Bibliography

Proinsias
Mac Cana
b. 1926–d. 2004

77 publications between 1956 and 2013 indexed
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Works authored

Mac Cana, Proinsias, The cult of the sacred centre. Essays on Celtic ideology, Dublin: School of Celtic Studies, DIAS, 2011.
Mac Cana, Proinsias, Collège des Irlandais Paris and Irish studies, Dublin: DIAS, 2001.
Mac Cana, Proinsias, The Mabinogi, Writers of Wales, 2nd ed. (1977), Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1992.


Contributions to journals

Mac Cana, Proinsias, “Praise poetry in Ireland before the Normans”, Ériu 54 (2004): 11–40.
Mac Cana, Proinsias, “The ingen moel”, Ériu 52 (2002): 217–227.  
abstract:
The close collocation of ingen 'girl' and the adjective moel/mael occurs in a relatively small number of extant texts, but the instances are such as to suggest that it once enjoyed a certain currency as a term or set phrase in literary, and perhaps popular, discourse. It is found in the legal tract Bretha Étgid, the collection of triads known as Trecheng breth Féne, the Manx bible, and several other miscellaneous literary texts. However, they use it as a known item needing no further elaboration, and while some of its connotations are evident, it is still difficult to give it a precise, inclusive definition.
abstract:
The close collocation of ingen 'girl' and the adjective moel/mael occurs in a relatively small number of extant texts, but the instances are such as to suggest that it once enjoyed a certain currency as a term or set phrase in literary, and perhaps popular, discourse. It is found in the legal tract Bretha Étgid, the collection of triads known as Trecheng breth Féne, the Manx bible, and several other miscellaneous literary texts. However, they use it as a known item needing no further elaboration, and while some of its connotations are evident, it is still difficult to give it a precise, inclusive definition.
Mac Cana, Proinsias, “Syntax and style in Middle Welsh prose: notes on periphrasis and epitaxis”, Celtica 23 (1999): 157–168.
Mac Cana, Proinsias, “J. E. Caerwyn Williams: 1912–1999”, Studia Celtica 33 (1999): 354–357.
Mac Cana, Proinsias, “Ir. ba marb, W. bu farw ‘he died’”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 49–50 (1997): 469–481.
Mac Cana, Proinsias, and Dónall P. Ó Baoill, “On the extended use of ag before verbal nouns”, Ériu 47 (1996): 185–191.
Mac Cana, Proinsias, “Notes on the English edition of Culhwch and Olwen”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 29 (Summer, 1995): 53–57.
Mac Cana, Proinsias, “On the early development of written narrative prose in Irish and Welsh”, Études Celtiques 29 (1992): 51–67.  
abstract:
[FR] Sur les premiers développements de la prose narrative écrite en irlandais et en gallois.
Passant en revue les plus anciennes attestations de l’écriture dans les littératures celtiques médiévales, l’auteur se réfère à des études récentes suggérant qu’il y avait déjà un certain degré de culture écrite latine en Irlande, dès avant la christianisation, et que cela a pu faciliter, en son temps, le passage du vernaculaire à l’écriture. Il examine aussi les études qui ont cherché à établir, sur la base des textes conservés de la plus ancienne littérature, l’époque où les langues vernaculaires ont commencé à être écrites à des fins littéraires. En Irlande comme en Galles, la poésie traditionnelle paraît avoir été enregistrée bien plus tôt que la prose narrative, le décalage chronologique étant d’ailleurs plus grand au Pays de Galles. En fait la recherche récente tend à considérer que la tradition écrite du Hengerdd (la poésie galloise la plus ancienne) a commencé bien plus tôt qu’on ne l’a supposé jusque ici. Il aborde la question des rapports entre proses didactique et narrative, entre proses orale et écrite, en insistant sur l’importance d’une analyse stylistique et syntactique plus serrée pour la détermination du rôle de «la fonction» (function) et du «moyen-d’expression» (medium) dans la formation de la narration en prose du Moyen Age irlandais et gallois.

[EN] In his survey of the earliest evidence for the written text in the medieval Celtic literatures the author adverts to recent studies suggesting that there was a degree of Latin literacy in Ireland even in pre-Christian times and that this may have facilitated the eventual introduction of writing in the vernacular. He also reviews those studies which have sought, on the basis of the extant texts of the earliest surviving literature, to establish when the vernaculars began to be written for literary purposes. In both Ireland and Wales traditional verse appears to have been recorded considerably earlier than narrative prose, the chronology disparity being much greater in Wales. Indeed recent research tends to see the written tradition of the earliest Welsh verse, the Hengerdd, as beginning much earlier than was hitherto supposed. He touches upon the relationship of didactic and narrative prose on the one hand and of oral and written prose on the other, emphasizing the importance of closer stylistic and syntactic analysis for determining the role of function and medium in shaping medieval Irish and Welsh prose narrative.
Journal volume:  Persée – Études Celtiques, vol. 29, 1992: <link>
abstract:
[FR] Sur les premiers développements de la prose narrative écrite en irlandais et en gallois.
Passant en revue les plus anciennes attestations de l’écriture dans les littératures celtiques médiévales, l’auteur se réfère à des études récentes suggérant qu’il y avait déjà un certain degré de culture écrite latine en Irlande, dès avant la christianisation, et que cela a pu faciliter, en son temps, le passage du vernaculaire à l’écriture. Il examine aussi les études qui ont cherché à établir, sur la base des textes conservés de la plus ancienne littérature, l’époque où les langues vernaculaires ont commencé à être écrites à des fins littéraires. En Irlande comme en Galles, la poésie traditionnelle paraît avoir été enregistrée bien plus tôt que la prose narrative, le décalage chronologique étant d’ailleurs plus grand au Pays de Galles. En fait la recherche récente tend à considérer que la tradition écrite du Hengerdd (la poésie galloise la plus ancienne) a commencé bien plus tôt qu’on ne l’a supposé jusque ici. Il aborde la question des rapports entre proses didactique et narrative, entre proses orale et écrite, en insistant sur l’importance d’une analyse stylistique et syntactique plus serrée pour la détermination du rôle de «la fonction» (function) et du «moyen-d’expression» (medium) dans la formation de la narration en prose du Moyen Age irlandais et gallois.

[EN] In his survey of the earliest evidence for the written text in the medieval Celtic literatures the author adverts to recent studies suggesting that there was a degree of Latin literacy in Ireland even in pre-Christian times and that this may have facilitated the eventual introduction of writing in the vernacular. He also reviews those studies which have sought, on the basis of the extant texts of the earliest surviving literature, to establish when the vernaculars began to be written for literary purposes. In both Ireland and Wales traditional verse appears to have been recorded considerably earlier than narrative prose, the chronology disparity being much greater in Wales. Indeed recent research tends to see the written tradition of the earliest Welsh verse, the Hengerdd, as beginning much earlier than was hitherto supposed. He touches upon the relationship of didactic and narrative prose on the one hand and of oral and written prose on the other, emphasizing the importance of closer stylistic and syntactic analysis for determining the role of function and medium in shaping medieval Irish and Welsh prose narrative.
Mac Cana, Proinsias, “The petite patrie in modern Irish and Welsh literature”, Irish University Review 22:1 (1992): 13–32.
Mac Cana, Proinsias, “Irish maccóem, Welsh makwyf”, Ériu 42 (1991): 27–36.
Mac Cana, Proinsias, “On the accusative of destination”, Ériu 41 (1990): 27–36.
Mac Cana, Proinsias, “Three syntactic notes”, Celtica 15 (1983): 55–59.
Mac Cana, Proinsias, “Regnum and sacerdotium: notes on Irish tradition [Sir John Rhŷs Memorial Lecture]”, Proceedings of the British Academy 65 (1979): 443–479.
Mac Cana, Proinsias, “Varia V. An instance of modified narrative repetition in Fled Bricrenn”, Ériu 28 (1977): 168–172.
Mac Cana, Proinsias, “The sinless otherworld of Immram Brain”, Ériu 27 (1976): 95–115.
Mac Cana, Proinsias, “Two notes: On the word láech ‘warrior’; On a title in the MIr. tale-lists”, Celtica 11 (1976): 125–128, 128–132.
Mac Cana, Proinsias, “On the ‘prehistory’ of Immram Brain”, Ériu 26 (1975): 33–52.
Mac Cana, Proinsias, “The rise of the later schools of filidheacht”, Ériu 25 (1974): 126–146.
Mac Cana, Proinsias, “On Celtic word order and the Welsh ‘abnormal’ sentence”, Ériu 24 (1973): 90–120.
Mac Cana, Proinsias, “Conservation and innovation in early Celtic literature”, Études Celtiques 13:1 (1972-1973): 61–119.
Journal volume:  Persée – Études Celtiques, vol. 13, fascicule 1, 1972: <link> Persée – Études Celtiques, vol. 13, fascicule 2, 1973: <link>
Mac Cana, Proinsias, “Mongán Mac Fiachna and Immram Brain”, Ériu 23 (1972): 102–142.
Mac Cana, Proinsias, “Varia. I”, Ériu 20 (1966): 212–221.
Mac Cana, Proinsias, “On the use of the term retoiric”, Celtica 7 (1966): 65–90.
Mac Cana, Proinsias, “A poem attributed to Cormac mac Cuilennáin († 908)”, Celtica 5 (1960): 207–217.
Mac Cana, Proinsias, “Aspects of the theme of king and goddess in Irish literature (suite et fin)”, Études Celtiques 8:1 (1958, 1958–1959): 59–65.
Journal volume:  Persée – Études Celtiques, vol. 8, fascicule 1, 1958: <link> Persée – Études Celtiques, vol. 8, fascicule 2, 1959: <link>
Mac Cana, Proinsias, “Aspects of the theme of king and goddess in Irish literature (suite)”, Études Celtiques 7:2 (1956, 1955–1956): 356–413.
Journal volume:  Persée – Études Celtiques, vol. 7, fascicule 1, 1955: <link> Persée – Études Celtiques, vol 7, fascicule 2, 1956: <link>
Mac Cana, Proinsias, “Aspects of the theme of king and goddess in Irish literature”, Études Celtiques 7:1 (1955, 1955–1956): 76–114.
Journal volume:  Persée – Études Celtiques, vol. 7, fascicule 1, 1955: <link> Persée – Études Celtiques, vol 7, fascicule 2, 1956: <link>

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

Mac Cana, Proinsias, “Húas mo lebrán ind línech: Welsh and Irish cognates”, in: Ó Baoill, Dónall, Donncha Ó hAodha, and Nollaig Ó Muraíle (eds), Saltair saíochta, sanasaíochta agus seanchais: A festschrift for Gearóid Mac Eoin, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2013. 117–123.
Mac Cana, Proinsias, “Ireland and Wales in the Middle Ages: an overview”, in: Jankulak, Karen, and Jonathan M. Wooding (eds.), Ireland and Wales in the Middle Ages, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2007. 17–45.
Mac Cana, Proinsias, “Notes on the legend of Louernios”, in: Richter, Michael, and Jean-Michel Picard (eds.), Ogma: essays in Celtic studies in honour of Próinséas Ní Chatháin, Dublin: Four Courts, 2002. 138–144.
Mac Cana, Proinsias, “The motif of trivial causes”, in: Smyth, Alfred P. [ed.], Seanchas. Studies in early and medieval Irish archaeology, history and literature in honour of Francis J. Byrne, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2000. 205–211.
Mac Cana, Proinsias, “Complex adjectival predicates in Insular Celtic”, in: Jasanoff, Jay H., H. Craig Melchert, and Lisi Oliver (eds.), Mír curad: studies in honor of Calvert Watkins, Innsbruck: Institut für Sprachwissenschaft, University of Innsbruck, 1998. 439–450.
Mac Cana, Proinsias, “Prosimetrum in Insular Celtic literature”, in: Harris, Joseph, and Karl Reichl (eds), Prosimetrum: crosscultural perspectives on narrative in prose and verse, Cambridge: Brewer, 1997. 99–130.
Mac Cana, Proinsias, “Narrative openers and progress markers in Irish”, in: Klar, Kathryn A., Eve E. Sweetser, and Claire Thomas (eds.), A Celtic florilegium: studies in memory of Brendan O Hehir, Celtic Studies Publications 2, Lawrence, Massachusetts: Celtic Studies Publications, 1996. 104–120.
Mac Cana, Proinsias, “Mythology and the oral tradition: Ireland”, in: Green, Miranda J. [ed.], The Celtic world, London, New York: Routledge, 1995. 779–784.
Mac Cana, Proinsias, “Notes sur les analogues insulaires de la légende de Mélusine”, in: Conso, Danièle, Nicole Fick, and Bruno Poulle (eds), Mélanges François Kerlouégan, Annales littéraires de l'Université de Besançon 515, Paris: Les Belles Lettres, 1994. 419–437.
Mac Cana, Proinsias, “Further notes on constituent order in Welsh”, in: Fife, James, and Erich Poppe (eds.), Studies in Brythonic word order, Amsterdam Studies in the Theory and History of Linguistic Science 4.83, Amsterdam: Benjamins, 1991. 45–80.
Mac Cana, Proinsias, “Word-order in Old Irish and Middle Welsh: an analogy”, in: Matonis, A. T. E., and Daniel F. Melia (eds.), Celtic language, Celtic culture: a festschrift for Eric P. Hamp, Van Nuys, California: Ford & Bailie, 1990. 253–260.
Mac Cana, Proinsias, “On the uses of the conjunctive pronouns in Middle Welsh”, in: Ball, Martin J., James Fife, Erich Poppe, and Jenny Rowland (eds.), Celtic linguistics / Ieithyddiaeth Geltaidd: readings in the Brythonic languages. Festschrift for T. Arwyn Watkins, Amsterdam Studies in the Theory and History of Linguistic Science 4.68, Current Issues in Linguistic Theory, Amsterdam: Benjamins, 1990. 411–434.
Mac Cana, Proinsias, “Notes on the combination of prose and verse in early Irish narrative”, in: Tranter, Stephen N., and Hildegard L. C. Tristram (eds.), Early Irish literature — media and communication / Mündlichkeit und Schriftlichkeit in der frühen irischen Literatur, ScriptOralia 10, Tübingen: Narr, 1989. 125–147.
Mac Cana, Proinsias, “Fianaigecht in the pre-Norman period”, in: Almqvist, Bo, Séamas Ó Catháin, and Pádraig Ó Héalaí (eds.), Fiannaíocht: essays on the Fenian tradition of Ireland and Scotland — The heroic process: form, function and fantasy in folk epic, Béaloideas 54, 55, Dublin and Dun Laoghaire: An Cumann le Béaloideas Éireann, 1987. 75–99.
Proinsias Mac Cana, “Foreword”, in: Michael Lapidge • Richard Sharpe, A bibliography of Celtic-Latin literature, 400-1200 (1985).

As honouree

Carey, John, John T. Koch, and Pierre-Yves Lambert (eds.), Ildánach Ildírech. A festschrift for Proinsias Mac Cana, Celtic Studies Publications 4, Andover and Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 1999.

As honouree

Carey, John, John T. Koch, and Pierre-Yves Lambert (eds.), Ildánach Ildírech. A festschrift for Proinsias Mac Cana, Celtic Studies Publications 4, Andover and Aberystwyth: Celtic Studies Publications, 1999.

About the author

Lambert, Pierre-Yves, “Proinsias Mac Cana”, Études Celtiques 36 (2008): 197–198.