Bibliography

A. Joseph
McMullen

6 publications between 2010 and 2018 indexed
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Works edited

Henley, Georgia, and A. Joseph McMullen (eds), Gerald of Wales: new perspectives on a medieval writer and critic, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2018.  
abstract:
Gerald of Wales (c.1146–c.1223), widely recognised for his innovative ethnographic studies of Ireland and Wales, was the author of works that touch upon many aspects of twelfth-century life. Despite their valuable insights, the range of these works is vastly understudied, and the collection of essays in the present volume reassesses Gerald’s importance as a medieval Latin writer by focusing on the lesser-known works, and by providing a fuller context for his more popular writings.
abstract:
Gerald of Wales (c.1146–c.1223), widely recognised for his innovative ethnographic studies of Ireland and Wales, was the author of works that touch upon many aspects of twelfth-century life. Despite their valuable insights, the range of these works is vastly understudied, and the collection of essays in the present volume reassesses Gerald’s importance as a medieval Latin writer by focusing on the lesser-known works, and by providing a fuller context for his more popular writings.

Contributions to journals

McMullen, A. Joseph, and Kristen Carella, “Locating place and landscape in early Insular literature”, The Journal of Literary Onomastics 6:1 (2017): 2–10.
Digitalcommons.brockport.edu: <link>
McMullen, A. Joseph, “Enwau ac anryfeddodau Ynys Prydain and a tradition of topographical wonders in medieval Britain”, Studia Celtica Fennica 9 (2012): 37–53.  
abstract:
This paper attempts to determine the possible use of the Wonders tradition in later medieval Britain. Enwau ac Anryfeddodau Ynys Prydain and various English chronicles appropriate a marvelous landscape from a partially shared, circulating tradition of British Wonders.  I will argue that for both the Welsh and English writers, the Wonders of the Island of Britain are a significant aspect of their nationalist agenda and an important component of the ‘Matter of Britain’. Additionally, I will note that the manuscript context of Enwau ac Anryfeddodau Ynys Prydain convincingly suggests that it was thought of less as a translation (from potential Latin sources) or a geographical treatise and more as cyfarwyddyd (the traditional narrative material or lore of medieval Wales).  By upholding the Wonders as Welsh tradition, the Welsh establish themselves as the rightful custodians of the mythos of Prydain (Britain) and its mythological geography that was once theirs.
Journal volume:  Studia Celtica Fennica: <link>
abstract:
This paper attempts to determine the possible use of the Wonders tradition in later medieval Britain. Enwau ac Anryfeddodau Ynys Prydain and various English chronicles appropriate a marvelous landscape from a partially shared, circulating tradition of British Wonders.  I will argue that for both the Welsh and English writers, the Wonders of the Island of Britain are a significant aspect of their nationalist agenda and an important component of the ‘Matter of Britain’. Additionally, I will note that the manuscript context of Enwau ac Anryfeddodau Ynys Prydain convincingly suggests that it was thought of less as a translation (from potential Latin sources) or a geographical treatise and more as cyfarwyddyd (the traditional narrative material or lore of medieval Wales).  By upholding the Wonders as Welsh tradition, the Welsh establish themselves as the rightful custodians of the mythos of Prydain (Britain) and its mythological geography that was once theirs.