Bibliography

David N. (David Norman)
Dumville

122 publications between 1972 and 2018 indexed
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Works authored

Dumville, David N., A palaeographer's review: the insular system of scripts in the early Middle Ages, 2 vols, vol. 2, Kansai University Institute of Oriental and Occidental Studies, Sources and Materials Series20.2, Suita, Osaka: Kansai University Press, 2007.
Dumville, David N., Celtic essays, 2001–2007, 2 vols, vol. 1, Aberdeen: Centre for Celtic Studies, University of Aberdeen, 2007.
Dumville, David N., Celtic essays, 2001–2007, 2 vols, vol. 2, Aberdeen: Centre for Celtic Studies, University of Aberdeen, 2007.
Dumville, David N., Abbreviations used in insular script before A.D. 850: tabulation based on the work of W. M. Lindsay, Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic Manuscript Studies 2, Cambridge: Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic, University of Cambridge, 2004.
Ó Néill, Pádraig P., and David N. Dumville (eds. and trs.), Cáin Adomnáin and Canones Adomnani, Basic Texts in Gaelic History2, Cambridge: Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic, University of Cambridge, 2003.
Dumville, David N., Annales Cambriae, A.D. 682-954: texts A-C in parallel, Cambridge: Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic, University of Cambridge, 2002. pp. v-xix + 1-24 pp.
Dumville, David N., Saint David of Wales, Kathleen Hughes Memorial Lectures1, Cambridge: ASNC, 2000.
Dumville, David N., A palaeographer's review: the insular system of scripts in the early Middle Ages, 2 vols, vol. 1, Kansai University Institute of Oriental and Occidental Studies, Sources and Materials Series20.1, Suita, Osaka: Kansai University Press, 1999.
Dumville, David N., Councils and synods of the Gaelic early and central Middle Ages, Quiggin Pamphlets on the Sources of Mediaeval Gaelic History3, Cambridge: Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic, University of Cambridge, 1997. ii + 62 pp.
Dumville, David [ed.], The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle: a collaborative edition, vol. 1. Facsimile of MS. F.: The Domitian bilingual, Cambridge: Brewer, 1995.
Dumville, David N., and Lesley Abrams (eds.), Saint Patrick, AD 493–1993, Studies in Celtic History 13, Woodbridge: Boydell, 1993.
Dumville, David N., English Caroline script and monastic history: studies in Benedictinism, AD 950-1030, Studies in Anglo-Saxon History6, Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 1993.
Dumville, David N., Britons and Anglo-Saxons in the Early Middle Ages, Variorum Collected Studies Series379, Aldershot: Variorum, 1993.
Dumville, David N., Liturgy and the ecclesiastical history of late Anglo-Saxon England: four studies, Studies in Anglo-Saxon History5, Woodbridge: Boydell, 1992.
Dumville, David N., Wessex and England from Alfred to Edgar, Studies in Anglo-Saxon History3, Woodbridge: Boydell, 1992.
Dumville, David N., Histories and pseudo-histories of the insular Middle Ages, Variorum Collected Studies Series316, Aldershot: Variorum, 1990.  
abstract:
The centuries that followed the Roman withdrawal from the British Isles have not been called 'Dark' for nothing; in the sources that survive, fact and legend seem inextricably intertwined, and the work of later medieval writers has only deepened the confusion. Dr. Dumville has done much to help dissect and disentangle these sources, probing the cultural history of the Insular Middle Ages, tracing the channels through which historical knowledge was transmitted and the interaction of political thought and historical writing - ideologically based historiography looms large as evidence in any attempt to grasp how medieval people comprehended their past. In these essays, he concentrates on the historiographical practices of the Irish, Britons and English, which shared much in common. Specific themes are the Insular cultivation of genealogy, the classic British pseudo-history (as in the Historia Brittonum and Geoffrey of Monmouth), the important Cistercian school of historical studies at Sawley, and the traditions of annalistic chronicling. An important section of Addenda is also provided.
(source: the publisher’s promotional abstract)
abstract:
The centuries that followed the Roman withdrawal from the British Isles have not been called 'Dark' for nothing; in the sources that survive, fact and legend seem inextricably intertwined, and the work of later medieval writers has only deepened the confusion. Dr. Dumville has done much to help dissect and disentangle these sources, probing the cultural history of the Insular Middle Ages, tracing the channels through which historical knowledge was transmitted and the interaction of political thought and historical writing - ideologically based historiography looms large as evidence in any attempt to grasp how medieval people comprehended their past. In these essays, he concentrates on the historiographical practices of the Irish, Britons and English, which shared much in common. Specific themes are the Insular cultivation of genealogy, the classic British pseudo-history (as in the Historia Brittonum and Geoffrey of Monmouth), the important Cistercian school of historical studies at Sawley, and the traditions of annalistic chronicling. An important section of Addenda is also provided.
(source: the publisher’s promotional abstract)
Dumville, David N., The Historia Brittonum, vol. 2: The ‘Chartres’ recension, Cambridge: Brewer, 1988.
Dumville, David N., The Historia Brittonum, 3 vols, Cambridge: Brewer, 1985–1988.
Hughes, Kathleen, Church and society in Ireland, A. D. 400–1200, ed. David N. Dumville, Variorum Collected Studies Series258, London: Variorum Reprints, 1987.
Dumville, David N., The Historia Brittonum, vol. 7: The Sawley and Durham recensions, Cambridge: Brewer, 1986.
Brooke, Christopher N. L., and David Dumville, The church and the Welsh border in the central Middle Ages, Studies in Celtic History8, Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 1986.
Dumville, David N. [ed.], The Historia Brittonum, vol. 3: The ‘Vatican’ recension, Cambridge: Brewer, 1985.
Dumville, David N., and Michael Lapidge (eds.), The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle: a collaborative edition, vol. 17. The annals of St. Neots with Vita prima Sancti Neoti, Cambridge: Brewer, 1985.
Grabowski, Kathryn, and David Dumville [ed.], Chronicles and annals of mediaeval Ireland and Wales: the Clonmacnoise-group texts, Studies in Celtic History4, Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 1984.
Hughes, Kathleen, Celtic Britain in the early Middle Ages: studies in Scottish and Welsh sources, ed. David N. Dumville, Studies in Celtic History2, Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 1980.  
Papers revised or previously unpublished
Papers revised or previously unpublished
Dumville, David N., “Textual history of the Welsh-Latin Historia Brittonum”, Ph.D. thesis: Edinburgh University, 1975.  
abstract:
This thesis presents a new edition of the major recensions of the Historia Brittonum. It is the first to depart from the pattern of conflated texts which has been followed by editors since 1691. Each may now be read as a text in its own right. I have argued that the 'Harleian' recension is the primary version of the Historia Brittonum and belongs to the year 829/30, and have shown that the attribution of the work to one 'Nennius' is late and unacceptable. The complicated textual tradition has been examined, from this early-ninth-century origin, throughout its mediaeval history; the fullest development is seen in the 'Sawley' recension of the beginning of the thirteenth century. I have also considered the early modern tradition of the work, represented by a large group of paper manuscripts prepared by or for the antiquaries of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries as no printed text was available until 1691. In addition to detailed studies of manuscripts and textual tradition, I have prepared a literal modern English translation of the primary recension and have made a detailed preliminary study of its latinity. My remarks on the later recensions concentrate on establishing the filiation of the manuscripts and on placing each new version within the context of the textual tradition as a whole. This has seemed to be the primary requirement in any new investigation of the Historia. Work can now go forward, from a secure textual base, on the implications of this important series of texts for historical and literary studies.
(source: ERA)
Edinburgh Research Archive – PDF: <link>
abstract:
This thesis presents a new edition of the major recensions of the Historia Brittonum. It is the first to depart from the pattern of conflated texts which has been followed by editors since 1691. Each may now be read as a text in its own right. I have argued that the 'Harleian' recension is the primary version of the Historia Brittonum and belongs to the year 829/30, and have shown that the attribution of the work to one 'Nennius' is late and unacceptable. The complicated textual tradition has been examined, from this early-ninth-century origin, throughout its mediaeval history; the fullest development is seen in the 'Sawley' recension of the beginning of the thirteenth century. I have also considered the early modern tradition of the work, represented by a large group of paper manuscripts prepared by or for the antiquaries of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries as no printed text was available until 1691. In addition to detailed studies of manuscripts and textual tradition, I have prepared a literal modern English translation of the primary recension and have made a detailed preliminary study of its latinity. My remarks on the later recensions concentrate on establishing the filiation of the manuscripts and on placing each new version within the context of the textual tradition as a whole. This has seemed to be the primary requirement in any new investigation of the Historia. Work can now go forward, from a secure textual base, on the implications of this important series of texts for historical and literary studies.
(source: ERA)

Works edited

Jondorf, Gillian, and David N. Dumville (eds), France and the British Isles in the Middle Ages and Renaissance: essays by members of Girton College, Cambridge, in memory of Ruth Morgan, Woodbridge: Boydell, 1991.
Lapidge, Michael, and David N. Dumville (eds.), Gildas: new approaches, Studies in Celtic History5, Cambridge: Boydell Press, 1984.
Whitelock, Dorothy, Rosamund McKitterick, and David N. Dumville (eds.), Ireland in early medieval Europe: studies in memory of Kathleen Hughes, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1982.

Contributions to journals

Dumville, David N., “From late antiquity to early modernity: a history of Gaelic literature, A.D. 250–1750”, Proceedings of the Harvard Celtic Colloquium 36 (2018): 90–104.
Dumville, David N., “Mael Brigte mac Tornáin, pluralist coarb (†927)”, Journal of Celtic Studies 4 (2004): 97–116.
Dumville, David N., “Félire Óengusso. Problems of dating a monument of Old Irish”, Éigse 33 (2002): 19–48.
Dumville, David N. [ed.], “Cethri prímchenéla Dáil Riata”, Scottish Gaelic Studies 20 (2000): 170–191.
Dumville, David N., “Cath Fedo Euin”, Scottish Gaelic Studies 17 (1996): 114–127.
Dumville, David N., “[Review of: Smyth, Alfred P., King Alfred the Great, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1995]”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 31 (1996): 90–93.
Dumville, David N., “Ireland and Britain in Táin bó Fraích”, Études celtiques 32 (1996): 175–187.  
abstract:
[FR] Dùil Dromna Ceta et le Glossaire de Cormac
Le glossaire du Dùil Dromna Ceta révèle des étapes dans le développement des articles qui sont antérieures aux articles tels qu’ils se trouvent dans le glossaire de Cormac. C’est donc un témoin privilégié pour éclairer l’élaboration de ce dernier glossaire.
[EN] The value of Dúil Dromma Ceta for the study of Cormac’s Glossary lies in the fact that it can reveals stages in the development of glossary entries which predates the forms of entries attested in Cormac itself. DDC therefore is a valuable witness to the developement of Cormac’s Glossary.
Journal volume:  Persée – Études Celtiques, vol. 32, 1996: <link>
abstract:
[FR] Dùil Dromna Ceta et le Glossaire de Cormac
Le glossaire du Dùil Dromna Ceta révèle des étapes dans le développement des articles qui sont antérieures aux articles tels qu’ils se trouvent dans le glossaire de Cormac. C’est donc un témoin privilégié pour éclairer l’élaboration de ce dernier glossaire.
[EN] The value of Dúil Dromma Ceta for the study of Cormac’s Glossary lies in the fact that it can reveals stages in the development of glossary entries which predates the forms of entries attested in Cormac itself. DDC therefore is a valuable witness to the developement of Cormac’s Glossary.
Dumville, David N., “Two approaches to the dating of Navigatio sancti Brendani”, Studi medievali 29 (1988): 95–99.
Dumville, David N., “The historical value of the Historia Brittonum”, Arthurian Literature 6 (1986): 1–26.
Dumville, David N., “On editing and translating medieval Irish chronicles: the Annals of Ulster”, Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies 10 (Winter, 1985): 67–86.
Dumville, David N., “Late-seventh- or eighth-century evidence of the British transmission of Pelagius”, Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies 10 (Winter, 1985): 39–52.
Dumville, David N., “An early text of Geoffrey of Monmouth’s Historia regum Britanniae and the circulation of some Latin histories in twelfth-century Normandy”, Arthurian Literature 4 (1985): 1–36.
Dumville, David N., “The West Saxon genealogical regnal list and the chronology of early Wessex”, Peritia 4 (1985): 21–66.
Dumville, David N., “Language, literature, and law in medieval Ireland: some questions of transmission”, Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies 9 (Summer, 1985): 91–98.
Dumville, David N., “On the dating of the early Breton lawcodes”, Études Celtiques 21 (1984): 207–221.  
abstract:
Examen des critères permettant de déterminer l'origine et la date des Excerpta de Libris Romanorum et Francorum, texte de loi séculier breton. L’origine semble bien être armoricaine, comme le propose L. Fleuriot. Mais la date est difficile à préciser : les emprunts à la Lex Salica, définis par Ludwig Bieler, ne permettent pas une datation précise. Quant aux passages parallèles avec la Collectio Canonum Hibernensis, il est difficile de préciser le sens de l’emprunt (l’emprunt semble avoir été plutôt le fait de l’auteur des Excerpta). Il serait donc prudent de renoncer à la date 520 x 560 proposée par L. Fleuriot et de ranger provisoirement les Excerpta dans le VIIIe siècle.
Journal volume:  Persée – Études Celtiques, vol. 21, 1984: <link>
abstract:
Examen des critères permettant de déterminer l'origine et la date des Excerpta de Libris Romanorum et Francorum, texte de loi séculier breton. L’origine semble bien être armoricaine, comme le propose L. Fleuriot. Mais la date est difficile à préciser : les emprunts à la Lex Salica, définis par Ludwig Bieler, ne permettent pas une datation précise. Quant aux passages parallèles avec la Collectio Canonum Hibernensis, il est difficile de préciser le sens de l’emprunt (l’emprunt semble avoir été plutôt le fait de l’auteur des Excerpta). Il serait donc prudent de renoncer à la date 520 x 560 proposée par L. Fleuriot et de ranger provisoirement les Excerpta dans le VIIIe siècle.
Dumville, David N., “Some aspects of annalistic writing at Canterbury in the eleventh and early twelfth centuries”, Peritia 2 (1983): 23–57.
Dumville, David N., “Brittany and ‘Armes Prydein Vawr’”, Études Celtiques 20 (1983): 145–159.  
abstract:
Réévaluation des conditions historiques où fut écrit le poème gallois Armes Prydein Vawr (une prophétie politique appelant les Bretons à s’unir contre les Anglo-Saxons) . Ce poème daterait du milieu du Xe siècle. L’ intervention des bretons armoricains dans la «coalition celtique » évoquée par l’auteur du poème est surprenante, car les Bretons étaient alliés aux rois Anglo-saxons dans la première moitié du Xe s . ; mais cela se comprend si l’on admet que le poème évoque des mythes plutôt que des réalités. Le mythe de l’union des bretons armoricains et insulaires est un thème symbolisé par les rois Conan et Cadwaladr, deux chefs, armoricain et gallois, qui doivent réunifier les bretons. Leurs noms ont dû être associés par la tradition littéraire bien avant Armes Prydein Vawr.
Journal volume:  Persée – Études Celtiques, vol. 20, 1983: <link>
abstract:
Réévaluation des conditions historiques où fut écrit le poème gallois Armes Prydein Vawr (une prophétie politique appelant les Bretons à s’unir contre les Anglo-Saxons) . Ce poème daterait du milieu du Xe siècle. L’ intervention des bretons armoricains dans la «coalition celtique » évoquée par l’auteur du poème est surprenante, car les Bretons étaient alliés aux rois Anglo-saxons dans la première moitié du Xe s . ; mais cela se comprend si l’on admet que le poème évoque des mythes plutôt que des réalités. Le mythe de l’union des bretons armoricains et insulaires est un thème symbolisé par les rois Conan et Cadwaladr, deux chefs, armoricain et gallois, qui doivent réunifier les bretons. Leurs noms ont dû être associés par la tradition littéraire bien avant Armes Prydein Vawr.
Dumville, David, “Ekiurid’s Celtic lingua: an ethnological difficulty in Waltharius”, Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies 6 (Winter, 1983): 87–93.
Dumville, David N., “Motes and beams: two Insular computistical manuscripts”, Peritia 2 (1983): 248–256.
Dumville, David N., “The ‘six’ sons of Rhodri Mawr: a problem in Asser’s Life of King Alfred”, Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies 4 (Winter, 1982): 5–18.
Dumville, David N., “‘Beowulf’ and the Celtic world: the uses of evidence”, Traditio 37 (1981): 109–160.
Dumville, David N., “The sixteenth-century history of two Cambridge books from Sawley”, Transactions of the Cambridge Bibliographical Society 7:4 (1980): 427–444.
Dumville, David N., “The ætheling: a study in Anglo-Saxon constitutional history”, Anglo-Saxon England 8 (1979): 1–33.
Dumville, David N., “Towards an interpretation of Fís Adomnáin”, Studia Celtica 12–13 (1977–1978): 62–77.
Dumville, David N., “The Welsh Latin annals”, Studia Celtica 12–13 (1977–1978): 461–467.
Dumville, David N., “Sub-Roman Britain: history and legend”, History, new series, 62 (1977): 173–192.  
Dumville, David N., “On the north British section of the Historia Brittonum”, Welsh History Review 8:3 (June 1977, 1976–1977): 345–354.
Dumville, David N., “Celtic-Latin texts in northern England, c. 1150–c. 1250”, Celtica 12 (1977): 19–49.
Dumville, David N., “The textual history of Lebor Bretnach: a preliminary study”, Éigse 16:4 (Geimhreadh 1976, 1975–1976): 255–273.
Dumville, David N., “The Anglian collection of royal genealogies and regnal lists”, Anglo-Saxon England 5 (1976): 23–50.  
Reprinted with revisions in 1990, essay V.
– Cambridge Journals: <link>
Reprinted with revisions in 1990, essay V.
Dumville, David N., “Echtrae and immram: some problems of definition”, Ériu 27 (1976): 73–94.
Dumville, David N., “‘Nennius’ and the Historia Brittonum”, Studia Celtica 10–11 (1975–1976): 78–95.
Dumville, David N., “Scéla lái brátha and the collation of Leabhar na hUidhre”, Éigse 16:1 (Samhradh 1975, 1975–1976): 24–28.
Dumville, David N., “The Liber Floridus of Lambert of Saint-Omer and the Historia Brittonum”, Bulletin of the Board of Celtic Studies 26 (1975, 1974–1976): 103–122.
Dumville, David N., “The Corpus Christi ‘Nennius’”, Bulletin of the Board of Celtic Studies 25 (1972–1974): 369–380.
Dumville, David N., “A paraphrase of the Historia Brittonum: two fragments”, Bulletin of the Board of Celtic Studies 25 (1972–1974): 101–105.
Dumville, David N., “Some aspects of the chronology of the Historia Brittonum”, Bulletin of the Board of Celtic Studies 25 (May 1974, 1972–1974): 439–445.
Dumville, David N., “Biblical apocrypha and the early Irish: a preliminary investigation”, Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy 73 C (1973): 299–338.
Dumville, David N., “A new chronicle-fragment of early British history”, The English Historical Review 88 (1973): 312–314.
JSTOR: <link> Oxfordjournals.org: <link>
Dumville, David N., “Liturgical drama and panegyric responsory from the eighth century? A re-examination of the origin and contents of the ninth-century section of the Book of Cerne”, The Journal of Theological Studies 23 (October, 1972): 374–400.

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

Dumville, David N., “Political organisation in Dál Riata”, in: Edmonds, Fiona, and Paul Russell (eds.), Tome: studies in medieval Celtic history and law in honour of Thomas Charles-Edwards, Studies in Celtic History31, Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 2011. 41–52.
Dumville, David N., “Vikings in Insular chronicling”, in: Brink, Stefan, and Neil Price (eds.), The Viking world, London and New York: Routledge, 2008. 350–367.
Dumville, David N., “Charters from ‘The Book of Kells’ transcribed for James Ussher”, in: Dumville, David N., Celtic essays, 2001–2007, 2 vols, vol. 1, Aberdeen: Centre for Celtic Studies, University of Aberdeen, 2007. 233–256.
Dumville, David N., “English script in the second half of the ninth century”, in: O'Brien O'Keeffe, Katherine, and Andy Orchard (eds), Latin learning and English lore: studies in Anglo-Saxon literature for Michael Lapidge, 2 vols, vol. 1, Toronto Old English Studies, Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2005. 305–325.
Dumville, David N., “The colophon of ‘The Penitential of Uinniau’”, in: Lemoine, Louis, and Bernard Merdrignac (eds), Corona monastica: moines bretons de Landévennec. Histoire et mémoire celtiques. Mélanges offerts au père Marc Simon, Rennes: Presses universitaires de Rennes, 2004. 167–178.
Dumville, David N., “Ireland and North Britain in the earlier Middle Ages: contexts for Míniugud senchusa fher nAlban”, in: Ó Baoill, Colm, and Nancy R. McGuire (eds.), Rannsachadh na Gàidhlig 2000, Aberdeen: An Clò Gaidhealach, 2002. 185–212.
Dumville, David N., “St Cathróe of Metz and the hagiography of exoticism”, in: Carey, John, Máire Herbert, and Pádraig Ó Riain (eds.), Studies in Irish hagiography: saints and scholars, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2001. 172–188.
Dumville, David N., “The chronicle of the kings of Alba”, in: Taylor, Simon (ed.), Kings, clerics and chronicles in Scotland, 500–1297: essays in honour of Marjorie Ogilvie Anderson on the occasion of her ninetieth birthday, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2000. 73–86.
Dumville, David N., “St. Patrick in Cornwall? The origin and transmission of Vita tertia S. Patricii”, in: Klar, Kathryn A., Eve E. Sweetser, and Claire Thomas (eds.), A Celtic florilegium: studies in memory of Brendan O Hehir, Celtic Studies Publications2, Lawrence, Massachusetts: Celtic Studies Publications, 1996. 1–7.
Dumville, David N., “Historia Brittonum: an insular history from the Carolingian age”, in: Scharer, Anton, and Georg Scheibelreiter (eds.), Historiographie im frühen Mittelalter, Veröffentlichungen des Instituts für Österreichische Geschichtsforschung32, Vienna: Oldenbourg, 1994. 406–434.
Dumville, David N., “Breton and English manuscripts of Amalarius’s Liber officialis”, in: Conso, Danièle, Nicole Fick, and Bruno Poulle (eds), Mélanges François Kerlouégan, Annales littéraires de l'Université de Besançon515, Paris: Les Belles Lettres, 1994. 205–214.
Dumville, David N., “Verba militibus mittenda Corotici: an analysis of St Patrick’s tract on the crimes of Coroticus”, in: Dumville, David N., and Lesley Abrams (eds.), Saint Patrick, AD 493–1993, Studies in Celtic History13, Woodbridge: Boydell, 1993. 117–127.
Dumville, David N., “St Patrick in the Historia Brittonum: three texts”, in: Dumville, David N., and Lesley Abrams (eds.), Saint Patrick, AD 493–1993, Studies in Celtic History13, Woodbridge: Boydell, 1993. 221–232.
Dumville, David N., “Picti apostatae(que)”, in: Dumville, David N., and Lesley Abrams (eds.), Saint Patrick, AD 493–1993, Studies in Celtic History13, Woodbridge: Boydell, 1993. 129–131.
Dumville, David N., “British missionary activity in Ireland”, in: Dumville, David N., and Lesley Abrams (eds.), Saint Patrick, AD 493–1993, Studies in Celtic History13, Woodbridge: Boydell, 1993. 133–145.
Dumville, David N., “St Patrick at his ‘first synod’?”, in: Dumville, David N., and Lesley Abrams (eds.), Saint Patrick, AD 493–1993, Studies in Celtic History13, Woodbridge: Boydell, 1993. 175–178.
Dumville, David N., “The floruit of St Patrick — common and less common ground”, in: Dumville, David N., and Lesley Abrams (eds.), Saint Patrick, AD 493–1993, Studies in Celtic History13, Woodbridge: Boydell, 1993. 13–18.
Dumville, David N., “Auxilius, Iserninus, Secundinus, and Benignus”, in: Dumville, David N., and Lesley Abrams (eds.), Saint Patrick, AD 493–1993, Studies in Celtic History13, Woodbridge: Boydell, 1993. 89–105.
Dumville, David N., “St Patrick and the christianisation of Dál Riata”, in: Dumville, David N., and Lesley Abrams (eds.), Saint Patrick, AD 493–1993, Studies in Celtic History13, Woodbridge: Boydell, 1993. 183–189.
Dumville, David N., “Emain Macha, Ard Macha”, in: Dumville, David N., and Lesley Abrams (eds.), Saint Patrick, AD 493–1993, Studies in Celtic History13, Woodbridge: Boydell, 1993. 147–152.
Dumville, David N., “St Patrick, the Annales Cambriae, and St David”, in: Dumville, David N., and Lesley Abrams (eds.), Saint Patrick, AD 493–1993, Studies in Celtic History13, Woodbridge: Boydell, 1993. 279–288.
Dumville, David N., “The dating of the Tripartite Life of St Patrick”, in: Dumville, David N., and Lesley Abrams (eds.), Saint Patrick, AD 493–1993, Studies in Celtic History13, Woodbridge: Boydell, 1993. 255–258.
Dumville, David N., “Muirchú's life of St Patrick from the ‘Book of Armagh’”, in: Dumville, David N., and Lesley Abrams (eds.), Saint Patrick, AD 493–1993, Studies in Celtic History13, Woodbridge: Boydell, 1993. 203–219.
Dumville, David N., “Bibliography”, in: Dumville, David N., and Lesley Abrams (eds.), Saint Patrick, AD 493–1993, Studies in Celtic History13, Woodbridge: Boydell, 1993. 289–316.
Dumville, David N., “St Patrick and the Scandinavians of Dublin”, in: Dumville, David N., and Lesley Abrams (eds.), Saint Patrick, AD 493–1993, Studies in Celtic History13, Woodbridge: Boydell, 1993. 259–264.
Dumville, David N., “Bishop Palladius’s computus?”, in: Dumville, David N., and Lesley Abrams (eds.), Saint Patrick, AD 493–1993, Studies in Celtic History13, Woodbridge: Boydell, 1993. 85–88.
Dumville, David N., “The death-date of St Patrick”, in: Dumville, David N., and Lesley Abrams (eds.), Saint Patrick, AD 493–1993, Studies in Celtic History13, Woodbridge: Boydell, 1993. 29–33.
Dumville, David N., “Acta Palladii preserved in Patrician hagiography?”, in: Dumville, David N., and Lesley Abrams (eds.), Saint Patrick, AD 493–1993, Studies in Celtic History13, Woodbridge: Boydell, 1993. 65–84.
Dumville, David N., “Patrick Senior and Junior”, in: Dumville, David N., and Lesley Abrams (eds.), Saint Patrick, AD 493–1993, Studies in Celtic History13, Woodbridge: Boydell, 1993. 59–64.
Dumville, David N., “The afterlife of Liber angeli”, in: Dumville, David N., and Lesley Abrams (eds.), Saint Patrick, AD 493–1993, Studies in Celtic History13, Woodbridge: Boydell, 1993. 253–254.
Dumville, David N., “The form of St Patrick's Confessio in the ‘Book of Armagh’”, in: Dumville, David N., and Lesley Abrams (eds.), Saint Patrick, AD 493–1993, Studies in Celtic History13, Woodbridge: Boydell, 1993. 191–202.
Dumville, David N., “St Patrick’s missing years”, in: Dumville, David N., and Lesley Abrams (eds.), Saint Patrick, AD 493–1993, Studies in Celtic History13, Woodbridge: Boydell, 1993. 25–28.
Dumville, David N., “Church-government and the spread of Christianity in Ireland”, in: Dumville, David N., and Lesley Abrams (eds.), Saint Patrick, AD 493–1993, Studies in Celtic History13, Woodbridge: Boydell, 1993. 179–181.
Dumville, David N., “Coroticus”, in: Dumville, David N., and Lesley Abrams (eds.), Saint Patrick, AD 493–1993, Studies in Celtic History13, Woodbridge: Boydell, 1993. 107–115.
Dumville, David N., “St Patrick in an Anglo-Saxon martyrology”, in: Dumville, David N., and Lesley Abrams (eds.), Saint Patrick, AD 493–1993, Studies in Celtic History13, Woodbridge: Boydell, 1993. 243–244.
Dumville, David N., “The Armagh list of ‘coarbs of St Patrick’”, in: Dumville, David N., and Lesley Abrams (eds.), Saint Patrick, AD 493–1993, Studies in Celtic History13, Woodbridge: Boydell, 1993. 273–278.
Dumville, David N., “St Patrick and fifth-century Irish chronology: the kings”, in: Dumville, David N., and Lesley Abrams (eds.), Saint Patrick, AD 493–1993, Studies in Celtic History13, Woodbridge: Boydell, 1993. 45–57.
Dumville, David N., “William of Malmesbury’s Vita S. Patricii and his source: two lost lives of St Patrick?”, in: Dumville, David N., and Lesley Abrams (eds.), Saint Patrick, AD 493–1993, Studies in Celtic History13, Woodbridge: Boydell, 1993. 265–271.
Dumville, David N., “The date 432”, in: Dumville, David N., and Lesley Abrams (eds.), Saint Patrick, AD 493–1993, Studies in Celtic History13, Woodbridge: Boydell, 1993. 39–43.
Dumville, David N., “I: Sub-Roman Britain: history and legend” [1977], in: Dumville, David N., Histories and pseudo-histories of the insular Middle Ages, Variorum Collected Studies Series316, Aldershot: Variorum, 1990. 173–192.
Dumville, David N., “XIV: An early text of Geoffrey of Monmouth’s Historia regum Britanniae and the circulation of some Latin histories in twelfth-century Normandy” [1985], in: Dumville, David N., Histories and pseudo-histories of the insular Middle Ages, Variorum Collected Studies Series316, Aldershot: Variorum, 1990. 1–36. Reprint.
Dumville, David N., “III: The Welsh Latin annals” [1978], in: Dumville, David N., Histories and pseudo-histories of the insular Middle Ages, Variorum Collected Studies Series316, Aldershot: Variorum, 1990. 461–467.
Dumville, David N., “II: On the north British section of the Historia Brittonum” [1977], in: Dumville, David N., Histories and pseudo-histories of the insular Middle Ages, Variorum Collected Studies Series316, Aldershot: Variorum, 1990. 345–354.
Dumville, David N., “The origins of Northumbria: some aspects of the British background”, in: Bassett, Steven [ed.], The origins of Anglo-Saxon kingdoms, Studies in the Early History of Britain, Leicester: Leicester University Press, 1989. 213–222, 284–286.
Dumville, David N., “The Tribal Hidage: an introduction to its texts and their history”, in: Bassett, Steven [ed.], The origins of Anglo-Saxon kingdoms, Studies in the Early History of Britain, Leicester: Leicester University Press, 1989. 225–230, 286–287.
Dumville, David N., “Essex, Middle Anglia, and the expansion of Mercia in the south-east Midlands”, in: Bassett, Steven [ed.], The origins of Anglo-Saxon kingdoms, Studies in the Early History of Britain, Leicester: Leicester University Press, 1989. 123–140.
Dumville, David N., “Gildas and Maelgwn: problems of dating”, in: Lapidge, Michael, and David N. Dumville (eds.), Gildas: new approaches, Studies in Celtic History5, Cambridge: Boydell Press, 1984. 51–59.
Dumville, David N., “Gildas and Uinniau”, in: Lapidge, Michael, and David N. Dumville (eds.), Gildas: new approaches, Studies in Celtic History5, Cambridge: Boydell Press, 1984. 207–214.
Dumville, David N., “Some British aspects of the earliest Irish Christianity”, in: Ní Chatháin, Próinséas, and Michael Richter (eds.), Irland und Europa: die Kirche im Frühmittelalter / Ireland and Europe: the early church, Veröffentlichtungen des Europa Zentrums Tübingen. Kulturwissenschaftliche Reihe, Stuttgart: Klett-Cotta, 1984. 16–24.
Dumville, David N., “The chronology of De excidio Britanniae, Book I”, in: Lapidge, Michael, and David N. Dumville (eds.), Gildas: new approaches, Studies in Celtic History5, Cambridge: Boydell Press, 1984. 61–84.
Dumville, David N., “Latin and Irish in the Annals of Ulster, A.D. 431–1050”, in: Whitelock, Dorothy, Rosamund McKitterick, and David N. Dumville (eds.), Ireland in early medieval Europe: studies in memory of Kathleen Hughes, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1982. 320–341.
Whitelock, Dorothy, Rosamond McKitterick, and David N. Dumville, “Kathleen Winifred Hughes 1926–1977”, in: Whitelock, Dorothy, Rosamund McKitterick, and David N. Dumville (eds.), Ireland in early medieval Europe: studies in memory of Kathleen Hughes, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1982. 1–18.
Dumville, David N., “Kingship, genealogies and regnal lists”, in: Sawyer, Peter H., and Ian N. Wood (eds.), Early medieval kingship, Leeds: School of History, University of Leeds, 1977. 72–104.