anzahl Muttersprachler des Manx-Gälischen, und 1888 fing er mit seinen Recherchen ernsthaft an. Von 107 mutmaßlichen Informanten konnte er 88 besuchen und ihnen Sprachmaterialien jeder Art (Folklore, Kurztexte, Liederfragmente usw.) entlocken. Die Krönung seiner Arbeit besteht aus der großen Anzahl von Wörtern und Redewendungen des Spät-Manx-Gälischen, welche im Format eines Wörterbuches unten wiedergegeben wird.
abstract:
Zwischen den Jahren 1886-1893 besuchte Prof. John Rhŷs die Insel Man, ursprünglich um neuentdeckte Ogam-Inschriften zu inspizieren, welche ihn zufälligerweise in die Endphase des gesprochenen Manx-Gälischen führten. Zu der Zeit lebte noch eine große Anzahl Muttersprachler des Manx-Gälischen, und 1888 fing er mit seinen Recherchen ernsthaft an. Von 107 mutmaßlichen Informanten konnte er 88 besuchen und ihnen Sprachmaterialien jeder Art (Folklore, Kurztexte, Liederfragmente usw.) entlocken. Die Krönung seiner Arbeit besteht aus der großen Anzahl von Wörtern und Redewendungen des Spät-Manx-Gälischen, welche im Format eines Wörterbuches unten wiedergegeben wird.
Broderick, George, “Francis J. Carmody: the Manx recordings”, Studia Celtica 52 (2018): 157–178.  
abstract:
During July 1949 Francis J. Carmody (1907–82), Professor of French in the University of Calfornia at Berkeley, visited the Isle of Man and obtained Manx Gaelic material from six of the remaining native Manx speakers. In looking through Carmody's material it is clear that in a number of places he has proposed either an inaccurate translation for the text in hand or has not fully understood what was said to him by the speaker concerned. Whilst Wagner (July 1950) and Jackson (Christmas / New Year 1950–1) organised their material to reflect Late Manx syntax and phonology respectively, Carmody concentrates on its morphology, organising sentences to elicit the particular aspect of the morphology sought. In spite of some shortcomings, given that Carmody's is the only body of material, though small, which looks at Late Manx morphology, I still consider it worthwhile to make Carmody's material once more available and to bring his transcriptions up to date with current IPA script and integrate them into the main corpus of recorded Manx speech, thereby bringing them into line with those of Rhŷs and Marstrander, Wagner and Jackson, as well as that of the sound-recorded material, thus completing the collection. From the same people, as well as two non-native speakers, he made some four hours of tape recordings, believed to be housed in the above university.
abstract:
During July 1949 Francis J. Carmody (1907–82), Professor of French in the University of Calfornia at Berkeley, visited the Isle of Man and obtained Manx Gaelic material from six of the remaining native Manx speakers. In looking through Carmody's material it is clear that in a number of places he has proposed either an inaccurate translation for the text in hand or has not fully understood what was said to him by the speaker concerned. Whilst Wagner (July 1950) and Jackson (Christmas / New Year 1950–1) organised their material to reflect Late Manx syntax and phonology respectively, Carmody concentrates on its morphology, organising sentences to elicit the particular aspect of the morphology sought. In spite of some shortcomings, given that Carmody's is the only body of material, though small, which looks at Late Manx morphology, I still consider it worthwhile to make Carmody's material once more available and to bring his transcriptions up to date with current IPA script and integrate them into the main corpus of recorded Manx speech, thereby bringing them into line with those of Rhŷs and Marstrander, Wagner and Jackson, as well as that of the sound-recorded material, thus completing the collection. From the same people, as well as two non-native speakers, he made some four hours of tape recordings, believed to be housed in the above university.
Broderick, George, “Fin as Oshin – A reappraisal”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 65 (2018): 63–82.
Broderick, George, “Manx traditional songs and song-fragments in the end-phase of Manx Gaelic: from the Clague music collection (1890s)”, Studia Celtica Fennica 15 (2018): 28–64.  
abstract:
During the 1890s three collections of Manx traditional music and song were made at a time when similar collections were being made elsewhere, particularly in Britain and Ireland. In the Isle of Man the collections were made by 1) medical practitioner Dr. John Clague (1842-1908) of Castletown (also a colleague of Prof. John Rhŷs (1840-1915) during his visits to Man (1886-93), by 2) the Gill Brothers (W. H. and J. F. Gill), and 3) Manx aristocrat A. W. Moore (1853-1909). The first two (Clague and Gill) mainly collected traditional tunes, Moore mainly song- texts. However, a number of song-texts (usually the first stanza only) find place in Clague’s music collection. Although some of the texts were dealt with by Anne G. Gilchrist in her edition of the Clague Collection printed in the Journal of the Folk Song Society VII, 28-30 (1924-26), the main emphasis lay on a comparison of their texts with similar versions of a given song in other traditions (i.e. Ireland, Scotland, England and a few in Wales, some even further afield). In this article all the known texts in Clague’s music collection are dealt with particularly with regard to their linguistic content and treatment, espcially in the context of the obsolescence taking place in spoken Manx of the period. In this latter regard we do see some of the effects of obsolescence on the recorded pronunciation of the Manx texts in the songs. In the Appendix we look at the remnants of the May-time song (in its Manx form) ‘Huggey my fainey sourey lhien’, a Manx version of the traditional Irish ‘Thugamar féin an samhradh linn’; the Manx version showing some antiquity in its form.
Journal volume:  Studia Celtica Fennica: <link>
abstract:
During the 1890s three collections of Manx traditional music and song were made at a time when similar collections were being made elsewhere, particularly in Britain and Ireland. In the Isle of Man the collections were made by 1) medical practitioner Dr. John Clague (1842-1908) of Castletown (also a colleague of Prof. John Rhŷs (1840-1915) during his visits to Man (1886-93), by 2) the Gill Brothers (W. H. and J. F. Gill), and 3) Manx aristocrat A. W. Moore (1853-1909). The first two (Clague and Gill) mainly collected traditional tunes, Moore mainly song- texts. However, a number of song-texts (usually the first stanza only) find place in Clague’s music collection. Although some of the texts were dealt with by Anne G. Gilchrist in her edition of the Clague Collection printed in the Journal of the Folk Song Society VII, 28-30 (1924-26), the main emphasis lay on a comparison of their texts with similar versions of a given song in other traditions (i.e. Ireland, Scotland, England and a few in Wales, some even further afield). In this article all the known texts in Clague’s music collection are dealt with particularly with regard to their linguistic content and treatment, espcially in the context of the obsolescence taking place in spoken Manx of the period. In this latter regard we do see some of the effects of obsolescence on the recorded pronunciation of the Manx texts in the songs. In the Appendix we look at the remnants of the May-time song (in its Manx form) ‘Huggey my fainey sourey lhien’, a Manx version of the traditional Irish ‘Thugamar féin an samhradh linn’; the Manx version showing some antiquity in its form.
Broderick, George, “The Manx verbal noun revisited”, Journal of Celtic Linguistics 18 (2017): 117–125.  
abstract:
This note looks at the thesis proposed by Christopher Lewin that the verbal noun in Manx over time became 'verbalised' or a 'true verb'. My note looks at three aspects of Lewin's thesis: (a) the verbal noun itself, (b) nominal prepositions and (c) the attachment of * ag to verbal-nouns with vocalic anlaut; and I suggest that all three are connected in the context of the onset of syncretism in Manx Gaelic and thereby reach a different conclusion.
abstract:
This note looks at the thesis proposed by Christopher Lewin that the verbal noun in Manx over time became 'verbalised' or a 'true verb'. My note looks at three aspects of Lewin's thesis: (a) the verbal noun itself, (b) nominal prepositions and (c) the attachment of * ag to verbal-nouns with vocalic anlaut; and I suggest that all three are connected in the context of the onset of syncretism in Manx Gaelic and thereby reach a different conclusion.
Broderick, George, “The last native Manx Gaelic speakers. The final phase: ‘full’ or ‘terminal’ in speech?”, Studia Celtica Fennica 14 (2017): 18–57.
Journal volume:  Studia Celtica Fennica: <link>
Broderick, George, “Latin and Celtic: the substantive verb”, Glotta: Zeitschrift für griechische und lateinische Sprache 91 (2015): 3–14.
Broderick, George, “The continuation, survival and obsolescence of Gaulish speech in the Roman Empire”, Keltische Forschungen 6 (2013–2014): 7–58.  
abstract:

Dieser Aufsatz beschäftigt sich mit dem Weiterleben und dem Ausklang des Gallischen als Alltagssprache in Gallien bzw. des Galatischen in Kleinasien im Römischen Reich anhand von einschlägigen lateinischen bzw. griechischen Texten von ca. 50 bis 1200 n. Chr. und verwendet dabei ein modernes Sprachmodell des Sprachtodes als Maßstab, welches uns vielleicht ermöglicht, einen terminus post quem zum Ausklang des Gallischen bzw. des Galatischen zu finden.

This article seeks to assess the continuation, survival and obsolescence of Gaulish as a community language in Gaul (and Galatian in Asia Minor) during the period of the Roman Empire, looking at the evidence of relevant Latin and Greek texts dating from ca. 50–1200 CE, as well as making use of a present-day model of language death as a guide, in order that we may arrive at a likely time-span as to when Gaulish (and Galatian) became obsolescent.

abstract:

Dieser Aufsatz beschäftigt sich mit dem Weiterleben und dem Ausklang des Gallischen als Alltagssprache in Gallien bzw. des Galatischen in Kleinasien im Römischen Reich anhand von einschlägigen lateinischen bzw. griechischen Texten von ca. 50 bis 1200 n. Chr. und verwendet dabei ein modernes Sprachmodell des Sprachtodes als Maßstab, welches uns vielleicht ermöglicht, einen terminus post quem zum Ausklang des Gallischen bzw. des Galatischen zu finden.

This article seeks to assess the continuation, survival and obsolescence of Gaulish as a community language in Gaul (and Galatian in Asia Minor) during the period of the Roman Empire, looking at the evidence of relevant Latin and Greek texts dating from ca. 50–1200 CE, as well as making use of a present-day model of language death as a guide, in order that we may arrive at a likely time-span as to when Gaulish (and Galatian) became obsolescent.

Broderick, George, “Neologisms in Revived Manx in the Isle of Man”, Studia Celtica Fennica 10 (2013): 7–29.  
abstract:
During its life Goidelic in the Isle of Man has taken on board external vocabulary and terms from a variety of sources (e.g. Latin, Old Norse, Anglo-Norman & Romance, and English) to fulfil various requirements of the time. When Goidelic (later known as Manx in Man) was becoming obsolescent and was subject to revival activity, additional accretions, usually in the form of neologisms, from various sources were taken into the language, again to fulfil the requirements of the time. This article looks at such accretions, particularly during the revival period (ca. 1930s to present), and examines their provenances and entry into Manx.
Journal volume:  – PDFs: <link>
abstract:
During its life Goidelic in the Isle of Man has taken on board external vocabulary and terms from a variety of sources (e.g. Latin, Old Norse, Anglo-Norman & Romance, and English) to fulfil various requirements of the time. When Goidelic (later known as Manx in Man) was becoming obsolescent and was subject to revival activity, additional accretions, usually in the form of neologisms, from various sources were taken into the language, again to fulfil the requirements of the time. This article looks at such accretions, particularly during the revival period (ca. 1930s to present), and examines their provenances and entry into Manx.
Broderick, George, “Tynwald: a Manx cult-site and institution of pre-Scandinavian origin?”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 46 (Winter, 2003): 55–94.
Broderick, George, “A handbook of Late Spoken Manx: index of Gaelic words”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 42 (1987): 293–310.
Broderick, George, “Ec ny Fiddleryn”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 40 (1984): 211–227.
Broderick, George, “Ny kirree fo niaghtey”, Celtica 16 (1984): 157–168.
Broderick, George, “Berrey Dhone: a Manx Caillech Bérri?”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 40 (1984): 193–210.
Broderick, George, “Manx stories and reminiscences of Ned Beg Hom Ruy [Translation and notes]”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 39 (1982): 117–194.
Broderick, George, “Manx stories and reminiscences of Ned Beg Hom Ruy”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 38 (1981): 113–178.

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

Broderick, George, “Prof. Sir John Rhŷs in the Isle of Man (1886–1893): linguistic material and texts”, in: Karl, Raimund, and Katharina Möller (eds), Proceedings of the second European Symposium in Celtic Studies: held at Prifysgol Bangor University from July 31st to August 3rd 2017, Hagen/Westfalen: curach bhán, 2018. 35–70.
Broderick, George, “Indo-European and non Indo-European aspects to the languages and place-names in Britain and Ireland: an overview”, in: Hambro, Cathinka, and Lars Ivar Widerøe (eds), Lochlann: Festskrift til Jan Erik Rekdal på 60-årsdagen / Aistí in ómós do Jan Erik Rekdal ar a 60ú lá breithe, Oslo: Hermes Academic, 2013. 282–314.
Broderick, George, “Kelten und Nicht-Kelten in Britannien und Irland: eine demographische und sprachwissenschaftliche Untersuchung anhand u. a. ptolemäischer Orts- und Stammesnamen”, in: Stüber, Karin, Thomas Zehnder, and Dieter Bachmann (eds), Akten des 5. Deutschsprachigen Keltologensymposiums, Zürich, 7. - 10. September 2009, Keltische Forschungen. Allgemeine Buchreihe 1, Vienna: Praesens, 2010. 17–32.
Broderick, George, “Manx”, in: Ball, Martin J., and Nicole Müller (eds.), The Celtic languages, Routledge Language Family Descriptions, 2nd ed. (1993), London, New York: Routledge, 2009. 305–356.
George, Ken, and George Broderick, “The revived languages – Cornish and Manx”, in: Ball, Martin J., and Nicole Müller (eds.), The Celtic languages, Routledge Language Family Descriptions, 2nd ed. (1993), London, New York: Routledge, 2009. 753–769.
Broderick, George, “Vorskandinavische Ortsnamen auf der Insel Man”, in: Birkhan, Helmut [ed.], Kelten-Einfälle an der Donau. Akten des Vierten Symposiums deutschsprachiger Keltologinnen und Keltologen ... Linz/Donau, 17.-21. Juli 2005, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Philosophisch-Historische Klasse, Denkschriften 345, Vienna: Verlag der Österreichischen Akademie der Wissenschaften, 2007. 67–82.
Broderick, George, “Sprachkontakt und Sprachgeschichte der Insel Man im Rahmen ihrer Ortsnamen”, in: Rockel, Martin, and Stefan Zimmer (eds), Akten des ersten Symposiums Deutschsprachiger Keltologen (Gosen bei Berlin, 8.–10. April 1992), Buchreihe der Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 11, Tübingen: Niemeyer, 1993. 57–66.