Bibliography

Dauvit
Broun
s. xx / s. xxi

17 publications between 1995 and 2015 indexed
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Works authored

Broun, Dauvit, Scottish independence and the idea of Britain: from the Picts to Alexander III, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2007.
Broun, Dauvit, The Irish identity of the kingdom of the Scots in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, Studies in Celtic History 18, Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 1999.
Broun, Dauvit, The charters of Gaelic Scotland and Ireland in the early and central Middle Ages, Quiggin Pamphlets on the Sources of Mediaeval Gaelic History2, Cambridge: Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic, University of Cambridge, 1995. iv + 52 pp.

Websites

Broun, Dauvit [princip. invest.], Matthew Hammond, Roibeard Ó Maolalaigh, John Bradley, and David Carpenter, The paradox of medieval Scotland 1093–1286: social relationships and identities before the Wars of Independence, Online: King's College, London; University of Edinburgh; University of Glasgow. URL: <https://paradox.poms.ac.uk>. 
abstract:

The period between 1093 and 1286 laid the foundations for modern Scotland. At its start, the king of Scots ruled no more than a small east coast realm between Lothian and Moray. At its end, his authority extended over the whole area of modern Scotland apart from the Northern Isles. During the same period, Scotland's society and culture was transformed by the king implanting a new nobility of Anglo-Norman origin and establishing English influenced structures of law and government. Rees Davies observed of Scotland that 'paradoxically, the most extensively English-settled and Anglicised part of the British Isles was the country which retained its political independence' (The First English Empire, 170). The paradox could go deeper. Is it a coincidence that it was only in the thirteenth century, when Anglicisation became dominant in the lowlands, that the kingdom of the Scots ceased to be regarded by its inhabitants as a realm of many regions and began to be thought of as a single country and people? In one sense the kingdom was becoming more self-consciously Scottish; and yet its history in this period is typically seen in terms of native distinctiveness being eroded by the influx of English immigration, social institutions and culture. But, should this be seen primarily in British terms? How does this transformation relate to wider patterns of social and cultural homogenisation that have been identified in this period, embracing French-speaking elites, Flemish as well as English traders, and the religious life and institutions of Latin Christendom?

This project was funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council from 2007 until 2010 and combining members of the Universities of Glasgow, Edinburgh and King's College London to investigate how a recognisably modern Scottish identity was formed during the period 1093-1286. Drawing on over 6000 contemporary charters, it constructed a unique data-base which provided biographical information about all known people in Scotland between 1093 and 1286. This has now been updated to 1314 as part of the Breaking of Britain project. This enlarged database is freely available to all on the 'Database' tab above.

abstract:

The period between 1093 and 1286 laid the foundations for modern Scotland. At its start, the king of Scots ruled no more than a small east coast realm between Lothian and Moray. At its end, his authority extended over the whole area of modern Scotland apart from the Northern Isles. During the same period, Scotland's society and culture was transformed by the king implanting a new nobility of Anglo-Norman origin and establishing English influenced structures of law and government. Rees Davies observed of Scotland that 'paradoxically, the most extensively English-settled and Anglicised part of the British Isles was the country which retained its political independence' (The First English Empire, 170). The paradox could go deeper. Is it a coincidence that it was only in the thirteenth century, when Anglicisation became dominant in the lowlands, that the kingdom of the Scots ceased to be regarded by its inhabitants as a realm of many regions and began to be thought of as a single country and people? In one sense the kingdom was becoming more self-consciously Scottish; and yet its history in this period is typically seen in terms of native distinctiveness being eroded by the influx of English immigration, social institutions and culture. But, should this be seen primarily in British terms? How does this transformation relate to wider patterns of social and cultural homogenisation that have been identified in this period, embracing French-speaking elites, Flemish as well as English traders, and the religious life and institutions of Latin Christendom?

This project was funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council from 2007 until 2010 and combining members of the Universities of Glasgow, Edinburgh and King's College London to investigate how a recognisably modern Scottish identity was formed during the period 1093-1286. Drawing on over 6000 contemporary charters, it constructed a unique data-base which provided biographical information about all known people in Scotland between 1093 and 1286. This has now been updated to 1314 as part of the Breaking of Britain project. This enlarged database is freely available to all on the 'Database' tab above.

Works edited

Broun, Dauvit, and Martin MacGregor (eds.), Mìorun mór nan Gall, ‘The great ill-will of the Lowlander’? Lowland perceptions of the Highlands, medieval and modern, Glasgow: University of Glasgow, 2009.

Contributions to journals

Broun, Dauvit, “Statehood and lordship in ‘Scotland’ before the mid-twelfth century”, Innes Review 66:1 (May, 2015): 1–71.  
abstract:
Discussions of medieval statehood are guided (explicitly or implicitly) by the work of social scientists. The exiguous sources for studying Scotland in the central middle ages offers an opportunity to approach the question of statehood in a new way that depends more on the creative potential of arts and humanities. Social sciences remain crucial for understanding statehood. Instead of being guided by them during the research, however, the medieval material can itself become the basis for a dialogue with formulations of statehood by social scientists, or by historians drawing on social science. The focus is on ‘Scotland’ (the country between the Forth and the Spey), examining the basis of secular authority in local lordship, and how this underpinned the mobilisation of society for the sake of safeguarding its peace and security. This includes a consideration of the power of lordly kindreds, the lands assigned to the offices of mormaer and king, and the changing relationship of lords to individual settlements, and how this could underlie the transition from pett to baile in place names c.1100. As a result, a fresh view is taken on the antecedents of earldoms and the nature of shires, and on the role of the mormaer.
(source: Publisher)
abstract:
Discussions of medieval statehood are guided (explicitly or implicitly) by the work of social scientists. The exiguous sources for studying Scotland in the central middle ages offers an opportunity to approach the question of statehood in a new way that depends more on the creative potential of arts and humanities. Social sciences remain crucial for understanding statehood. Instead of being guided by them during the research, however, the medieval material can itself become the basis for a dialogue with formulations of statehood by social scientists, or by historians drawing on social science. The focus is on ‘Scotland’ (the country between the Forth and the Spey), examining the basis of secular authority in local lordship, and how this underpinned the mobilisation of society for the sake of safeguarding its peace and security. This includes a consideration of the power of lordly kindreds, the lands assigned to the offices of mormaer and king, and the changing relationship of lords to individual settlements, and how this could underlie the transition from pett to baile in place names c.1100. As a result, a fresh view is taken on the antecedents of earldoms and the nature of shires, and on the role of the mormaer.
(source: Publisher)
Broun, Dauvit, “The changing face of charter scholarship: a review article”, The Innes Review 52:2 (2001): 205–211.
Broun, Dauvit, “A third manuscript of the Life of St Serf”, The Innes Review 50:1 (Spring, 1999): 80–82.

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

Broun, Dauvit, “Cethri prímchenéla Dáil Ríata revisited.”, in: Carey, John, Kevin Murray, and Caitríona Ó Dochartaigh (eds), Sacred histories: a Festschrift for Máire Herbert, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2015. 63–72.
Broun, Dauvit, “Re-examining cáin in Scotland in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries”, in: Duffy, Seán [ed.], Princes, prelates and poets in medieval Ireland: essays in honour of Katharine Simms, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2013. 46–62.
Broun, Dauvit, Thomas Owen Clancy, and Katherine Forsyth, “The property records: text and translation”, in: Forsythe, Katherine (ed.), Studies on the Book of Deer, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2008. 131–144.
Broun, Dauvit, “The property records in the Book of Deer as a source for early Scottish society”, in: Forsythe, Katherine (ed.), Studies on the Book of Deer, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2008. 313–360.
Broun, Dauvit, “Becoming Scottish in the thirteenth century: the evidence of the Chronicle of Melrose”, in: Smith, Beverley Ballin, Simon Taylor, and Gareth Williams (eds), West over sea: studies in Scandinavian sea-borne expansion and settlement before 1300: a Festschrift in honour of Dr. Barbara E. Crawford, The Northern World31, Leiden: Brill, 2007. 19–32.
Broun, Dauvit, “The adoption of brieves in Scotland”, in: Flanagan, Marie Therese, and Judith A. Green (eds.), Charters and charter scholarship in Britain and Ireland, Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2005. 164–183.
Broun, Dauvit, “The church of St Andrews and its foundation legend in the early twelfth century: recovering the full text of version A of the foundation legend”, in: Taylor, Simon (ed.), Kings, clerics and chronicles in Scotland, 500–1297: essays in honour of Marjorie Ogilvie Anderson on the occasion of her ninetieth birthday, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2000. 108–114.
Broun, Dauvit, “Anglo-French acculturation and the Irish element in Scottish identity”, in: Smith, Brendan [ed.], Britain and Ireland 900–1300: Insular responses to medieval European change, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999. 135–153.
Broun, Dauvit, “Gaelic literacy in eastern Scotland between 1124 and 1249”, in: Pryce, Huw [ed.], Literacy in medieval Celtic societies, Cambridge Studies in Medieval Literature33, Cambridge, New York, Melbourne: Cambridge University Press, 1998. 183–201.