Bibliography

Anthony J.
Forte

4 publications between 1991 and 2018 indexed
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Works authored

Forte, Anthony J., Friguli commentarius in evangelium secundum Matthaeum, Rarissima Mediaevalia: Opera Latina 6, Münster: Aschendorff Verlag, 2018.  
abstract:

Quedlinburg 127, a Carolingian manuscript now conserved in the University Library at Halle an der Saale, preserves a copy of a commentary on the Gospel of Matthew that, according to the flyleaf, was written by a certain “Fribolus.” It is unclear who this Fribolus or Frigolus was. If the name “Friboli” is indeed that of a real person, might he be identical with the “Figulus” mentioned together with Jerome, Augustine, Gregory and Bede, by the ninth-century author Smaragdus of Saint-Mihiel in his Collectiones epistolarum et euangeliorum? In addition to these patristic authorities, other writers such as Isidore and Fortunatianus, Bishop of Aquileia, were also used by our author. The scope of Frigulus’ commentary was to provide more than a collection of excerpts. What seems to be original is the way in which Frigulus arranged the material he appropriated from so many different authors. Not only did he transmit a well-known exegesis of the text from the patristic sources available to him, but immediately following these often literal interpretations he also provided glosses in order to give a coherent structure to his allegorical commentary. By doing this, he sought to include a short reflection on almost every element in the biblical narrative.

abstract:

Quedlinburg 127, a Carolingian manuscript now conserved in the University Library at Halle an der Saale, preserves a copy of a commentary on the Gospel of Matthew that, according to the flyleaf, was written by a certain “Fribolus.” It is unclear who this Fribolus or Frigolus was. If the name “Friboli” is indeed that of a real person, might he be identical with the “Figulus” mentioned together with Jerome, Augustine, Gregory and Bede, by the ninth-century author Smaragdus of Saint-Mihiel in his Collectiones epistolarum et euangeliorum? In addition to these patristic authorities, other writers such as Isidore and Fortunatianus, Bishop of Aquileia, were also used by our author. The scope of Frigulus’ commentary was to provide more than a collection of excerpts. What seems to be original is the way in which Frigulus arranged the material he appropriated from so many different authors. Not only did he transmit a well-known exegesis of the text from the patristic sources available to him, but immediately following these often literal interpretations he also provided glosses in order to give a coherent structure to his allegorical commentary. By doing this, he sought to include a short reflection on almost every element in the biblical narrative.

Theses

Forte, Anthony J., “A critical edition of a Hiberno-Latin commentary on Matthew 1-8 (Codex Vindobonensis 940)”, unpublished PhD thesis: University of California, Los Angeles, 1991.


Contributions to journals

Forte, Anthony J., “Bengt Löfstedt’s Fragmente eines Matthäus-Kommentars: reflections and addenda”, Sacris Erudiri 42 (2003): 327–367.  
abstract:
Bengt Löfstedt's Fragmente eines Matthäus-Kommentars, an editio princeps of two bifolia housed in Tokyo and in London, has allowed the author to compare the fragments edited by Löfstedt with parallels from Frigulus' Matthew commentary, Qu. Cod. 127, and with another Matthew commentary, Orl. (65) 62. The author has attempted not only to improve upon Löfstedt's edition by resolving some of the lacunae in the fragments, and to add various patristic and biblical sources and/or parallels to Löfstedt's apparatus, but more importantly has suggested by his study that the two bifolia edited by B. Löfstedt form part of a series of recensiones of a major commentary on Matthew's Gospel.
abstract:
Bengt Löfstedt's Fragmente eines Matthäus-Kommentars, an editio princeps of two bifolia housed in Tokyo and in London, has allowed the author to compare the fragments edited by Löfstedt with parallels from Frigulus' Matthew commentary, Qu. Cod. 127, and with another Matthew commentary, Orl. (65) 62. The author has attempted not only to improve upon Löfstedt's edition by resolving some of the lacunae in the fragments, and to add various patristic and biblical sources and/or parallels to Löfstedt's apparatus, but more importantly has suggested by his study that the two bifolia edited by B. Löfstedt form part of a series of recensiones of a major commentary on Matthew's Gospel.

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

Forte, Anthony J., “Some philological observations on Codex Vindobonensis 940”, in: O'Loughlin, Thomas (ed.), The Scriptures and early medieval Ireland: proceedings of the 1993 Conference of the Society for Hiberno-Latin Studies on Early Irish Exegesis and Homilectics, Instrumenta Patristica 31, Steenbrugge, Turnhout: In Abbatia S. Petri; Brepols, 1999. 109–115.