Bibliography

John
Carey

124 publications between 1981 and 2019 indexed
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Works authored

Carey, John, Magic, metallurgy and imagination in medieval Ireland: three studies, Celtic Studies Publications 21, Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 2019. 
Ch 1: Magical texts in early medieval Ireland; Ch. 2: The spells of blacksmiths, and other matters; Ch. 3: The three qualifications of a blacksmith.
Ch 1: Magical texts in early medieval Ireland; Ch. 2: The spells of blacksmiths, and other matters; Ch. 3: The three qualifications of a blacksmith.
Carey, John, The ever-new tongue: In tenga bithnúa. The text in the Book of Lismore, Apocryphes (APOCR) 15, Turnhout: Brepols, 2018. 
abstract:
The Ever-new Tongue is a medieval Irish account of the mysteries of the universe, remarkable for its exotic sources and for the rich exuberance of its style. This translation, based on the definitive edition of the text, renders this remarkable work available to a wider readership. The Ever-new Tongue (In Tenga Bithnúa), composed in Ireland in the ninth or tenth century, purports to reveal the mysteries of the creation, of the cosmos, and of the end of the world, as related by the soul of the apostle Philip speaking in the language of the angels. Drawing on a multitude of sources, both mainstream and heterodox, it reflects the richness of early Irish learning as well as the vitality of its author’s imagination.

The present volume is based on the full critical edition of The Ever-new Tongue, including detailed linguistic analysis and textual notes, which appeared in 2009 in the Corpus Christianorum, Series Apocryphorum (CCSA 16). The aim here is to offer to a broader readership a translation of the oldest (and most conservative) version of the text, preserved in the Book of Lismore, together with such other parts, fully updated, of the larger study as may be of interest to non-Celticists.

Table of contents:
Abbreviations; Bibliography; Introduction; I. Recensions and manuscripts; II. Synopsis; III. Background and sources; IV. Theology; ‘The ever-new tongue’ (Translation); Appendix: Dating the text; Glossary.
abstract:
The Ever-new Tongue is a medieval Irish account of the mysteries of the universe, remarkable for its exotic sources and for the rich exuberance of its style. This translation, based on the definitive edition of the text, renders this remarkable work available to a wider readership. The Ever-new Tongue (In Tenga Bithnúa), composed in Ireland in the ninth or tenth century, purports to reveal the mysteries of the creation, of the cosmos, and of the end of the world, as related by the soul of the apostle Philip speaking in the language of the angels. Drawing on a multitude of sources, both mainstream and heterodox, it reflects the richness of early Irish learning as well as the vitality of its author’s imagination.

The present volume is based on the full critical edition of The Ever-new Tongue, including detailed linguistic analysis and textual notes, which appeared in 2009 in the Corpus Christianorum, Series Apocryphorum (CCSA 16). The aim here is to offer to a broader readership a translation of the oldest (and most conservative) version of the text, preserved in the Book of Lismore, together with such other parts, fully updated, of the larger study as may be of interest to non-Celticists.

Table of contents:
Abbreviations; Bibliography; Introduction; I. Recensions and manuscripts; II. Synopsis; III. Background and sources; IV. Theology; ‘The ever-new tongue’ (Translation); Appendix: Dating the text; Glossary.
Carey, John, The Mythological Cycle of medieval Irish literature, Cork Studies in Celtic Literatures 3, Cork: Cork University Press, 2018. 
abstract:
A striking feature of medieval Irish literature is the prominence accorded to beings who are sometimes called the 'Túatha Dé' (Tribes of the Gods), and sometimes the people of the 'síde' or hollow hills: a magical race, in whom it is possible to recognise the divinities once worshipped by the pre-Christian Irish. Tales in which the 'Túatha Dé' have a central rôle have conventionally been assigned by scholars to a "mythological cycle". This book examines the background and rationale for this classification; discusses the nature of the 'Túatha Dé' themselves; and offers a survey of the tales of the 'Túatha Dé' that are attested from the Old Irish, Middle Irish and Early Modern Irish periods.
abstract:
A striking feature of medieval Irish literature is the prominence accorded to beings who are sometimes called the 'Túatha Dé' (Tribes of the Gods), and sometimes the people of the 'síde' or hollow hills: a magical race, in whom it is possible to recognise the divinities once worshipped by the pre-Christian Irish. Tales in which the 'Túatha Dé' have a central rôle have conventionally been assigned by scholars to a "mythological cycle". This book examines the background and rationale for this classification; discusses the nature of the 'Túatha Dé' themselves; and offers a survey of the tales of the 'Túatha Dé' that are attested from the Old Irish, Middle Irish and Early Modern Irish periods.
Carey, John [ed. and tr.], Apocrypha Hiberniae 2, Apocalyptica 1. In tenga bithnua: The ever-new tongue, Corpus Christianorum Series Apocryphorum 16, Turnhout: Brepols, 2010. 
Edition, with translation and introduction, of the Book of Lismore version of In tenga bithnua and another recension found in four manuscripts.
abstract:
The present publication presents the edition of an Irish treatise on the universe, composed in the ninth or tenth century. This work, which purportedly records a revelation of the mysteries of the cosmos uttered in angelic language by the soul of the apostle Philip, is characterized by the vividness of its imagery and the rich diversity of its content. Besides providing the most conservative version of the text, preserved in the Book of Lismore, the book supplies on facing pages a full critical edition of the second recension, found in four further manuscripts. Both versions are accompanied by translation. An introduction traces the text’s transmission from the time of its composition down to the final flowering of the Irish scribal tradition in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries; undertakes to identify its sources in earlier apocalyptic and cosmological literature; and subjects it to an in-depth linguistic analysis in order to place the question of its date in a clearer light. Individual aspects of the work’s content are discussed in an extended commentary, while matters of specifically philological interest are covered in a section of textual notes.
(source: Brepols)
Edition, with translation and introduction, of the Book of Lismore version of In tenga bithnua and another recension found in four manuscripts.
abstract:
The present publication presents the edition of an Irish treatise on the universe, composed in the ninth or tenth century. This work, which purportedly records a revelation of the mysteries of the cosmos uttered in angelic language by the soul of the apostle Philip, is characterized by the vividness of its imagery and the rich diversity of its content. Besides providing the most conservative version of the text, preserved in the Book of Lismore, the book supplies on facing pages a full critical edition of the second recension, found in four further manuscripts. Both versions are accompanied by translation. An introduction traces the text’s transmission from the time of its composition down to the final flowering of the Irish scribal tradition in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries; undertakes to identify its sources in earlier apocalyptic and cosmological literature; and subjects it to an in-depth linguistic analysis in order to place the question of its date in a clearer light. Individual aspects of the work’s content are discussed in an extended commentary, while matters of specifically philological interest are covered in a section of textual notes.
(source: Brepols)
Carey, John, Ireland and the Grail, Celtic Studies Publications 11, Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 2007.
Koch, John T., and John Carey (eds.), The Celtic Heroic Age. Literary sources for ancient Celtic Europe and early Ireland & Wales, Celtic Studies Publications 1, 4th ed. (1995), Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 2003.
Carey, John, A single ray of the sun: religious speculation in early Ireland, Celtic Studies Publications 3, Andover, MA, and Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 1999.
Carey, John, A new introduction to Lebor gabála Érenn: The book of the taking of Ireland, edited and translated by R. A. Stewart Macalister, D.Litt., Irish Texts Society, Subsidiary Series 1, London: Irish Texts Society, 1993.
Carey, John P., “Lebar Gabála, Recension I”, unpublished PhD dissertation: Harvard University, 1983.

Works edited

Carey, John [ed.], The matter of Britain in medieval Ireland: reassessments, Irish Texts Society, Subsidiary Series 29, London: Irish Texts Society, 2017. 
abstract:
The proceedings of the eighteenth annual seminar of the Irish Texts Society held in conjunction with the Combined Departments of Irish at University College Cork in November 2016.
abstract:
The proceedings of the eighteenth annual seminar of the Irish Texts Society held in conjunction with the Combined Departments of Irish at University College Cork in November 2016.
Carey, John, Kevin Murray, and Caitríona Ó Dochartaigh (eds), Sacred histories: a Festschrift for Máire Herbert, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2015.
Carey, John [ed.], Buile Suibhne: perspectives and reassessments, Irish Texts Society, Subsidiary Series 26, London: Irish Texts Society, 2014.
Carey, John, Emma Nic Cárthaigh, and Caitríona Ó Dochartaigh (eds), The end and beyond: medieval Irish eschatology, 2 vols, Celtic Studies Publications 17, Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 2014.
Carey, John, Emma Nic Cárthaigh, and Caitríona Ó Dochartaigh (eds), The end and beyond: medieval Irish eschatology, vol. 1, Celtic Studies Publications 17.1, Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 2014.
Carey, John, Emma Nic Cárthaigh, and Caitríona Ó Dochartaigh (eds), The end and beyond: medieval Irish eschatology, vol. 2, Celtic Studies Publications 17.2, Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 2014.
Carey, John, Máire Herbert, and James Knowles (eds), Travelled tales — Leabhar Scealach Siulach: The Book of Lismore at University College Cork, Cork: Cork University Press, 2011.
Carey, John, Máire Herbert, and Kevin Murray (eds.), Cín Chille Cúile: texts, saints and places. Essays in honour of Pádraig Ó Riain, Celtic Studies Publications 9, Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 2004.
Carey, John [ed.], Duanaire Finn: reassessments, Irish Texts Society, Subsidiary Series 13, London: Irish Texts Society, 2003.
McNamara, Martin, Caoimhín Breatnach, John Carey, Jean-Daniel Kaestli, Brian Ó Cuív, Pádraig Ó Fiannachta, and Diarmuid Ó Laoghaire (eds), Apocrypha Hiberniae, part I: Evangelia infantiae, 2 vols, Corpus Christianorum, Series Apocryphorum 13-14, Turnhout: Brepols, 2001.
Carey, John, Máire Herbert, and Pádraig Ó Riain (eds.), Studies in Irish hagiography: saints and scholars, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2001.
Carey, John, John T. Koch, and Pierre-Yves Lambert (eds.), Ildánach Ildírech. A festschrift for Proinsias Mac Cana, Celtic Studies Publications 4, Andover and Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 1999.

Contributions to journals

Carey, John, “Druids and Buddhists in Ogygia”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 66 (2013): 79–85.
Carey, John, “[Review of: O'Donoghue, Neil Xavier, The Eucharist in pre-Norman Ireland, Notre Dame, Indiana: University of Notre Dame Press, 2011]”, The American Historical Review 117:4 (2012): 117.
Carey, John, “Drie maal negen”, tr. Desirée Goverts, Kelten: Mededelingen van de Stichting A. G. van Hamel voor Keltische Studies 50 — thema ‘Getallen’ (May, 2011): 11–12.
Carey, John, “The three sails, the twelve winds, and the question of early Irish colour theory”, Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 72 (2009): 221–232.
Carey, John, “From David to Labraid: sacral kingship and the emergence of monotheism in Israel and Ireland”, in: Ritari, Katja, and Alexandra Bergholm (eds.), Approaches to religion and mythology in Celtic studies, Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars, 2008. 2–27.
Carey, John, “In tenga bithnua and the days of Creation”, Apocrypha: International Journal of Apocryphal Literatures 18 (2007): 231–246. 
abstract:
The medieval Irish cosmological treatise In tengua bithnua, a work evidently based on a lost apocalypse, is structured as an exposition of the six days of creation. Source analysis indicates that this structure is a secondary feature of the text, and that the creatures and natural phenomena arranged within it reflect the intellectual culture of the British Isles in the seventh and eighth centuries.
abstract:
The medieval Irish cosmological treatise In tengua bithnua, a work evidently based on a lost apocalypse, is structured as an exposition of the six days of creation. Source analysis indicates that this structure is a secondary feature of the text, and that the creatures and natural phenomena arranged within it reflect the intellectual culture of the British Isles in the seventh and eighth centuries.
Carey, John, “An Old Irish poem about Mug Ruith”, Journal of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society 110 (2005): 113–134.
Carey, John, “[Review of: Stalmans, Nathalie, Saints d'Irlande. Analyse critique des sources hagiographiques (VIIe-IXe siècle), Rennes: Presses Universitaires de Rennes, 2003]”, Speculum 80:3 (2005): 983–985.
Carey, John, “Two notes on names”, Éigse 35 (2005): 116–124.
Carey, John, “The obscurantists and the sea-monster: reflections on the Hisperica famina”, Peritia 17–18 (2003–2004): 40–60.
Carey, John, “The wanderings of Idris”, Studia Celtica 38 (2004): 151–156.
Carey, John, “The encounter at the ford: warriors, water and women”, Éigse 34 (2004): 10–24.
Carey, John, “Werewolves in medieval Ireland”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 44 (Winter, 2002): 37–72.
Carey, John, “The Lough Foyle colloquy texts: Immacaldam Choluim Chille ⁊ ind óclaig oc Carraic Eolairg and Immacaldam in druad Brain ⁊ inna baṅfátho Febuil ós Loch Fhebuil”, Ériu 52 (2002): 53–87. 
abstract:
This paper presents new editions, accompanied by translations and textual notes, of two texts associated with the legendary origin of Lough Foyle. These have usually been discussed in terms of their possible relationship with the tale Immram Brain, and it has been argued that both once formed part of the lost compilation Cín Dromma Snechtai. James Carney has suggested that they date from the seventh century; although they are evidently Old Irish, I can find no clear indications that either was written earlier than the eighth century.
abstract:
This paper presents new editions, accompanied by translations and textual notes, of two texts associated with the legendary origin of Lough Foyle. These have usually been discussed in terms of their possible relationship with the tale Immram Brain, and it has been argued that both once formed part of the lost compilation Cín Dromma Snechtai. James Carney has suggested that they date from the seventh century; although they are evidently Old Irish, I can find no clear indications that either was written earlier than the eighth century.
Carey, John, “Recent work on Celtic Christianity”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 42 (Winter, 2001): 83–88.
Carey, John, “Varia II: The address to Fergus's stone”, Ériu 51 (2000): 183–187.
Carey, John, “Transmutations and immortality in the lament of the old woman of Beare”, Celtica 23 — Essays in honour of James Patrick Carney (1999): 30–37.
Celtica: <link>
Carey, John, “Sages, saints, and semiotics: encountering medieval Irish literature”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 35 (Summer, 1998): 57–72.
Carey, John, “The three things required of a poet”, Ériu 48 (1997): 41–58.
Carey, John, “Obscure styles in medieval Ireland”, Mediaevalia 19 (1996): 23–29.
Carey, John, “On the interrelationships of some Cín Dromma Snechtai texts”, Ériu 46 (1995): 71–92.
Celtic Digital Initiative: <link>
Carey, John, “The rhetoric of Echtrae Chonlai”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 30 (Winter, 1995): 41–65.
Carey, John [ed.], “An edition of the pseudo-historical prologue to the Senchas Már”, Ériu 45 (1994): 1–32.
Carey, John, “Aerial ships and underwater monasteries: the evolution of a monastic marvel”, Proceedings of the Harvard Celtic Colloquium 12 (1992): 16–28.
Carey, John, “The testimony of the dead”, Éigse 26 (1992): 1–12.
Carey, John, “The waters of vision and the gods of skill”, Alexandria 1 (1991): 163–185.
Carey, John, “The two laws in Dubthach’s judgment”, Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies 19 (1990): 1–18.
Carey, John, “Myth and mythography in Cath Maige Tuired”, Studia Celtica 24–25 (1989–1990): 53–69.
Carey, John, “The ancestry of Fénius Farsaid”, Celtica 21 (1990): 104–112.
Celtica – PDF: <link>
Carey, John, “Vernacular Irish learning: three notes [1. nathair imchenn; 2. compóit mérda; 3. brisiud cend for mac fri clocha]”, Éigse 24 (1990): 37–44.
Carey, John, “Otherworlds and verbal worlds in Middle Irish narrative”, Proceedings of the Harvard Celtic Colloquium 9 (1990): 31–42.
Carey, John, “Sequence and causation in Echtra Nerai”, Ériu 39 (1988): 67–74.
Carey, John, “Fir Bolg: a native etymology revisited”, Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies 16 (Winter, 1988): 77–83.
Carey, John, “Three notes”, Celtica 20 (1988): 123–129.
Carey, John, “The origin and development of the Cesair legend”, Éigse 22 (1987): 37–48.
Carey, John, “Angelology in Saltair na rann”, Celtica 19 (1987): 2–8.
Celtic Digital Initiative: <link>
Carey, John, “Questions of interpolation in the opening cantos of Saltair na rann”, Proceedings of the Harvard Celtic Colloquium 6 (1986): 69–82.
Carey, John, “A tract on the Creation”, Éigse 21 (1986): 1–9.
Carey, John, “The Heavenly City in Saltair na rann”, Celtica 18 (1986): 87–104.
Carey, John, “Scél Tuáin meic Chairill”, Ériu 35 (1984): 93–111.
Celtic Digital Initiative – PDF: <link>
Carey, John, “Nodons in Britain and Ireland”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 40 (1984): 1–22.
Carey, John, “Notes on the Irish war-goddess”, Éigse 19:2 (1983): 263–275.
Carey, John, “The location of the Otherworld in the Irish tradition”, Éigse 19:1 (1982-1983): 36–43.
Carey, John, “Irish parallels to the myth of Odin’s eye”, Folklore 94:2 (1983): 214–218.
Carey, John, “The name Tuatha Dé Danann”, Éigse 18:2 (1981): 291–294.

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

Carey, John, “Learning, imagination and belief”, in: Smith, Brendan [ed.], The Cambridge history of Ireland, vol. 1: 600-1550, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018. 47–75.
Carey, John, “The Grail and Ireland”, in: Carey, John [ed.], The matter of Britain in medieval Ireland: reassessments, Irish Texts Society, Subsidiary Series 29, London: Irish Texts Society, 2017. 29–46.
Carey, John, “H and his world”, in: Ó hUiginn, Ruairí [ed.], Lebor na hUidre, Dublin: Royal Irish Academy, 2015. 101–113.
Carey, John, “Three cétnada”, in: Oudaer, Guillaume, Gaël Hily, and Herve Le Bihan (eds), Mélanges en l’honneur de Pierre-Yves Lambert, Rennes: TIR, 2015. 219–235.
Carey, John, “The old gods of Ireland in the later middle ages”, in: Ritari, Katja, and Alexandra Bergholm (eds), Understanding Celtic religion: revisiting the pagan past, New Approaches to Celtic Religion and Mythology, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2015. 51–68.
Carey, John, “In search of Mael Muru Othna”, in: Purcell, Emer, Paul MacCotter, Julianne Nyhan, and John Sheehan (eds), Clerics, kings and vikings: essays on medieval Ireland in honour of Donnchadh Ó Corráin, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2015. 429–439.
Carey, John, “Yonec and Tochmarc Becfhola: two female echtrai”, in: Carey, John, Kevin Murray, and Caitríona Ó Dochartaigh (eds), Sacred histories: a Festschrift for Máire Herbert, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2015. 73–85.
Carey, John, “The seven hells”, in: Carey, John, Emma Nic Cárthaigh, and Caitríona Ó Dochartaigh (eds), The end and beyond: medieval Irish eschatology, vol. 1, Celtic Studies Publications 17.1, Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 2014. 495–499.
Carey, John, “Acallam na senórach: a conversation between worlds”, in: Doyle, Aidan, and Kevin Murray (eds), In dialogue with the Agallamh: essays in honour of Seán Ó Coileáin, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2014. 76–89.
Carey, John, “The Seven Heavens in Fís Adomnáin”, in: Carey, John, Emma Nic Cárthaigh, and Caitríona Ó Dochartaigh (eds), The end and beyond: medieval Irish eschatology, vol. 1, Celtic Studies Publications 17.1, Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 2014. 197–200.
Carey, John, “The dialogue of the body and the soul”, in: Carey, John, Emma Nic Cárthaigh, and Caitríona Ó Dochartaigh (eds), The end and beyond: medieval Irish eschatology, vol. 1, Celtic Studies Publications 17.1, Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 2014. 47–65.
Carey, John, “Colum Cille on the pains of hell”, in: Carey, John, Emma Nic Cárthaigh, and Caitríona Ó Dochartaigh (eds), The end and beyond: medieval Irish eschatology, vol. 1, Celtic Studies Publications 17.1, Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 2014. 461–464.
Carey, John, “Saint Brendan on the fear of death”, in: Carey, John, Emma Nic Cárthaigh, and Caitríona Ó Dochartaigh (eds), The end and beyond: medieval Irish eschatology, vol. 1, Celtic Studies Publications 17.1, Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 2014. 445–451.
Carey, John, “The out-of-body adventures of Cairpre Cromm”, in: Carey, John, Emma Nic Cárthaigh, and Caitríona Ó Dochartaigh (eds), The end and beyond: medieval Irish eschatology, vol. 1, Celtic Studies Publications 17.1, Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 2014. 145–151.
Carey, John, “The story of Cairpre Cromm and Mael Ṡechnaill son of Mael Ruanaid”, in: Carey, John, Emma Nic Cárthaigh, and Caitríona Ó Dochartaigh (eds), The end and beyond: medieval Irish eschatology, vol. 1, Celtic Studies Publications 17.1, Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 2014. 465–473.
Carey, John, “A soul freed from hell by prayer”, in: Carey, John, Emma Nic Cárthaigh, and Caitríona Ó Dochartaigh (eds), The end and beyond: medieval Irish eschatology, vol. 1, Celtic Studies Publications 17.1, Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 2014. 453–459.
Carey, John, “The Seven Heavens: introduction”, in: Carey, John, Emma Nic Cárthaigh, and Caitríona Ó Dochartaigh (eds), The end and beyond: medieval Irish eschatology, vol. 1, Celtic Studies Publications 17.1, Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 2014. 155–170.
Carey, John, “Two poems on Saint Patrick’s Purgatory”, in: Carey, John, Emma Nic Cárthaigh, and Caitríona Ó Dochartaigh (eds), The end and beyond: medieval Irish eschatology, vol. 1, Celtic Studies Publications 17.1, Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 2014. 501–525.
Carey, John, “The two clerical students and the next life”, in: Carey, John, Emma Nic Cárthaigh, and Caitríona Ó Dochartaigh (eds), The end and beyond: medieval Irish eschatology, vol. 1, Celtic Studies Publications 17.1, Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 2014. 139–143.
Carey, John, “The nature of miracles in early Irish saints’ lives”, in: Siewers, Alfred Kentigern [ed.], Re-imagining nature: environmental humanities and ecosemiotics, Lewisburg, PA: Bucknell University Press, 2014. 127–139.
Carey, John, “The Vision of Laisrén”, in: Carey, John, Emma Nic Cárthaigh, and Caitríona Ó Dochartaigh (eds), The end and beyond: medieval Irish eschatology, vol. 1, Celtic Studies Publications 17.1, Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 2014. 417–444.
Carey, John, “The Reichenau Seven Heavens homily”, in: Carey, John, Emma Nic Cárthaigh, and Caitríona Ó Dochartaigh (eds), The end and beyond: medieval Irish eschatology, vol. 1, Celtic Studies Publications 17.1, Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 2014. 189–195.
Carey, John, “Soul and body: introduction”, in: Carey, John, Emma Nic Cárthaigh, and Caitríona Ó Dochartaigh (eds), The end and beyond: medieval Irish eschatology, vol. 1, Celtic Studies Publications 17.1, Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 2014. 43–46.
Carey, John, “The sea and the spirit: two notes”, in: Sheehan, Sarah, Joanne Findon, and Westley Follett (eds.), Gablánach in scélaigecht: Celtic studies in honour of Ann Dooley, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2013. 26–37.
Carey, John, “Compilations of lore and legend: Leabhar na hUidhre and the Books of Uí Mhaine, Ballymote, Lecan and Fermoy”, in: Cunningham, Bernadette, Siobhán Fitzpatrick [eds.], and Petra Schnabel [picture ed.], Treasures of the Royal Irish Academy Library, Dublin: Royal Irish Academy, 2009. 17–31.
Carey, John, “The LU copy of Lebor gabála”, in: Carey, John [ed.], Lebor gabála Érenn: textual history and pseudohistory, Irish Texts Society, Subsidiary Series 20, Dublin: Irish Texts Society, 2009. 21–32.
Carey, John, “Tara and the supernatural”, in: Bhreathnach, Edel [ed.], The kingship and landscape of Tara, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2005. 32–48.
Carey, John, “The names of the plains beneath the lakes of Ireland”, in: Carey, John, Máire Herbert, and Kevin Murray (eds.), Cín Chille Cúile: texts, saints and places. Essays in honour of Pádraig Ó Riain, Celtic Studies Publications 9, Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 2004. 44–57.
Carey, John, “[Multiple contributions]”, Oxford dictionary of national biography, Online: Oxford University Press. URL: <http://www.oxforddnb.com>.
Carey, John, “Remarks on dating”, in: Carey, John [ed.], Duanaire Finn: reassessments, Irish Texts Society, Subsidiary Series 13, London: Irish Texts Society, 2003. 1–18.
Carey, John, “The seven heavens and the twelve dragons in insular apocalyptic”, in: McNamara, Martin (ed.), Apocalyptic and eschatological heritage: the Middle East and Celtic realms, Dublin and Portland: Four Courts Press, 2003. 121–136.
Carey, John [tr.], “[Various contributions]”, in: Koch, John T., and John Carey (eds.), The Celtic Heroic Age. Literary sources for ancient Celtic Europe and early Ireland & Wales, Celtic Studies Publications 1, 4th ed. (1995), Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 2003. [Various].
Carey, John, “Nōdons, Lugus, Windos”, in: Ternes, Charles-Marie, and Hartmut Zinser (eds.), Dieux des Celtes / Goetter der Kelten / Gods of the Celts, Études luxembourgeoises d’histoire et de science des religions 1, Luxembourg: Association européenne pour l’étude scientifique des religions, 2002. 99–126.
Carey, John, “Varieties of supernatural contact in the Life of Adomnán”, in: Carey, John, Máire Herbert, and Pádraig Ó Riain (eds.), Studies in Irish hagiography: saints and scholars, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2001. 49–62.
Carey, John, “The finding of Arthur’s grave: a story from Clonmacnoise?”, in: Carey, John, John T. Koch, and Pierre-Yves Lambert (eds.), Ildánach Ildírech. A festschrift for Proinsias Mac Cana, Celtic Studies Publications 4, Andover and Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 1999. 1–13.
Carey, John, “Cú Chulainn as ailing hero”, in: Black, Ronald, William Gillies, and Roibeard Ó Maolalaigh (eds.), Celtic connections: proceedings of the Tenth International Congress of Celtic Studies, vol. 1, East Linton: Tuckwell Press, 1999. 190–198.
Carey, John, “In tenga bithnua: from apocalypse to homily?”, in: O'Loughlin, Thomas [ed.], The Scriptures and early medieval Ireland: proceedings of the 1993 Conference of the Society for Hiberno-Latin Studies on Early Irish Exegesis and Homilectics, Instrumenta Patristica 31, Steenbrugge, Turnhout: In Abbatia S. Petri; Brepols, 1999. 51–68.
Carey, John, “Native elements in Irish pseudohistory”, in: Edel, Doris [ed.], Cultural identity and cultural integration. Ireland and Europe in the early Middle Ages, Blackrock: Four Courts Press, 1995. 45–60.
Carey, John, “The uses of tradition in Serglige Con Culainn”, in: Mallory, James P., and Gerard Stockman (eds.), Ulidia: proceedings of the First International Conference on the Ulster Cycle of Tales, Belfast and Emain Macha, 8–12 April 1994, Belfast: December, 1994. 77–84.