Bibliography

Barbara
Hillers

12 publications between 1992 and 2019 indexed
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Works edited

Carey, John, Ilona Tuomi, Barbara Hillers, and Ciarán Ó Gealbhain (eds), Charms, charmers and charming in Ireland: from the medieval to the modern, New Approaches to Celtic Religion and Mythology, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2019.  
abstract:
This is the first book to examine the full range of the evidence for Irish charms, from medieval to modern times. As Ireland has one of the oldest literatures in Europe, and also one of the most comprehensively recorded folklore traditions, it affords a uniquely rich body of evidence for such an investigation. The collection includes surveys of broad aspects of the subject (charm scholarship, charms in medieval tales, modern narrative charms, nineteenth-century charm documentation); dossiers of the evidence for specific charms (a headache charm, a nightmare charm, charms against bleeding); a study comparing the curses of saints with those of poets; and an account of a newly discovered manuscript of a toothache charm. The practices of a contemporary healer are described on the basis of recent fieldwork, and the connection between charms and storytelling is foregrounded in chapters on the textual amulet known as the Leabhar Eoin, on the belief that witches steal butter, and on the nature of the belief that effects supernatural cures.
abstract:
This is the first book to examine the full range of the evidence for Irish charms, from medieval to modern times. As Ireland has one of the oldest literatures in Europe, and also one of the most comprehensively recorded folklore traditions, it affords a uniquely rich body of evidence for such an investigation. The collection includes surveys of broad aspects of the subject (charm scholarship, charms in medieval tales, modern narrative charms, nineteenth-century charm documentation); dossiers of the evidence for specific charms (a headache charm, a nightmare charm, charms against bleeding); a study comparing the curses of saints with those of poets; and an account of a newly discovered manuscript of a toothache charm. The practices of a contemporary healer are described on the basis of recent fieldwork, and the connection between charms and storytelling is foregrounded in chapters on the textual amulet known as the Leabhar Eoin, on the belief that witches steal butter, and on the nature of the belief that effects supernatural cures.

Contributions to journals

Sumner, Natasha, Barbara Hillers, and Catherine McKenna, “A night of storytelling and years in the ‘Z-Closet’: the re-discovery and restoration of Oidhche sheanchais, Robert Flaherty's ‘lost’ Irish folklore film”, Folklore: The Journal of the Folklore Society 126:1 (March, 2015): 1–19.  
abstract:
This article describes the acquisition by Harvard University's library of a print of Robert Flaherty's short 1934 film in the Irish language, Oidhche Sheanchais (A night of storytelling), the apparent disappearance of all copies of the film after 1943, the rediscovery of Harvard's copy in 2012, and the restoration process that has ensued. The authors discuss the song and the maritime legend at the heart of the film, as well as the film's significance as an early ethnodocumentary. The Appendix provides, for the first time, the text of the film's soundtrack, with full English translation.
abstract:
This article describes the acquisition by Harvard University's library of a print of Robert Flaherty's short 1934 film in the Irish language, Oidhche Sheanchais (A night of storytelling), the apparent disappearance of all copies of the film after 1943, the rediscovery of Harvard's copy in 2012, and the restoration process that has ensued. The authors discuss the song and the maritime legend at the heart of the film, as well as the film's significance as an early ethnodocumentary. The Appendix provides, for the first time, the text of the film's soundtrack, with full English translation.
Hillers, Barbara, “In fer fíamach fírglic: Ulysses in medieval Irish literature”, Proceedings of the Harvard Celtic Colloquium 16–17 (2003): 15–38.
Hillers, Barbara, “Ulysses and the Judge of Truth: sources and meanings in the Irish Odyssey”, Peritia 13 (1999): 194–223.
Hillers, Barbara, “The abbot of Druimenaig: genderbending in Gaelic tradition”, Proceedings of the Harvard Celtic Colloquium 15 (1995): 175–197.

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

Hillers, Barbara, “The medieval Irish Wandering of Ulysses between literacy and orality”, in: O'Connor, Ralph [ed.], Classical literature and learning in medieval Irish narrative, Studies in Celtic History 34, Cambridge: D. S. Brewer, 2014. viii + 244 pp. 83–98.
Hillers, Barbara Lisa, “The reception and assimilation of continental literature”, in: Wright, Julia M. [ed.], A companion to Irish literature, vol. 1, Blackwell Companions to Literature and Culture, Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2010. 39–56.
Hillers, Barbara, “Poet or magician: Mac Mhuirich Mór in oral tradition”, in: Nagy, Joseph Falaky, and Leslie Ellen Jones (eds.), Heroic poets and poetic heroes in Celtic tradition. A Festschrift for Patrick K. Ford, CSANA Yearbook 3–4, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2005. 141–157.
Hillers, Barbara, “Sgél in Mínaduir: Dädalus und der Minotaurus in Irland”, in: Poppe, Erich, and Hildegard L. C. Tristram (eds.), Übersetzung, Adaptation und Akkulturation im insularen Mittelalter, Studien und Texte zur Keltologie 4, Münster: Nodus Publikationen, 1999. 131–144.
Hillers, Barbara, “The heroes of the Ulster cycle”, in: Mallory, James P., and Gerard Stockman (eds.), Ulidia: proceedings of the First International Conference on the Ulster Cycle of Tales, Belfast and Emain Macha, 8–12 April 1994, Belfast: December, 1994. 99–106.