Bibliography

Nancy
Edwards
s. xx / s. xxi

19 publications between 1985 and 2017 indexed
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Works authored

Edwards, Nancy, The early medieval sculpture of Wales: text, pattern and image, Kathleen Hughes Memorial Lectures 13, Cambridge: ASNC, 2014.
Edwards, Nancy, A corpus of early medieval inscribed stones and stone sculpture in Wales, vol. 3: North Wales, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2013.
Edwards, Nancy, A corpus of early medieval inscribed stones and stone sculpture in Wales, vol. 2: South-West Wales, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2007.

Works edited

Edwards, Nancy (ed.), The archaeology of the early medieval Celtic churches: proceedings of a conference on the archaeology of the early medieval Celtic churches, September 2004, The Society for Medieval Archaeology Monographs 29, Leeds, London: Maney Publishing; Routledge, 2009.  
abstract:
This volume focuses on new research on the archaeology of the early medieval Celtic churches c AD 400-1100 in Wales, Ireland, Scotland, south-west Britain and Brittany. The 21 papers use a variety of approaches to explore and analyse the archaeological evidence for the origins and development of the Church in these areas. The results of a recent multi-disciplinary research project to identify the archaeology of the early medieval church in different regions of Wales are considered alongside other new research and the discoveries made in excavations in both Wales and beyond. The papers reveal not only aspects of the archaeology of ecclesiastical landscapes with their monasteries, churches and cemeteries, but also special graves, relics, craftworking and the economy enabling both comparisons and contrasts. They likewise engage with ongoing debates concerning interpretation: historiography and the concept of the Celtic Church, conversion to Christianity, Christianization of the landscape and the changing functions and inter-relationships of sites, the development of saints cults, sacred space and pilgrimage landscapes and the origins of the monastic town.
abstract:
This volume focuses on new research on the archaeology of the early medieval Celtic churches c AD 400-1100 in Wales, Ireland, Scotland, south-west Britain and Brittany. The 21 papers use a variety of approaches to explore and analyse the archaeological evidence for the origins and development of the Church in these areas. The results of a recent multi-disciplinary research project to identify the archaeology of the early medieval church in different regions of Wales are considered alongside other new research and the discoveries made in excavations in both Wales and beyond. The papers reveal not only aspects of the archaeology of ecclesiastical landscapes with their monasteries, churches and cemeteries, but also special graves, relics, craftworking and the economy enabling both comparisons and contrasts. They likewise engage with ongoing debates concerning interpretation: historiography and the concept of the Celtic Church, conversion to Christianity, Christianization of the landscape and the changing functions and inter-relationships of sites, the development of saints cults, sacred space and pilgrimage landscapes and the origins of the monastic town.
Redknap, Mark, Nancy Edwards, Susan Youngs, Alan Lane, and Jeremy K. Knight (eds.), Pattern and purpose in Insular art. Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Insular Art held at the National Museum & Gallery, Cardiff 3–6 September 1998, Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2001.

Contributions to journals

Edwards, Nancy, “Early medieval Wales: material evidence and identity”, Studia Celtica 51 (2017): 65–87.
Edwards, Nancy, “Rethinking the Pillar of Eliseg”, The Antiquaries Journal 89 (September, 2009): 143–177.  
abstract:
The Pillar of Eliseg, originally an ambitious round-shafted cross, stands on a barrow near the Cistercian abbey of Valle Crucis. It was carved with a lengthy inscription, now illegible, but transcribed in 1696 by Edward Lhuyd. Two copies have survived, enabling a reconsideration of the significance of the inscription. This article reassesses the history of the monument, its archaeological context, form and function. The inscription shows that the cross was erected by Concenn, ruler of Powys (d ad 854), to honour his great-grandfather, Eliseg, who had expelled the Anglo-Saxons from this part of Powys. The inscription also links the rulers of Powys with the Roman usurper Magnus Maximus and the sub-Roman ruler Guarthigirn. It is argued that the inscription was intended to be read out loud and that the monument was an important piece of public propaganda erected at a time when the kingdom of Powys was severely under threat.
abstract:
The Pillar of Eliseg, originally an ambitious round-shafted cross, stands on a barrow near the Cistercian abbey of Valle Crucis. It was carved with a lengthy inscription, now illegible, but transcribed in 1696 by Edward Lhuyd. Two copies have survived, enabling a reconsideration of the significance of the inscription. This article reassesses the history of the monument, its archaeological context, form and function. The inscription shows that the cross was erected by Concenn, ruler of Powys (d ad 854), to honour his great-grandfather, Eliseg, who had expelled the Anglo-Saxons from this part of Powys. The inscription also links the rulers of Powys with the Roman usurper Magnus Maximus and the sub-Roman ruler Guarthigirn. It is argued that the inscription was intended to be read out loud and that the monument was an important piece of public propaganda erected at a time when the kingdom of Powys was severely under threat.
Ghey, Eleanor, Nancy Edwards, and Nancy Johnston, “Categorizing roundhouse settlements in Wales: a critical perspective”, Studia Celtica 42 (2008): 1–25.
Edwards, Nancy, “Edward Lhuyd and the origins of early medieval Celtic archaeology”, The Antiquaries Journal 87 (2007): 165–196.
Edwards, Nancy, “Early-medieval inscribed stones and stone sculpture in Wales: context and function”, Journal of Medieval Archaeology 45:1 (2001): 15–39.  
abstract:
Antiquaria, archaeological, topographical and place-name evidence may be used to piece together the original contexts of a significant number of early-medieval inscribed and sculptured stones in Wales and throw valuable light on their functions and on the origins and development of church sites. The differing locations of early inscribed stones are examined, including associations with prehistoric and Roman monuments as well as with cemeteries and churches, and regional differences are noted. It is suggested that, although their primary function was commemorative, some monuments also acted as symbols of landowning by secular elites. Cross-decorated stones originating c. A.D. 600 mark a change to largely anonymous grave-markers mainly associated with cemeteries and local churches, while some others are indicative of landowning by the church. Crosses and cross-slabs of the 9th to 11th centuries are clustered in and around major monasteries and regional churches. Some record the donation of land to the church while the Pillar of Eliseg functioned as a symbol of secular entitlement to land.
abstract:
Antiquaria, archaeological, topographical and place-name evidence may be used to piece together the original contexts of a significant number of early-medieval inscribed and sculptured stones in Wales and throw valuable light on their functions and on the origins and development of church sites. The differing locations of early inscribed stones are examined, including associations with prehistoric and Roman monuments as well as with cemeteries and churches, and regional differences are noted. It is suggested that, although their primary function was commemorative, some monuments also acted as symbols of landowning by secular elites. Cross-decorated stones originating c. A.D. 600 mark a change to largely anonymous grave-markers mainly associated with cemeteries and local churches, while some others are indicative of landowning by the church. Crosses and cross-slabs of the 9th to 11th centuries are clustered in and around major monasteries and regional churches. Some record the donation of land to the church while the Pillar of Eliseg functioned as a symbol of secular entitlement to land.
Edwards, Nancy, “Anglesey in the early middle ages: the archaeological evidence”, Anglesey Antiquarian Society and Field Club Transactions (1986): 19–41.
Edwards, Nancy, “The origins of the free-standing stone cross in Ireland: imitation or innovation?”, Bulletin of the Board of Celtic Studies 32 (1985): 393–410.

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

Edwards, Nancy, “Perspectives on conversion in Wales”, in: Flechner, Roy, and Máire Ní Mhaonaigh (eds), The introduction of Christianity into the early medieval Insular world: converting the Isles I, CELAMA 19, Turnhout: Brepols, 2016. 93–107.
Edwards, Nancy, “Christianising the landscape: the archaeology of the early medieval church in Wales”, in: Barnwell, P. S. (ed.), Places of worship in Britain and Ireland, 300–950, Rewley House Studies in the Historic Environment 4, Donington: Shaun Tyas, 2015. 33–55.
Edwards, Nancy, “Viking-age sculpture in north-west Wales: wealth, power, patronage and the Christian landscape”, in: Edmonds, Fiona, and Paul Russell (eds.), Tome: studies in medieval Celtic history and law in honour of Thomas Charles-Edwards, Studies in Celtic History 31, Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 2011. 73–88.
Edwards, Nancy, “The archaeology of the early medieval Celtic churches: an introduction”, in: Edwards, Nancy (ed.), The archaeology of the early medieval Celtic churches: proceedings of a conference on the archaeology of the early medieval Celtic churches, September 2004, The Society for Medieval Archaeology Monographs 29, Leeds, London: Maney Publishing; Routledge, 2009. 1–20.
Edwards, Nancy, “The early medieval sculpture of Bangor Fawr yn Arfon”, in: Meek, Marion (ed.), The modern traveller to our past: Festschrift in honour of Ann Hamlin, DPK, 2006. 105–111.
Edwards, Nancy, “The archaeology of early medieval Ireland, c.400–1169: settlement and economy”, in: Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí [ed.], A new history of Ireland, vol. 1: Prehistoric and early Ireland, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005. 235–300.
Edwards, Nancy, “Celtic saints and early medieval archaeology”, in: Thacker, Alan, and Richard Sharpe (eds.), Local saints and local churches in the early medieval West, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002. 225–265.