Bibliography

T. M. (Thomas Mowbray)
Charles-Edwards
s. xx / s. xxi

134 publications between 1971 and 2019 indexed
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Works authored

Charles-Edwards, T. M., Wales and the Britons, 350–1064, History of Wales, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., The Chronicle of Ireland: translated with an introduction and notes, 2 vols, Translated Texts for Historians 44, Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2006.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., The medieval Gaelic lawyer, Quiggin Pamphlets on the Sources of Mediaeval Gaelic History 3, Cambridge, 1999.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., Early Irish and Welsh kinship, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1993.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., The Welsh laws, Writers of Wales, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1989.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., and Fergus Kelly, Bechbretha: an Old Irish law-tract on bee-keeping, Early Irish Law Series 1, Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1983.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., Two medieval Welsh poems: Stori Gwenfrewi a'i Ffynnon ‘The story of Gwenfrewi and her well’ and Fynnon Wenfrewy ‘St Winefride's Well’, Llandysul: Gomer Press, 1971.

Works edited

Charles-Edwards, T. M., and R. J. W. Evans [eds], Wales and the wider world: Welsh history in an international context, Donington: Shaun Tyas, 2010.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., and Paul Russell (eds.), Tair colofn cyfraith: The three columns of law in medieval Wales: homicide, theft and fire, Cymdeithas Hanes Cyfraith Cymru 5, Bangor: The Welsh Legal History Society, 2007.
Charles-Edwards, T. M. [ed.], After Rome, The Short Oxford History of the British Isles, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., Morfydd E. Owen, and Paul Russell (eds.), The Welsh king and his court, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2000.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., Morfydd E. Owen, and D. B. Walters (eds.), Lawyers and laymen. Studies in the history of law, presented to Professor Dafydd Jenkins on his seventy-fifth birthday, Gwyl Ddewi 1986, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1986.

Contributions to journals

Charles-Edwards, T. M., “John Rhys and the Jesus Chair of Celtic at Oxford”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 77 (2019): 33–45.
Bemmer, Jaqueline, and T. M. Charles-Edwards, “Irish and Welsh law in the European contexts”, Clio@Themis 10 (2016). URL: <http://www.cliothemis.com/Irish-and-Welsh-Law-in-the>. 
abstract:
This paper traces the relationship of the Roman Empire with Ireland and Wales from roughly the fifth to the seventh centuries and probes the role that Roman and Canon law played there following the events of 410, based on evidence from authors, such as Prosper of Aquitaine, Venantius Fortunatus, Zosimus and Gildas, as well as the vernacular legal traditions. This approach allows us to investigate perceptions of legal identity in Post-Roman Britain and the echoes of Latin learning embraced in Ireland.
abstract:
This paper traces the relationship of the Roman Empire with Ireland and Wales from roughly the fifth to the seventh centuries and probes the role that Roman and Canon law played there following the events of 410, based on evidence from authors, such as Prosper of Aquitaine, Venantius Fortunatus, Zosimus and Gildas, as well as the vernacular legal traditions. This approach allows us to investigate perceptions of legal identity in Post-Roman Britain and the echoes of Latin learning embraced in Ireland.
T. M. Charles-Edwards, “[Review of: Patrick Sims-Williams, Irish Influence on medieval Welsh literature (2010)]”, in: Medium Ævum 81 (2012): 324.
T. M. Charles-Edwards, “[Review of: Daniel P. Mc Carthy, The Irish annals: their genesis, evolution and history (2008)]”, in: Studia Hibernica 36 (2009–2010): 207–210.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Dliged: its native and latinate usages”, Celtica 24 (2003): 65–78.
Charles-Edwards, Thomas, “The Uí Néill 695–743: the rise and fall of dynasties”, Peritia 16 (2002): 396–418.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Geis, prophecy, omen, and oath”, Celtica 23 (1999): 38–59.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “The construction of the Hibernensis”, Peritia 12 (1998): 209–237.  
abstract:
This study uses a single main tool, comparison of the collection of ‘contrary cases’ at the end of the Collectio canonum Hibernensis (book 67 in the A recension) with corresponding material in books 21–29. It has two main purposes, to reveal something of the way in which the compilers worked and to help towards resolving the issue of which recension was the earlier.
abstract:
This study uses a single main tool, comparison of the collection of ‘contrary cases’ at the end of the Collectio canonum Hibernensis (book 67 in the A recension) with corresponding material in books 21–29. It has two main purposes, to reveal something of the way in which the compilers worked and to help towards resolving the issue of which recension was the earlier.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “A contract between king and people in early medieval Ireland? Críth gablach on kingship”, Peritia 8 (1994): 107–119.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “The new edition of Adomnán’s Life of Columba”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 26 (Winter, 1993): 65–73.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Críth Gablach and the law of status”, Peritia 5 (1986): 53–73.  
abstract:
This paper presents a detailed study of the determinants of social status as set out in Críth Gablach (c. AD 700), an Irish law tract on social classification which attempts a systematic analysis of the status of the free and noble classes (excluding the church and the professions) in early medieval Irish society. The nature and determinants of status are considered and the ranks of society set out in detail. To be a noble was to be hereditarily a lord of freemen in clientship – lordship rather than actual income ennobled, though other factors were relevant. For the non-noble freeman, a house, land and material assets are the basis of status. Lordship, however, appears to be economically central to the condition of the non-noble grades. Críth Gablach is one of the few outstanding pieces of social analysis from early medieval Europe.
abstract:
This paper presents a detailed study of the determinants of social status as set out in Críth Gablach (c. AD 700), an Irish law tract on social classification which attempts a systematic analysis of the status of the free and noble classes (excluding the church and the professions) in early medieval Irish society. The nature and determinants of status are considered and the ranks of society set out in detail. To be a noble was to be hereditarily a lord of freemen in clientship – lordship rather than actual income ennobled, though other factors were relevant. For the non-noble freeman, a house, land and material assets are the basis of status. Lordship, however, appears to be economically central to the condition of the non-noble grades. Críth Gablach is one of the few outstanding pieces of social analysis from early medieval Europe.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Bede, the Irish and the Britons”, Celtica 15 (1983): 42–52.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Honour and status in some Irish and Welsh prose tales”, Ériu 29 (1978): 123–141.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “The social background of Irish peregrinatio”, Celtica 11 (1976): 43–59.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Kinship, status and the origins of the hide”, Past & Present 56 (1972): 3–33.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “The date of the Four Branches of the Mabinogi”, Transactions of the Honourable Society of Cymmrodorion 1970–1972 (1971): 263–298.
Welsh Journals Online: <link>
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “The heir-apparent in Irish and Welsh law”, Celtica 9 (1971): 180–190.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Varia IV: Wb. 28c14 and the ‘exclusive’ use of the equative in Old Irish”, Ériu 22 (1971): 188–189.

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

Charles-Edwards, T. M., “The Welsh bardic grammars on litterae”, in: Hayden, Deborah, and Paul Russell (eds), Grammatica, gramadach and gramadeg: vernacular grammar and grammarians in medieval Ireland and Wales, Studies in the History of the Language Sciences 125, Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 2016. 149–160.  
abstract:
The first part of this chapter considers the relatively straightforward relationship between the section on letters in Gramadegau Penceirddiaid (GP), the Welsh vernacular grammars, and the section on Litterae in Donatus’s Ars Maior. It then goes on to consider the more problematic case of how the voiced dental fricative /ð/, now written in Welsh with a double dd, was spelt in the different versions of GP. In particular the adoption of the Latin abbreviation for que as a spelling for /ð/ in the Peniarth 20 version is considered in the context of the development of consistent orthographies in late Middle Welsh.
abstract:
The first part of this chapter considers the relatively straightforward relationship between the section on letters in Gramadegau Penceirddiaid (GP), the Welsh vernacular grammars, and the section on Litterae in Donatus’s Ars Maior. It then goes on to consider the more problematic case of how the voiced dental fricative /ð/, now written in Welsh with a double dd, was spelt in the different versions of GP. In particular the adoption of the Latin abbreviation for que as a spelling for /ð/ in the Peniarth 20 version is considered in the context of the development of consistent orthographies in late Middle Welsh.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Táin bó Cuailnge, hagiography and history”, in: Carey, John, Kevin Murray, and Caitríona Ó Dochartaigh (eds), Sacred histories: a Festschrift for Máire Herbert, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2015. 86–102.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “The manuscript transmission of Bretha comaithchesa”, in: Boyle, Elizabeth, and Deborah Hayden (eds), Authorities and adaptations: the reworking and transmission of textual sources in medieval Ireland, Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 2014. 95–120.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Dynastic succession in early medieval Wales”, in: Griffiths, Ralph A., and Phillipp R. Schofield (eds.), Wales and the Welsh in the Middle Ages: essays presented to J. Beverley Smith, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2011. 70–88.
Charles-Edwards, Thomas, “Whitley Stokes and early Irish law”, in: Boyle, Elizabeth, and Paul Russell (eds.), The tripartite life of Whitley Stokes (1830-1909), Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2011. 161–174.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “The structure and purpose of Adomnán’s Vita Columbae”, in: Aist, Rodney, Thomas Owen Clancy, Thomas O'Loughlin, and Jonathan M. Wooding (eds), Adomnán of Iona: theologian, lawmaker, peacemaker, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2010. 205–218.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Celtic kings: ‘priestly vegetables’?”, in: Baxter, Stephen, Catherine E. Karkov, Janet L. Nelson, and David Pelteret (eds), Early medieval studies in memory of Patrick Wormald, Studies in Early Medieval Britain, Aldershot: Ashgate, 2009. 65–80.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Middle Welsh mae ‘is’”, in: Smelik, Bernadette, Rijcklof Hofman, Camiel Hamans, and David Cram (eds.), A companion in linguistics: a Festschrift for Anders Ahlqvist on the occasion of his sixtieth birthday, Nijmegen: Stichting Uitgeverij de Keltische Draak, 2005. 161–170.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Early Irish law”, in: Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí [ed.], A new history of Ireland, vol. 1: Prehistoric and early Ireland, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005. 331–337.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Iarlaithe (supp. d. 481)”, Oxford dictionary of national biography, Online: Oxford University Press. URL: <http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/14664>.
Charles-Edwards, Thomas, “Gorsedd, dadl, and llys: assemblies and courts in medieval Wales”, in: Pantos, Aliki, and Sarah Semple (eds), Assembly places and practices in medieval Europe, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2004. 95–108.
Charles-Edwards, Thomas, “Nations and kingdoms: a view from above”, in: Charles-Edwards, T. M. [ed.], After Rome, The Short Oxford History of the British Isles, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003. 23–58.
Charles-Edwards, Thomas, “Conclusion”, in: Charles-Edwards, T. M. [ed.], After Rome, The Short Oxford History of the British Isles, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003. 259–270.
Charles-Edwards, Thomas, “Introduction”, in: Charles-Edwards, T. M. [ed.], After Rome, The Short Oxford History of the British Isles, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003. 1–20.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “The Northern Lectionary: a source for the Codex Salmanticensis?”, in: Cartwright, Jane [ed.], Celtic hagiography and saints’ cults, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2003. 148–160.
Charles-Edwards, Thomas, “Conversion to Christianity”, in: Charles-Edwards, T. M. [ed.], After Rome, The Short Oxford History of the British Isles, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003. 103–139.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Érlam: the patron-saint of an Irish church”, in: Thacker, Alan, and Richard Sharpe (eds.), Local saints and local churches in the early medieval West, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002. 267–290.
Charles-Edwards, Thomas, “Tochmarc Étaíne: a literal interpretation”, in: Richter, Michael, and Jean-Michel Picard (eds.), Ogma: essays in Celtic studies in honour of Próinséas Ní Chatháin, Dublin: Four Courts, 2002. 165–181.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Food, drink and clothing in the Laws of Court”, in: Charles-Edwards, T. M., Morfydd E. Owen, and Paul Russell (eds.), The Welsh king and his court, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2000. 319–337.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “‘The continuation of Bede’, s.a. 750: high-kings, kings of Tara and ‘Bretwaldas’”, in: Smyth, Alfred P. [ed.], Seanchas. Studies in early and medieval Irish archaeology, history and literature in honour of Francis J. Byrne, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2000. 137–145.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., and Nerys Ann Jones, “Breintiau gwŷr Powys: The liberties of the men of Powys”, in: Charles-Edwards, T. M., Morfydd E. Owen, and Paul Russell (eds.), The Welsh king and his court, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2000. 191–223.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “The context and uses of literacy in early Christian Ireland”, in: Pryce, Huw [ed.], Literacy in medieval Celtic societies, Cambridge Studies in Medieval Literature 33, Cambridge, New York, Melbourne: Cambridge University Press, 1998. 62–82.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “The penitential of Columbanus”, in: Lapidge, Michael (ed.), Columbanus: studies on the Latin writings, Studies in Celtic History 17, Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 1997. 217–239.
T. M. Charles-Edwards, “The date of the Four Branches of the Mabinogi”, in: C. W. Sullivan III (ed.), The Mabinogi: a book of essays (1996): 19–58.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Language and society among the Insular Celts, AD 400—1000”, in: Green, Miranda J. [ed.], The Celtic world, London, New York: Routledge, 1995. 703–736.
Charles-Edwards, Gifford, and T. M. Charles-Edwards, “The continuation of Brut y tywysogion in Peniarth MS. 20”, in: Jones, Tegwyn, and E. B. Fryde (eds), Ysgrifau a cherddi cyflwynedig i Daniel Huws: Essays and poems presented to Daniel Huws, Aberystwyth: National Library of Wales, 1994. 293–305.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Palladius, Prosper, and Leo the Great: mission and primatial authority”, in: Dumville, David N., and Lesley Abrams (eds.), Saint Patrick, AD 493–1993, Studies in Celtic History 13, Woodbridge: Boydell, 1993. 1–12.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “The Arthur of history”, in: Bromwich, Rachel, A. O. H. Jarman, and Brynley F. Roberts (eds.), The Arthur of the Welsh. The Arthurian legend in medieval Welsh literature, Arthurian Literature in the Middle Ages 1, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1991. 15–32.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Early medieval kingships in the British Isles”, in: Bassett, Steven [ed.], The origins of Anglo-Saxon kingdoms, Studies in the Early History of Britain, Leicester: Leicester University Press, 1989. 28–39, 245–248.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “The texts: i. Introduction”, in: Charles-Edwards, T. M., Morfydd E. Owen, and D. B. Walters (eds.), Lawyers and laymen. Studies in the history of law, presented to Professor Dafydd Jenkins on his seventy-fifth birthday, Gwyl Ddewi 1986, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1986. 111–116.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “The texts: iii. The ‘Iorwerth’ text”, in: Charles-Edwards, T. M., Morfydd E. Owen, and D. B. Walters (eds.), Lawyers and laymen. Studies in the history of law, presented to Professor Dafydd Jenkins on his seventy-fifth birthday, Gwyl Ddewi 1986, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1986. 137–178.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “Nau kynywedi teithiauc”, in: Jenkins, Dafydd, and Morfydd E. Owen (eds), The Welsh Law of Women, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1980. 23–39.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “The ‘Iorwerth’ text”, in: Jenkins, Dafydd, and Morfydd E. Owen (eds), The Welsh Law of Women, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1980. 161–185.
Charles-Edwards, T. M., “The authenticity of the Gododdin: an historian’s view”, in: Bromwich, Rachel, and R. Brinley Jones (eds.), Astudiaethau ar yr hengerdd / Studies in old Welsh poetry: cyflwynedig i Syr Idris Foster, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1978. 44–71.

As honouree

Edmonds, Fiona, and Paul Russell (eds.), Tome: studies in medieval Celtic history and law in honour of Thomas Charles-Edwards, Studies in Celtic History 31, Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 2011.

As honouree

Edmonds, Fiona, and Paul Russell (eds.), Tome: studies in medieval Celtic history and law in honour of Thomas Charles-Edwards, Studies in Celtic History 31, Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 2011.

About the author

ap Huw, Maredudd, “Bibliography of the writings of Thomas Charles-Edwards”, in: Edmonds, Fiona, and Paul Russell (eds.), Tome: studies in medieval Celtic history and law in honour of Thomas Charles-Edwards, Studies in Celtic History 31, Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 2011. 217–224.