Bibliography

Jessica
Hemming

5 publications between 1996 and 2017 indexed
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Contributions to journals

Hemming, Jessica, “Pale horses and green dawns: elusive colour terms in early Welsh heroic poetry”, North American Journal of Celtic Studies 1:2 (November, 2017): 189–223. 
abstract:
This paper analyses the polysemy of the colour terms blawr, can, glas, gwelw, and gwyrdd in early Welsh poetry. It uses recent theoretical work on the historical semantics of colour terms in conjunction with cross-cultural anthropological colour studies to argue for a multisensory approach to understanding the Middle Welsh colour system.
abstract:
This paper analyses the polysemy of the colour terms blawr, can, glas, gwelw, and gwyrdd in early Welsh poetry. It uses recent theoretical work on the historical semantics of colour terms in conjunction with cross-cultural anthropological colour studies to argue for a multisensory approach to understanding the Middle Welsh colour system.
Hemming, Jessica, “‘I could love a man with those three colours’: gazing and the tricoloured beloved”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 68 (Winter, 2014): 51–67.
Hemming, Jessica, “Bos primigenius in Britain: or, why do fairy cows have red ears?”, Folklore 113:1 (April, 2002): 71–82. 
abstract:
Many medievalists, especially scholars of Celtic literature, have observed that red-eared white animals are associated with fairies and other supernatural beings. What has not been satisfactorily answered is why this should be so. This article offers a possible explanation, suggesting that this widespread phenomenon is rooted not in fantasy but in zoology.
abstract:
Many medievalists, especially scholars of Celtic literature, have observed that red-eared white animals are associated with fairies and other supernatural beings. What has not been satisfactorily answered is why this should be so. This article offers a possible explanation, suggesting that this widespread phenomenon is rooted not in fantasy but in zoology.
Hemming, Jessica, “Ami and Amile: a partial source for Pwyll?”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 32 (Winter, 1996): 57–93.

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

Hemming, Jessica, “Ancient tradition or authorial invention? The ‘mythological’ names in the Four Branches”, in: Nagy, Joseph Falaky [ed.], Myth in Celtic literatures, CSANA Yearbook 6, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2007. 83–104.