Bibliography

J. Wyn
Evans

4 publications between 2003 and 2009 indexed
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Works edited

Evans, J. Wyn, and Jonathan M. Wooding (eds.), St David of Wales: cult, church and nation, Studies in Celtic History24, Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 2007.

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

Silvester, Robert J., and J. Wyn Evans, “Identifying the mother churches of north-east Wales”, in: Edwards, Nancy (ed.), The archaeology of the early medieval Celtic churches: proceedings of a conference on the archaeology of the early medieval Celtic churches, September 2004, The Society for Medieval Archaeology Monographs 29, Leeds, London: Maney Publishing; Routledge, 2009. 21–40.  
abstract:
This chapter outlines attributes of mother churches primarily derived from documentary sources. It examines the physical manifestation of the mother churches in the landscape of north-east Wales. Both really deserve more extensive consideration: the former because it is difficult to do justice to such a complex issue in a short space; the latter because, though the discussion ranges across the historical counties of Denbighshire, Flintshire and Montgomeryshire. The ecclesiastical landscape of Inishmurray, Co Sligo, is in many respects unique in the Irish archaeological record. Inishmurray is said to be the principal monastery of Molaise, son of St Declan, but it is very likely that this shadowy figure is a localization of the cult of Molaise son of Nadfraich, founder of Devenish, Co Fermanagh, whose death is recorded in the Annals of Ulster under 564 and 571. The pilgrimage on Inishmurray as practised until exhibits defining characteristics of penitential processions, including fasting and walking barefoot.
abstract:
This chapter outlines attributes of mother churches primarily derived from documentary sources. It examines the physical manifestation of the mother churches in the landscape of north-east Wales. Both really deserve more extensive consideration: the former because it is difficult to do justice to such a complex issue in a short space; the latter because, though the discussion ranges across the historical counties of Denbighshire, Flintshire and Montgomeryshire. The ecclesiastical landscape of Inishmurray, Co Sligo, is in many respects unique in the Irish archaeological record. Inishmurray is said to be the principal monastery of Molaise, son of St Declan, but it is very likely that this shadowy figure is a localization of the cult of Molaise son of Nadfraich, founder of Devenish, Co Fermanagh, whose death is recorded in the Annals of Ulster under 564 and 571. The pilgrimage on Inishmurray as practised until exhibits defining characteristics of penitential processions, including fasting and walking barefoot.
Evans, J. Wyn, “Transition and survival: St David and St Davids Cathedral”, in: Evans, J. Wyn, and Jonathan M. Wooding (eds.), St David of Wales: cult, church and nation, Studies in Celtic History24, Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 2007. 20–40.
Evans, J. Wyn, “St David and St Davids: some observations on the cult, site and buildings”, in: Cartwright, Jane [ed.], Celtic hagiography and saints’ cults, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2003. 10–25.