Bibliography

Thomas Owen
Clancy
s. xx / s. xxi

43 publications between 1991 and ? indexed
Sort by:

Works authored

Clancy, Thomas Owen, and Gilbert Márkus, Iona: the earliest poetry of a Celtic monastery, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 1995.

Theses

Clancy, Thomas Owen, “Saint and fool: the image and function of Cummíne Fota and Comgán Mac Da Cherda in early Irish literature”, PhD thesis: University of Edinburgh, 1991.
Edinburgh Research Archive: <link>

Websites

Clancy, Thomas Owen [princip. invest.], and Sofia Evemalm-Graham [research ass.], Eòlas nan naomh: early Christianity in Uist, Onine. URL: <https://uistsaints.co.uk>. 
abstract:
This project seeks to take the first steps towards a better understanding of early Christianity in Uist, focusing primarily on place-names and archaeological evidence. On the basis of an initial survey of the material, 45 sites have been identified as of potential interest. The initial analysis of these sites is presented here, but the aim of the project is to stimulate further discussions on the sites in question and Uist’s role in the early Christianity of the Western Isles.
abstract:
This project seeks to take the first steps towards a better understanding of early Christianity in Uist, focusing primarily on place-names and archaeological evidence. On the basis of an initial survey of the material, 45 sites have been identified as of potential interest. The initial analysis of these sites is presented here, but the aim of the project is to stimulate further discussions on the sites in question and Uist’s role in the early Christianity of the Western Isles.
Clancy, Thomas Owen [princip. inv.], Rachel Butter [res.], Gilbert Márkus [res.], and Matthew Barr, Saints in Scottish place-names, Online: University of Glasgow. URL: <http://saintsplaces.gla.ac.uk>. 
abstract:
The database that has been assembled presents the fruits of our research. It contains over 5000 places, 13,000 place-names, and some 750 saints potentially commemorated in these names. The backbone of the database are records drawn from the Ordnance Survey 1st Edition 6" maps, produced from 1843 to 1882. All names we could identify from these maps likely to commemorate saints, and many unlikely to but nonetheless worth considering, have been harvested for the database, and linked to the current map forms of the names, where they are still current. We harvested many other sources for earlier historical forms: earlier maps, monastic cartularies, the Register of the Great Seal, antiquarian accounts. This process of historical harvesting is not complete, but we aim to continue to augment the site through periodic harvesting and uploading of selected documents. We would be happy to hear from individuals willing to help us in filling out our historically recorded forms. At present, as well as information about the places recorded, and historical forms of names, we have identified where possible and applicable the saint or saints who may be commemorated in the place-names. We have been careful to indicate our level of confidence in these identifications. We have also excluded many of the names recorded here as not containing saints' names. Those which have been identified as having saints' names have an [S] symbol after them. There are also entries on individual saints and groups of saints. These records too are being augmented, and should become incrementally fuller over the next few months. One major analytical tool not yet available is the detailed analysis of each name, according to the meaning of its individual elements. This is work in progress.
(source: website)
abstract:
The database that has been assembled presents the fruits of our research. It contains over 5000 places, 13,000 place-names, and some 750 saints potentially commemorated in these names. The backbone of the database are records drawn from the Ordnance Survey 1st Edition 6" maps, produced from 1843 to 1882. All names we could identify from these maps likely to commemorate saints, and many unlikely to but nonetheless worth considering, have been harvested for the database, and linked to the current map forms of the names, where they are still current. We harvested many other sources for earlier historical forms: earlier maps, monastic cartularies, the Register of the Great Seal, antiquarian accounts. This process of historical harvesting is not complete, but we aim to continue to augment the site through periodic harvesting and uploading of selected documents. We would be happy to hear from individuals willing to help us in filling out our historically recorded forms. At present, as well as information about the places recorded, and historical forms of names, we have identified where possible and applicable the saint or saints who may be commemorated in the place-names. We have been careful to indicate our level of confidence in these identifications. We have also excluded many of the names recorded here as not containing saints' names. Those which have been identified as having saints' names have an [S] symbol after them. There are also entries on individual saints and groups of saints. These records too are being augmented, and should become incrementally fuller over the next few months. One major analytical tool not yet available is the detailed analysis of each name, according to the meaning of its individual elements. This is work in progress.
(source: website)

Works edited

McLeod, Wilson, Abigail Burnyeat, Domhnall Uilleam Stiùbhart, Thomas Owen Clancy, and Roibeard Ó Maolalaigh (eds), Bile ós chrannaibh: a Festschrift for William Gillies, Tigh a' Mhaide, Brig o' Turk, Perthshire: Clann Tuirc, 2010. xxv + 494 pp.
Aist, Rodney, Thomas Owen Clancy, Thomas O'Loughlin, and Jonathan M. Wooding (eds), Adomnán of Iona: theologian, lawmaker, peacemaker, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2010.
Clancy, Thomas Owen, and Murray Pittock (eds.), The Edinburgh history of Scottish literature, 3 vols, vol. 1: From Columba to the Union (until 1707), Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2007.
Clancy, Thomas Owen (ed.), The triumph tree: Scotland's earliest poetry AD 550–1350, Canongate Classics 86, Edinburgh: Canongate, 1999.  
Translations, with notes. Latin texts translated by Gilbert Márkus, Welsh texts by Joseph P. Clancy, Gaelic and Old English texts by Thomas Owen Clancy, Norse texts by Paul Bibire and Judith Jesch.
Translations, with notes. Latin texts translated by Gilbert Márkus, Welsh texts by Joseph P. Clancy, Gaelic and Old English texts by Thomas Owen Clancy, Norse texts by Paul Bibire and Judith Jesch.

Contributions to journals

Clancy, Thomas Owen, “Sequencing Dafydd ap Gwilym”, Proceedings of the Harvard Celtic Colloquium 36 (2018): 30–49.
Clancy, Thomas Owen, “Saints in the Scottish landscape”, Proceedings of the Harvard Celtic Colloquium 33 (2013, 2014): 1–34.
Clancy, Thomas Owen, “Gaelic in medieval Scotland: advent and expansion [The Sir John Rhys Memorial Lecture, 2009]”, Proceedings of the British Academy 167 (2011): 349–392.
Clancy, Thomas Owen, “The needs of strangers in the Four Branches of the Mabinogi”, Quaestio Insularis 6 (2005): 1–24.
Clancy, Thomas Owen, “Philosopher-king: Nechtan mac Der-Ilei”, The Scottish Historical Review 83:2 (October, 2004): 125–149.
Clancy, Thomas Owen, “Diarmait sapientissimus: the career of Diarmait, dalta Daigre, abbot of Iona”, Peritia 17–18 (2003–2004): 215–232.
Clancy, Thomas Owen, “The real St Ninian”, The Innes Review 52:1 (Spring, 2001): 1–28 (missing footnotes in vol. 53:1 (2002): 59).
Clancy, Thomas Owen, “The foundation legend of Laurencekirk revisited”, The Innes Review 50:1 (1999): 83–88.
Thomas Owen Clancy, “[Review of: Alan Macquarrie, The saints of Scotland: essays in Scottish church history AD 450–1093 (1997)]”, in: The Innes Review 49 (1998): 184–186.
Clancy, Thomas Owen, “Columba, Adomnán and the cult of saints in Scotland”, The Innes Review 48:1 (Spring, 1997): 1–26.
Clancy, Thomas Owen, “Fools and adultery in some early Irish texts”, Ériu 44 (1993): 105–124.
Clancy, Thomas Owen, “Mac Steléne and the eight in Armagh: identity and context”, Éigse 26 (1992): 80–91.

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

Clancy, Thomas Owen, “Early Gaelic nature poetry revisited”, in: Henley, Georgia [ed.], Paul Russell [ed.], and Joseph F. Eska [assist ed.], Rhetoric and reality in medieval Celtic literature: studies in honor of Daniel F. Melia, CSANA Yearbook 11–12, Hamilton, NY: Colgate University Press, 2014. 8–19.
Clancy, Thomas Owen, “The kingdoms of the north: poetry, places, politics”, in: Woolf, Alex (ed.), Beyond the Gododdin: Dark Age Scotland in medieval Wales. The proceedings of a day conference held on 19 February 2005, St John's House Papers 13, St Andrews, 2013. 153–175.
Clancy, Thomas Owen, “Iona v. Kells: succession, jurisdiction and politics in the Columban familia in the later tenth century”, in: Edmonds, Fiona, and Paul Russell (eds.), Tome: studies in medieval Celtic history and law in honour of Thomas Charles-Edwards, Studies in Celtic History 31, Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 2011. 89–101.
Clancy, Thomas Owen, “The big man, the footsteps, and the fissile saint: paradigms and problems in studies of insular saints' cults”, in: Boardman, Steve, and Eila Williamson (eds.), The cult of saints and the Virgin Mary in medieval Scotland, Studies in Celtic History 28, Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 2010. 1–20.
Clancy, Thomas Owen, “Atholl, Banff, Earn and Elgin: ‘new Irelands’ in the east revisited”, in: McLeod, Wilson, Abigail Burnyeat, Domhnall Uilleam Stiùbhart, Thomas Owen Clancy, and Roibeard Ó Maolalaigh (eds), Bile ós chrannaibh: a Festschrift for William Gillies, Tigh a' Mhaide, Brig o' Turk, Perthshire: Clann Tuirc, 2010. xxv + 494 pp. 79–102.
Clancy, Thomas Owen, “Adomnán in medieval Gaelic literary tradition”, in: Aist, Rodney, Thomas Owen Clancy, Thomas O'Loughlin, and Jonathan M. Wooding (eds), Adomnán of Iona: theologian, lawmaker, peacemaker, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2010. 112–122.
Clancy, Thomas Owen, “The cults of Saints Patrick and Palladius in early medieval Scotland”, in: Boardman, Steve, John Reuben Davies, and Eila Williamson (eds.), Saints’ cults in the Celtic world, Studies in Celtic History 25, Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 2009. 18–41.
Clancy, Thomas Owen, “Deer and the early church in North-Eastern Scotland”, in: Forsythe, Katherine (ed.), Studies on the Book of Deer, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2008. 363–397.
Broun, Dauvit, Thomas Owen Clancy, and Katherine Forsyth, “The property records: text and translation”, in: Forsythe, Katherine (ed.), Studies on the Book of Deer, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2008. 131–144.
Brown, Ian, Thomas Owen Clancy, Susan Manning, and Murray G. H. Pittock, “Scottish literature: criticism and the canon”, in: Clancy, Thomas Owen, and Murray Pittock (eds.), The Edinburgh history of Scottish literature, 3 vols, vol. 1: From Columba to the Union (until 1707), Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2007. 3–15.
Clancy, Thomas Owen, “The poetry of the court: praise”, in: Clancy, Thomas Owen, and Murray Pittock (eds.), The Edinburgh history of Scottish literature, 3 vols, vol. 1: From Columba to the Union (until 1707), Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2007. 63–71.
Clancy, Thomas Owen, “A fragmentary literature: narrative and lyric from the early middle ages”, in: Clancy, Thomas Owen, and Murray Pittock (eds.), The Edinburgh history of Scottish literature, 3 vols, vol. 1: From Columba to the Union (until 1707), Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2007. 123–132.
Clancy, Thomas Owen, “Brendan’s European tour: the Middle Irish poem Mochen, mochen, a Brénaind and the changing nature of pilgrimage in the eleventh century”, in: Strijbosch, Clara, and Glyn S. Burgess (eds.), The Brendan legend. Texts and versions, The Northern World 24, Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2006. 35–52.
Thomas Owen Clancy, “Aithbhreac nighean Coirceadail”, in: John T. Koch (ed.), Celtic culture: a historical encyclopedia (2006): 33–34.
Clancy, Thomas Owen, “<Various contributions>”, in: Koch, John T. [ed.], Celtic culture: a historical encyclopedia, 5 vols, Santa Barbara, Denver and Oxford: ABC-Clio, 2006.
includes: Thomas Owen Clancy, ‘Comgán mac Da Cherda’, vol. 2
Thomas Owen Clancy, “Aberdeen Breviary”, in: John T. Koch (ed.), Celtic culture: a historical encyclopedia (2006): 1.
Thomas Owen Clancy, “Caimbeul, Donnchadh”, in: John T. Koch (ed.), Celtic culture: a historical encyclopedia (2006): 326.
Clancy, Thomas Owen, “Magpie hagiography in twelfth-century Scotland: the case of Libellus de nativitate Sancti Cuthberti”, in: Cartwright, Jane [ed.], Celtic hagiography and saints’ cults, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2003. 216–231.
Clancy, Thomas Owen, “Scottish saints and national identities in the early Middle Ages”, in: Thacker, Alan, and Richard Sharpe (eds.), Local saints and local churches in the early medieval West, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002. 397–421.
Clancy, Thomas Owen, “Reading medieval Irish satire: the trial of Mac Teléne”, in: Reale, N. M., and R. E. Sternglantz (eds), Satura: studies in medieval literature in honour of Robert R. Raymo, Donington: Shaun Tyas, 2001. 20–47.
Clancy, Thomas Owen, “Scotland, the ‘Nennian’ recension of Historia Brittonum, and the Lebor Bretnach”, in: Taylor, Simon (ed.), Kings, clerics and chronicles in Scotland, 500–1297: essays in honour of Marjorie Ogilvie Anderson on the occasion of her ninetieth birthday, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2000. 87–107.
Clancy, Thomas Owen, “Women poets in early medieval Ireland”, in: Meek, Christine, and Katharine Simms (eds.), ‘The fragility of her sex’? Medieval Irishwomen in their European context, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 1996. 43–72.