Bibliography

Bart
Jaski
s. xx / s. xxi

89 publications between 1995 and 2018 indexed
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Works authored

Jaski, Bart, and Daniel Mc Carthy, The Annals of Roscrea: a diplomatic edition, Roscrea: Roscrea People and Roscrea Heritage Society, 2012. xxxvi + 66 pp.
Jaski, Bart, and Daniel Mc Carthy, A facsimile edition of the Annals of Roscrea, Online: School of Computer Science and Statistics, Trinity College. Word 97 document. URL: <http://www.scss.tcd.ie/misc/kronos/editions/AR_portal.htm>. 
abstract:
The Irish chronicle known to modern scholarship as the ‘Annals of Roscrea’ is found only in the manuscript Brussels, Bibliothèque Royale 5301-20 pp. 97−161. It was first registered in print in the comprehensive catalogue of the manuscripts in the Burgundian Library at Brussels published in 1842, and an edition was published by Dermot Gleeson and Seán Mac Airt in 1959. Recent research has shown that the principal scribe, the Franciscan friar Fr Brendan O’Conor, transcribed his source, ‘mutila Historia D. Cantwelij’, in two successive phases and then in a third phase it was annotated and indexed by his fellow Franciscan Fr Thomas O’Sheerin. This research has also shown that the edition of Gleeson and Mac Airt is incomplete, having omitted the pre-Patrician section of the chronicle. Hence this, the first full edition of the work, has been prepared in facsimile form so as to make clear the successive phases of compilation of the text, to provide an accurate account of its orthography, to identify the relationship of its entries to those of other chronicles, and to furnish an AD chronology consistent with the other Clonmacnoise group chronicles.
comments: 1. A 30-page introduction describing the only manuscript of the Annals of Roscrea, namely [[Brussels, Bibliothèque Royale de Belgique, MS 5301-5320

|Brussels, Bibliothèque Royale 5301-20]], followed by an account of the principles used in the compilation of the facsimile edition.

2. The facsimile edition formatted as a 65-page A4 document, representing a page-by-page facsimile of the 65 pages of MS Brussels, Bibliothèque Royale 5301-20, pp. 97-161.
abstract:
The Irish chronicle known to modern scholarship as the ‘Annals of Roscrea’ is found only in the manuscript Brussels, Bibliothèque Royale 5301-20 pp. 97−161. It was first registered in print in the comprehensive catalogue of the manuscripts in the Burgundian Library at Brussels published in 1842, and an edition was published by Dermot Gleeson and Seán Mac Airt in 1959. Recent research has shown that the principal scribe, the Franciscan friar Fr Brendan O’Conor, transcribed his source, ‘mutila Historia D. Cantwelij’, in two successive phases and then in a third phase it was annotated and indexed by his fellow Franciscan Fr Thomas O’Sheerin. This research has also shown that the edition of Gleeson and Mac Airt is incomplete, having omitted the pre-Patrician section of the chronicle. Hence this, the first full edition of the work, has been prepared in facsimile form so as to make clear the successive phases of compilation of the text, to provide an accurate account of its orthography, to identify the relationship of its entries to those of other chronicles, and to furnish an AD chronology consistent with the other Clonmacnoise group chronicles.
comments: 1. A 30-page introduction describing the only manuscript of the Annals of Roscrea, namely [[Brussels, Bibliothèque Royale de Belgique, MS 5301-5320

|Brussels, Bibliothèque Royale 5301-20]], followed by an account of the principles used in the compilation of the facsimile edition.

2. The facsimile edition formatted as a 65-page A4 document, representing a page-by-page facsimile of the 65 pages of MS Brussels, Bibliothèque Royale 5301-20, pp. 97-161.
Jaski, Bart, Early Irish kingship and succession, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2000.  
Early medieval Ireland was politically fragmented, with a multitude of lordships and kingships ruled by dynasties of which many were genealogically inter-related. This book begins by discussing the political power of the Irish lords and kings over their subjects, their roles as mediators between natural and divine forces and their position as rulers over their subjects. It then moves on to a detailed analysis of the rule of succession in early Ireland. A lord or king had to be qualified for his office, and for this many considerations were taken into account, such as his pedigree, the status of his mother, his behaviour and his physical appearance. This is widely evidenced in legal material, saga literature, annals and other sources, and the author sets these notions in a wider context of various aspects of Irish political and social life, such as the division of the inheritance, loss of noble and royal status, clientship and suretyship. The meaning of the titles rígdamna and the office of tánaise ríg are also examined. The Irish custom of succession forms the background to the tendency of close and distant relatives to compete for power and of the ruling dynasties to expand and fragment. It also explains why it was so difficult for one dynasty to become permanently paramount in Ireland. The book concludes with a discussion of the nature of the kingship of Tara.
Early medieval Ireland was politically fragmented, with a multitude of lordships and kingships ruled by dynasties of which many were genealogically inter-related. This book begins by discussing the political power of the Irish lords and kings over their subjects, their roles as mediators between natural and divine forces and their position as rulers over their subjects. It then moves on to a detailed analysis of the rule of succession in early Ireland. A lord or king had to be qualified for his office, and for this many considerations were taken into account, such as his pedigree, the status of his mother, his behaviour and his physical appearance. This is widely evidenced in legal material, saga literature, annals and other sources, and the author sets these notions in a wider context of various aspects of Irish political and social life, such as the division of the inheritance, loss of noble and royal status, clientship and suretyship. The meaning of the titles rígdamna and the office of tánaise ríg are also examined. The Irish custom of succession forms the background to the tendency of close and distant relatives to compete for power and of the ruling dynasties to expand and fragment. It also explains why it was so difficult for one dynasty to become permanently paramount in Ireland. The book concludes with a discussion of the nature of the kingship of Tara.

Works edited

Egmond, M. van, Bart Jaski, and H. Mulder (eds.), Bijzonder onderzoek: een ontdekkingsreis door de Bijzondere Collecties van de Universiteitsbibliotheek Utrecht, Utrecht: University Library, 2009.
Genee, Inge, Bart Jaski, and Bernadette Smelik (eds.), Arthur, Brigit, Conn, Deirdre... Verhaal, taal en recht in de Keltische wereld. Liber amicorum voor Leni van Strien-Gerritsen, Nijmegen: Stichting Uitgeverij de Keltische Draak, 2003.

Contributions to journals

Bart Jaski, “Schuld en boete [Review of: Rob Meens, Penance in medieval Europe, 600–1200 (2014)]”, in: Kelten: Mededelingen van de Stichting A. G. van Hamel voor Keltische Studies 65 (2015): 12.
Jaski, Bart, “The oldest datings of the Utrecht psalter: rudimentary palaeography in the early seventeenth century”, Quaerendo 45:1-2 (2015): 125–143.  
abstract:
In the 1620s two attempts were made to date the Utrecht Psalter (c.830, in or around Reims): by its owner Robert Cotton and by the theologian James Ussher. Their results offer an insight into how a collector and a scholar practised palaeography before this became a modern study in the decades around 1700. The Utrecht Psalter, as well as the Cotton Genesis and other manuscripts, were dated in relation to their script, decoration and content. This case study underlines that the history of palaeography and codicology before Mabillon and Montfaucon is worth studying, not only in its own right, but also with regard to the development of humanism and its scholarly networks.
abstract:
In the 1620s two attempts were made to date the Utrecht Psalter (c.830, in or around Reims): by its owner Robert Cotton and by the theologian James Ussher. Their results offer an insight into how a collector and a scholar practised palaeography before this became a modern study in the decades around 1700. The Utrecht Psalter, as well as the Cotton Genesis and other manuscripts, were dated in relation to their script, decoration and content. This case study underlines that the history of palaeography and codicology before Mabillon and Montfaucon is worth studying, not only in its own right, but also with regard to the development of humanism and its scholarly networks.
Bart Jaski, “Sterrenparade [Review of: Mary Kelly (ed.) • Charles Doherty (ed.), Music and the stars: mathematics in medieval Ireland (2013)]”, in: Kelten: Mededelingen van de Stichting A. G. van Hamel voor Keltische Studies 63 (2014): 8–9.
Bart Jaski, “Van Hamel-lezingen 2013: avonturen met (de) Welsh”, in: Kelten: Mededelingen van de Stichting A. G. van Hamel voor Keltische Studies 62 (2014): 18.
Bart Jaski, “Britse degelijkheid [Review of: Richard Gameson (ed.), The Cambridge history of the book in Britain: c. 400-1100, vol. 1 (2012)]”, in: Kelten: Mededelingen van de Stichting A. G. van Hamel voor Keltische Studies 61 (2014): 20.
Bart Jaski, “Clontarf 1014: hoge-koningen versus vazallen? [Review of: Darren McGettigan, The battle of Clontarf, Good Friday, 1014 (2013)]”, in: Kelten: Mededelingen van de Stichting A. G. van Hamel voor Keltische Studies 62 (2014): 12–13.
Bart Jaski, “Schotland en Ierland in Blaeu’s Atlas maior”, in: Kelten: Mededelingen van de Stichting A. G. van Hamel voor Keltische Studies 58 (2013): 7–9.
Jaski, Bart, “Een nieuwe editie van de Annalen van Roscrea”, Kelten: Mededelingen van de Stichting A. G. van Hamel voor Keltische Studies 55 (August, 2012): 5–8.
Bart Jaski, “De archieven van en over Whitley Stokes [Review of: Elizabeth Boyle (ed.) • Paul Russell (ed.), The tripartite life of Whitley Stokes (1830-1909) (2011)]”, in: Kelten: Mededelingen van de Stichting A. G. van Hamel voor Keltische Studies 53 (2012): 14.
Jaski, Bart, “Gevierde meesters [Review of: Cunningham, Bernadette, The Annals of the Four Masters: Irish history, kingship and society in the early seventeenth century, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2010]”, Kelten: Mededelingen van de Stichting A. G. van Hamel voor Keltische Studies 49 (February, 2011): 11–12.
Jaski, Bart, “[Review of: Bhreathnach, Edel (ed.), The kingship and landscape of Tara, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2005]”, Peritia 20 (2008): 387–394.
Jaski, Bart, “Early Irish examples of the name ‘Arthur’”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 56 (2007): 89–105.
Jaski, Bart, “[Review of: Clerinx, Herman, Kelten en de Lage Landen: vechten om het beste deel, Leuven: Davidsfonds, 2005]”, Tijdschrift voor Geschiedenis 119 (2006): 402–403.
Jaski, Bart, “[Review of: FitzPatrick, Elizabeth, Royal inauguration in Gaelic Ireland c. 1100-1600: a cultural landscape study, Studies in Celtic History 22, Woodbridge, Suffolk: Boydell Press, 2004]”, Speculum 81:3 (2006): 844–845.
Jaski, Bart, “The genealogical section of the Psalter of Cashel”, Peritia 17–18 (2003–2004): 295–337.
Jaski, Bart, “De Keltische kalender”, Vakidioot 2004–2005:1 (October, 2004): 3–7.
Jaski, Bart, “‘We are of the Greeks in our origin’: new perspectives on the Irish origin legend”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 46 (Winter, 2003): 1–53.
Jaski, Bart, “Cú Chuimne, Ruben and the compilation of the Collectio Canonum Hibernensis”, Peritia 14 (2000): 51–69.  
abstract:

The compilation of recension A of the Collectio canonum Hibernensis has been associated with Cú Chuimne of Iona and Ruben of Dairinis. Ruben may have been son of Broccán son of Connad of Tech Taille, who can be identified as a scholar mentioned in Commentarius in epistolas Catholicas and as Braccán of the Cíarraige in the genealogies. He belonged to the community of Munnu which maintained close bonds with that of Columba. Dairinis played a formative role in the development of the Céli dé. Cú Chuimne and Ruben cannot simply be regarded as Romani, and CCH is not simply a Romani text. Its form suggests that CCH was a practical guide for superiors in dealing with those under their authority, in spiritual and worldly matters. CCH complements native Irish law, with which it has close affinities but its direct influence on native Irish law still remains difficult to establish, and in any case this may not reflect the intentions of its compilers.

abstract:

The compilation of recension A of the Collectio canonum Hibernensis has been associated with Cú Chuimne of Iona and Ruben of Dairinis. Ruben may have been son of Broccán son of Connad of Tech Taille, who can be identified as a scholar mentioned in Commentarius in epistolas Catholicas and as Braccán of the Cíarraige in the genealogies. He belonged to the community of Munnu which maintained close bonds with that of Columba. Dairinis played a formative role in the development of the Céli dé. Cú Chuimne and Ruben cannot simply be regarded as Romani, and CCH is not simply a Romani text. Its form suggests that CCH was a practical guide for superiors in dealing with those under their authority, in spiritual and worldly matters. CCH complements native Irish law, with which it has close affinities but its direct influence on native Irish law still remains difficult to establish, and in any case this may not reflect the intentions of its compilers.

Jaski, Bart, “Dood en begraven [Review of: Fry, Susan, Burial in medieval Ireland 900–1500: a review of the written sources, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 1999]”, Tijdschrift voor Geschiedenis 113 (2000): 404–406.
Jaski, Bart, “Cú Chulainn, gormac and dalta of the Ulstermen”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 37 (Summer, 1999): 1–31.
Jaski, Bart, “Druim Cett revisited”, Peritia 12 (1998): 340–350.
Jaski, Bart, “Early medieval Irish kingship and the Old Testament”, Early Medieval Europe 7 (1998): 329–344.
Jaski, Bart, “[Review of: Körntgen, Ludger, Studien zu den Quellen der frühmittelalterlichen Bußbücher, Quellen und Forschungen zum Recht im Mittelalter 7, Sigmaringen: Thorbecke, 1993]”, Peritia 11 (1997): 396–397.
Jaski, Bart, “Additional notes to the Annals of Ulster”, Ériu 48 (1997): 103–152.
Jaski, Bart, “[Review of: Bhreathnach, Edel, Tara: a select bibliography, Discovery Programme Report 3, Dublin: Royal Irish Academy, 1995]”, Peritia 11 (1997): 428–431.
Jaski, Bart, “[Review of: Etchingham, Colmán, Viking raids on Irish church settlements in the ninth century: a reconsideration of the annals, Maynooth Monographs, Series Minor 1, Maynooth: St Patrick's College, Maynooth Department of Old and Middle Irish, 1996]”, Peritia 11 (1997): 449–451.
Jaski, Bart, “The Vikings and the kingship of Tara”, Peritia 9 (1995): 310–351.

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

Jaski, Bart, “The (legendary) rise of Dál Cais”, in: Duffy, Seán (ed.), Medieval Dublin XVI: proceedings of Clontarf 1014–2014: national conference marking the millennium of the Battle of Clontarf, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2017. 15–61.
Jaski, Bart, “Wederzijdse beïnvloeding”, in: Leeflang, Micha, and Kees van Schooten (eds), Heilig schrift: Tanach, Bijbel, Koran, Zwolle, Utrecht, 2016. 133–140.
Jaski, Bart, “Christelijke kalligrafie?”, in: Leeflang, Micha, and Kees van Schooten (eds), Heilig schrift: Tanach, Bijbel, Koran, Zwolle, Utrecht, 2016. 108–109.
Jaski, Bart, “The strange case of Ailill mac Mágach and Cet mac Mátach”, in: Purcell, Emer, Paul MacCotter, Julianne Nyhan, and John Sheehan (eds), Clerics, kings and vikings: essays on medieval Ireland in honour of Donnchadh Ó Corráin, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2015. 440–451.
Jaski, Bart, “Medieval Irish genealogies and genetics”, in: Duffy, Seán (ed.), Princes, prelates and poets in medieval Ireland: essays in honour of Katharine Simms, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2013. 3–17.
Jaski, Bart, “A supplement to the bibliography of Fergus Kelly, A guide to early Irish law”, Groenewegen, Dennis [project director], CODECS: online database and e-resources for Celtic studies, Online: Stichting A. G. van Hamel voor Keltische Studies. URL: <https://www.vanhamel.nl/codecs/Supplement_to_GTEIL>. 
A supplement to the bibliography of Fergus Kelly, A guide to early Irish law (1988). The supplement supersedes an earlier version which was first published on the website of Utrecht University.
A supplement to the bibliography of Fergus Kelly, A guide to early Irish law (1988). The supplement supersedes an earlier version which was first published on the website of Utrecht University.
Jaski, Bart, “King and household in early medieval Ireland”, in: Hudson, Benjamin T. [ed.], Familia and household in the medieval Atlantic province, Penn State Medieval Studies 3, Tempe, Arizona: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies Publications, 2011. 89–122.
Jaski, Bart, “[Various contributions]”, in: Dunphy, R. G. [ed.], The encyclopedia of the medieval chronicle, 2 vols, Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2010. Vol. 1; 2: [Various].
includes: Bart Jaski, ‘Cogad Gáedel re Gallaib’, vol. 1 • Bart Jaski, ‘Do fhlaithusaib Hérenn’, vol. 1 • Bart Jaski, ‘Sex aetates mundi’, vol. 2
Jaski, Bart, “The Irish origin legend: seven unexplored sources”, in: Carey, John [ed.], Lebor gabála Érenn: textual history and pseudohistory, Irish Texts Society, Subsidiary Series 20, Dublin: Irish Texts Society, 2009. 48–75.
Jaski, Bart, “Handschriften van de heiligen: van Willibrord tot Bernulfus”, in: Leeflang, Micha, and Kees van Schooten (eds.), Beeldschone boeken. De Middeleeuwen in goud en inkt, Zwolle, Waanders, and Utrecht: Museum Catharijneconvent, 2009. 18–31, 133 (English summary).
Jaski, Bart, “Van schut tot schat: onderzoek naar handschriftfragmenten”, in: Egmond, M. van, Bart Jaski, and H. Mulder (eds.), Bijzonder onderzoek: een ontdekkingsreis door de Bijzondere Collecties van de Universiteitsbibliotheek Utrecht, Utrecht: University Library, 2009. 32–39.
Jaski, Bart, “[Various contributions]”, in: Snyder, Christopher [ed.], The early peoples of Britain and Ireland: an encyclopedia, 2 vols, Oxford and Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood Press, 2008. Vol. 1; 2: [Various].
includes: Bart Jaski, ‘Cú Chulainn’ • Bart Jaski, ‘Éoganachta’ • Bart Jaski, ‘Féni’ • Bart Jaski, ‘Gaels’ • Bart Jaski, ‘Lebor Gabála’ • Bart Jaski, ‘O’Connor kings of Connacht’ • Bart Jaski, ‘tanistry’ • Bart Jaski, ‘Túatha Dé Danann’ • Bart Jaski, ‘Uí Néill
Jaski, Bart, “Aeneas and Fénius: a classical case of mistaken identity”, in: Corradini, Richard, Rob Meens, Christina Pössel, and Philip Shaw (eds.), Texts and identities in the early Middle Ages, Vienna: Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 2006. 17–33.
Jaski, Bart, “Reconstructing Cáin Fhuithirbe”, Utrecht University homepage, Online: Utrecht University.  
abstract:
The early Irish law tract Cáin Fhuithirbe (ca. 680) is preserved in five fragments which contain glossed excerpts of the original text. This article is a preliminary attempt to reconstruct, as far as possible, the sequence of the original text by comparing the five extant fragments. The reconstructed text is given without glosses, translation or analysis. In one manuscript version of the tract, TCD 1363 (olim H. 4. 22), a page is missing which has not been noted previously.
Academia.edu – 2017 version, with minor revisions: <link>
abstract:
The early Irish law tract Cáin Fhuithirbe (ca. 680) is preserved in five fragments which contain glossed excerpts of the original text. This article is a preliminary attempt to reconstruct, as far as possible, the sequence of the original text by comparing the five extant fragments. The reconstructed text is given without glosses, translation or analysis. In one manuscript version of the tract, TCD 1363 (olim H. 4. 22), a page is missing which has not been noted previously.
Jaski, Bart, “Brian Boru; kings and kingship; Máel-Sechnaill I; Máel-Sechnaill II”, in: Duffy, Seán [ed.], Medieval Ireland: an encyclopedia, New York and London: Routledge, 2005. [Various].
includes: Bart Jaski, ‘Brian Boru’ • Bart Jaski, ‘kings and kingship’ • Bart Jaski, ‘Máel-Sechnaill I’ • Bart Jaski, ‘Máel-Sechnaill II
Jaski, Bart [ed. and tr.], “Cáin lánamna ‘The regulation of couples’. Text and translation of the early Irish law-tract on marriage and sexual relationships”, Utrecht University homepage, Online: Utrecht University.
Jaski, Bart, “A supplement to the bibliography of Fergus Kelly, A guide to early Irish law”, Utrecht University homepage, Online: Utrecht University.
Jaski, Bart, “Leni van Strien-Gerritsen – een curriculum vitae”, in: Genee, Inge, Bart Jaski, and Bernadette Smelik (eds.), Arthur, Brigit, Conn, Deirdre... Verhaal, taal en recht in de Keltische wereld. Liber amicorum voor Leni van Strien-Gerritsen, Nijmegen: Stichting Uitgeverij de Keltische Draak, 2003. 12–13.
Jaski, Bart, “[Various contributions]”, in: Lalor, Brian [ed.], The encyclopaedia of Ireland, Dublin: Gill & Macmillan, 2003. [Various].
includes: Bart Jaski, ‘aonach’ • Bart Jaski, ‘divorce, medieval’ • Bart Jaski, ‘high-kingship’ • Bart Jaski, ‘kingship’ • Bart Jaski, ‘marriage, early Irish’ • Bart Jaski, ‘Niall of the Nine Hostages’ • Bart Jaski, ‘tánaiste’ • Bart Jaski, ‘Tara, kingship of’ • Bart Jaski, ‘Vikings’ • Bart Jaski, ‘women, status of, 800-1200
Jaski, Bart, “Opsporing verzocht! Conn van de Honderd Verdragen en het raadsel van de opgeloste wettekst”, in: Genee, Inge, Bart Jaski, and Bernadette Smelik (eds.), Arthur, Brigit, Conn, Deirdre... Verhaal, taal en recht in de Keltische wereld. Liber amicorum voor Leni van Strien-Gerritsen, Nijmegen: Stichting Uitgeverij de Keltische Draak, 2003. 111–128.
Jaski, Bart, “Voorwoord”, in: Rootseler, Mick van [tr.], Het avontuur van Lludd en Llefelys. Lustrumuitgave, Nijmegen: Stichting Uitgeverij de Keltische Draak, 2001. 4.
Jaski, Bart, “Kings and overkings. Propaganda for pre-eminence in early medieval Ireland”, in: Gosman, Martin, Arie Johan Vanderjagt, and Jan R. Veenstra (eds.), The propagation of power in the medieval West. Selected Proceedings of the International Conference, Groningen, 20-23 November 1996, Mediaevalia Groningana, Groningen: Egbert Forsten, 1997. 163–176.
Jaski, Bart, “Vrouwen in vroeg-middeleeuws Ierland: tussen Keltische gebruiken en christelijke bepalingen”, in: Hofman, Rijcklof, Bernadette Smelik, and Karel Jongeling (eds.), Kelten van Spanje tot Ierland, Utrecht: Stichting Uitgeverij de Keltische Draak, 1996. 43–72.
Jaski, Bart, “Marriage laws in Ireland and the Continent in the early Middle Ages”, in: Meek, Christine, and Katharine Simms (eds.), ‘The fragility of her sex’? Medieval Irishwomen in their European context, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 1996. 16–42.