Bibliography

Vivien
Law

13 publications between 1981 and 1998 indexed
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1998

article
Banham, Debby, Martha Bayless, Alicia Corrêa, Julia Crick, Mary Garrison, Joan Hart-Hasler, Peter Jackson, Michael Lapidge, Vivien Law, Rosalind Love, Richard Marsden, Andy Orchard, Charles D. Wright, and Neil Wright, “Text and translation; Commentary”, in: Bayless, Martha, and Michael Lapidge (eds), Collectanea Pseudo-Bedae, Scriptores Latini Hiberniae 14, Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 1998. 121–197; 199–286. 
From the preface (p. vii): “The present edition of the Collectanea pseudo-Bedae is essentially the production of a research seminar in the Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse, and Celtic (University of Cambridge) which met, under the direction of Michael Lapidge [...] As a result, the present text and translation are the corporate responsibility of the members of the seminar; in the individual Commentary, by contrast, individual contributions are signed.”
From the preface (p. vii): “The present edition of the Collectanea pseudo-Bedae is essentially the production of a research seminar in the Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse, and Celtic (University of Cambridge) which met, under the direction of Michael Lapidge [...] As a result, the present text and translation are the corporate responsibility of the members of the seminar; in the individual Commentary, by contrast, individual contributions are signed.”

1995

work
Law, Vivien, Wisdom, authority and grammar in the seventh century: decoding Virgilius Maro Grammaticus, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995. 

Contents: Introduction; 1. The outer layers: parody and word-play; 2. The wisdom tradition; 3. Avarice and the four keys to wisdom; 4. The multifarious nature of wisdom; 5. Heretical knowledge? The constitution of man; 6. The Epistolae: Virgilius' Retractatio?; 7. Concealment of mysteries: the techniques of secrecy; 8. Virgilius and the seventh century; 9. Conclusion; Appendices; Notes; Works cited; Index.

Contents: Introduction; 1. The outer layers: parody and word-play; 2. The wisdom tradition; 3. Avarice and the four keys to wisdom; 4. The multifarious nature of wisdom; 5. Heretical knowledge? The constitution of man; 6. The Epistolae: Virgilius' Retractatio?; 7. Concealment of mysteries: the techniques of secrecy; 8. Virgilius and the seventh century; 9. Conclusion; Appendices; Notes; Works cited; Index.

1993

article
Law, Vivien A., “Grammar in the early middle ages: a bibliography”, in: Law, Vivien A. [ed.], History of linguistic thought in the early Middle Ages, Studies in the History of the Language Sciences 71, Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 1993. 25–47.
edited work
Law, Vivien A. [ed.], History of linguistic thought in the early Middle Ages, Studies in the History of the Language Sciences 71, Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 1993. 
abstract:
Surveys of linguistics in the Middle Ages often begin with the twelfth century, dismissing the preceding six centuries as ‘devoid of originality’ or ‘dependent upon Donatus and Priscian’. This collection of articles devoted to linguistics in the early Middle Ages attempts to redress the balance by presenting a variety of approaches to new and controversial questions. The volume opens with a study of the historiography of early medieval grammar, with a bibliography of primary and secondary literature. The history of linguistic doctrine is discussed in articles dealing with Virgilius Maro Grammaticus, with the Irish contribution to the analysis of Latin, and with the Carolingian grammarians. A paper discussing a grammar from late Anglo-Saxon England (Beatus quid est) offers new insights into pedagogical techniques and the integration of literary texts into grammar teaching. The attitudes towards varieties of Latin in late antique and early medieval grammars are discussed in a wider context of cultural history. Finally, the volume includes two articles on the transmission of the grammars of the later Roman Empire to the early Middle Ages (Priscian and Dynamius).
abstract:
Surveys of linguistics in the Middle Ages often begin with the twelfth century, dismissing the preceding six centuries as ‘devoid of originality’ or ‘dependent upon Donatus and Priscian’. This collection of articles devoted to linguistics in the early Middle Ages attempts to redress the balance by presenting a variety of approaches to new and controversial questions. The volume opens with a study of the historiography of early medieval grammar, with a bibliography of primary and secondary literature. The history of linguistic doctrine is discussed in articles dealing with Virgilius Maro Grammaticus, with the Irish contribution to the analysis of Latin, and with the Carolingian grammarians. A paper discussing a grammar from late Anglo-Saxon England (Beatus quid est) offers new insights into pedagogical techniques and the integration of literary texts into grammar teaching. The attitudes towards varieties of Latin in late antique and early medieval grammars are discussed in a wider context of cultural history. Finally, the volume includes two articles on the transmission of the grammars of the later Roman Empire to the early Middle Ages (Priscian and Dynamius).
article
Law, Vivien A., “The historiography of grammar in the early middle ages”, in: Law, Vivien A. [ed.], History of linguistic thought in the early Middle Ages, Studies in the History of the Language Sciences 71, Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 1993. 1–23.

1991

article
Law, Vivien, “Fragments from the lost portions of the Epitomae of Virgilius Maro Grammaticus”, Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies 21 (Summer, 1991): 113–125.

1989

article
Law, Vivien A., “Learning to read with the oculi mentis: Virgilius Maro Grammaticus”, Literature and Theology: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Theory, Criticism and Culture 3 (1989): 159–172.

1986

article
Law, Vivien, “When is Donatus not Donatus? Versions, variants and new texts”, Peritia 5 (1986): 235–261.

1985

article
Law, Vivien, “Linguistics in the earlier Middle Ages: the Insular and Carolingian grammarians”, Transactions of the Philological Society 83 (1985, 1985): 171–193.

1983

article
Law, Vivien, “The study of Latin grammar in eighth-century Southumbria”, Anglo-Saxon England 12 (1983): 43–71.

1982

article
Law, Vivien, “Notes on the dating and attribution of anonymous Latin grammarians of the early middle ages”, Peritia 1 (1982): 250–267.
work
Law, Vivien, The Insular Latin grammarians, Studies in Celtic History 3, Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 1982.

1981

article
Law, Vivien, “Malsachanus reconsidered: a fresh look at a Hiberno-Latin grammarian”, Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies 1 (Summer, 1981): 83–93.